Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » October
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for October, 2012

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

A few circa 1830′s Comic Devils

For today’s holiday, a few images appropriate to Halloween, from American comic almanacs of the (mostly) 1830′s.

Above, the front cover of the 1839 Old American Comic Almanac, published by S.N. Dickinson. Beneath, the front cover from the 1835 edition of the predecessor series — The American Comic Almanac, published by Charles Ellms. Both were printed in Boston.

Click on the above & below pictures, to enlarge them, and see in greater detail.

Above, one of the panels from the circa 1830′s broadsheet, Humorous Scraps, also printed in Boston (publisher & precise date, unknown). Beneath, the front cover of Charles Ellms’ 1834 American Comic Almanac.

Above, the front cover of New York publisher Robert H. Elton‘s Jackson Almanac (as in Andrew Jackson) of 1836. This cover features both a “Monster Bank”, and someone representing the Whig Party tossed down a “Democractic Mill”/Grinder. (Sorry I don’t have an enlarged picture of this one — I don’t own a copy of it, so this picture came from some auction years ago.)

Beneath, a pirate head on a spike, from an inside page of the 1839 Nashville version of the Crockett Almanacs. The graphic itself, however, was swiped from the earlier 1837 Pirate’s Own Book, published by Charles Ellms (Boston).

Above, faeries with a demonic demeanor, grace the 1852 Elton’s Comic Almanac.

Below, a wizardly Father Time, on the front cover of Elton’s Comic All-My-Nack for 1849.

Finally, beneath, from the early days of railroads, when trains had a (deserved) reputation as death traps, is the rear cover of Dickinson’s 1839 Old American Comic Almanac.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug


Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Hallowin’ Weens # 753

 

 

 

 

Let’s start this Halloween edition appropriately with some more black and white EC for thee, see.

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2012/10/number-1254-horrors-its-halloween.html

Here’s a look at some art by Walt Simonson and others from Marvel’s little-known pulp digest from the seventies, The Haunt of Horror.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2012/10/black-and-white-wednesday-art-of-haunt.html

Of course we have to check in with Mr. Karswell today of all days as The Horrors of It All presents tons of horror stories for you!

http://thehorrorsofitall.blogspot.com/

Finally today, some choice early Nick Cardy with an unusual vampire tale.

http://timebulleteer.wordpress.com/2012/10/30/true-blood/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: “Arf” Goes Sandy

 

Here in the wake of the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, we’re tempted to think back to those halcyon days of the 1930’s and 40’s, when everything was rosy and Little Orphan Annie didn’t have a care in the world.

 

Of course, there was The Great Depression and the Second World War. Come to think of it, those weren’t really good times at all! Here’s hoping things get back to normal where you are very soon. In the words of Annie, “Never say die!” And it the words of her dog Sandy, “Arf!”

 

Click the link below and let your mind drift back to a happier, simpler time.

 

Little Orphan Annie – Jimmy Bowen Orch & Chorus

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Tigwissel Tuesdays #40: Drinking Water, 1877

Today’s post, is for the combo of Halloween Eve, and certain extremists, salivating at the hope of achieving their cherished goal of eliminating the Environmental Protection Agency, the Food & Drug Administration, and any of those other oppressive government bureaus, whose regulations restrain the freedom of corporations doing as they please. May they cheer that first glass of undiluted liberty! Drink Hearty!

From the September 12th, 1877 issue of Fun magazine, we have Our Water Supply — By a Sufferer from Water Companies, by artist James Sullivan.

Doug Wheeler

BritFun

Doug
Doug

Monday, October 29, 2012

Women’s Suffrage: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1912

We’re approaching both Halloween and next week’s election. What could be scarier subject for male Republican candidates than Women’s Suffrage(given how often they’re prone to make the colossal mistake of letting slip what their true opinions are)? All pages extracted from the October & November 1912 issues of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, sureall the candidates for President are for Women’s Rights. (Even those who truly aren’t.) By Herbert H. Perry, Camillus Kessler, William K. Patrick, and Gillam.

As in previous postings on this topic, it’s instructive to see what other cartoons related to women, were sitting in the same issues that Suffrage & anti-Suffrage cartoons were appearing. Below, a few cartoons on “Friend Wife”, by Perry, Fontaine Fox, and James H. Donahey.

In 1912, Ohio held rewrote its Constitution, to bring in new reforms. One of the reforms that some wanted to introduce, was to allow Ohio’s women to vote.

Above, a page of cartoons, involving those proud of the results. Note that there is zero mention of Women’s Suffrage. Art by Ole May, W.A. Ireland, Stinson, and Evans.

Beneath, there was zero mention of granting women the right to vote in Ohio’s 1912 Constitution, because, they didn’t. Cartoons on that loss, by Rogers (not “W.A”), Nash, Billy Ireland, and Donahey.

Above, a page of anti-Suffrage cartoons, by Plaschke, James North, and Arthur G. Racey.

Below, male harassment of women, depicted by Perry, Jack Wilson, and Frank Michael Spangler.

And to close, a suite of cartoons more typical of the depiction of men & women circa 1912 — all from the male viewpoint. Art by Spangler, Gaar Williams, Kessler, Fox, Perry, Karl K. Knecht, and Coffman.

For previous postings involving Women’s History, click here.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Woodrow Wilson William Howard Taft Teddy Roosevelt T.R.

Doug
Doug

Monday, October 29, 2012

Scratchin’ Backs # 752

 

Love him or hate him, there’s no denying the presence of  Smilin’ Stan Lee at nearly every point in comics history, as seen in this extensive photo gallery.

http://conversazionisulfumetto.wordpress.com/2012/10/24/vintage-stan-lee/

Here’s a fascinating blog from UK writer/editor Pat Mills, creator of 2000AD.

https://patmills.wordpress.com/

Here’s a look at perhaps the most notorious fifties horror tale of them all, Jack Davis’s Foul Play, complete with EC extras!

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2012/10/blog-post_28.html

Finally for fellow Facebookers, there’s a lively new Golden Age Comics Group you can join here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/294141427352481/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Sunday, October 28, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE: Marvin Mouse #1

Here’s a late 50′s Atlas funny animal one-shot signed by Stan Lee and his artist on Marvin Mouse one you’d never expect to see doing funny animals.  Bill Everett, the man who created the Sub-Mariner, helps Stan create perhaps the single most unattractive and unfunny funny animal in the history of comics.

As previously established maybe it’s just because they just so gosh darn easy to write but Stan desperately relied on the stock dumb character as his protagonist. someone literally too stupid to live.  I know that the dumb guy is a funny animal genre staple, which is understandable, seeing as how so many of them relied heavily on the rube/conman situation.  Here, thanks entirely to chance, Marvin always gets the best of would-be sharpie Honest John. But as you’ll see the bulk of the “stories” are really just bad dumb jokes told in comic strip fashion.  The only thing unique about Marvin is, in a complete reversal of the funny animal tradition he wore pants, but always went sans shirt.  This first and the only issue of Marvin Mouse also contains a Dippy Duck two pager by Lee and Joe Maneely which while bad is actually an improvement over the rest of its contents.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Changing Weather: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1912

Being that time of the year for a change in the weather, we look today at cartoons on that subject, from the October & November 1912 issues of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, we have art by Herbert H. Perry, J.E. Whiting, R.D. Handy, Coleman F. Naughton, Ernest E. Burtt, Luther D. Bradley, and Harry J. Westerman.

Below, from Walter R. Allman, Frank Michael Spangler, W.A. Ireland, and Elmer Donnell.

Still more, above, from James H. Donahey, Fontaine Fox, Kin Hubbard, Whiting, Matthew Caine, and “Tad” Dorgan.

And beneath, by artists Charles Lewis Bartholomew (“Bart”) and Guy Spencer. Plus two with now politically incorrect depictions involving “Indian Summer”, by Steel, Ole May, and Billy Ireland.

Doug Wheeler

NativeAmericanHistory

Doug
Doug

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1912

As we approach the Grand Finale of our political circus, SuperI.T.C.H. strives to keep you up on every twist & turn — from one century ago. Today our focus swings back to former U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt, seeking to return for a third term. He was running against not only the Democrats, but also against his G.O.P. successor, incumbent President W.H. Taft, whom T.R. felt had failed and betrayed the progress he (T.R.) had made while he was President. In the course of this fight, T.R. split the Republican Party in half, forming the new Progressive Party (which is more popularly remembered today as the Bull Moose Party).

Today’s posting comes from both the October & November 1912 issues of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, by A. Johnson of the German comic Kladderadatsch sees the Bull Moose Party.

Beneath, a page on the new Bull Moose Party, by Matthew Caine, Barnett, Robert Carter, and Stinson, including one — “Swat the Fly” — that plays on the then annual health campaign (click here), to identify plutocrats (wealthy corporate owners who believe they should rule the country) as “flies to be swatted”, and that T.R. (the rolled newspaper held aloft as a weapon) is the perfect candidate to do the latter.

Above, positive & negative takes on Teddy Roosevelt’s Progressive Party. Art by Bronstrup, Barnett (again), Harry Murphy, and Herbert Johnson.

Beneath, two (comic) shots taken at T.R. The first, by James H. Donahey, shows Roosevelt’s followers crowding into the Ananias Club, which as we’ve shown before was understood at that time to be calling Teddy and those for him, liars. More powerful, by Frank Michael Spangler, is Roosevelt Makes a Short Trip South, referencing how T.R. had betrayed Southern Black Delegates to the G.O.P. Convention, who had walked out to join the Bull Moose Party, only to have Teddy Roosevelt reject them, for fear that being seen having black supporters in the South, would cause the white Southern vote to go to his opponent (click here for a prior related posting on this topic).

Above, pro-T.R. cartoons, from cartoonists at newspapers which were supporting the Progressive Party. Which raises the question (which I can’t answer), that while one might assume that long-standing cartoonists at newspapers tended to agree politically with the paper’s owners (otherwise, they would have either long since left or been fired), where did Republican-leaning cartoonists stand versus their papers/employers, when that Party had split? Anyway, pro-T.R. cartoons above, by Richard Keith Culver, Edgar F. Schilder, Carter, and Hunter.

And beneath, anti-T.R. cartoons, by W.A. Ireland, Camillus Kessler, Murphy, and Clifford K. Berryman. (Note that the top left cartoon shows T.R. coming backstage to the man credited with a large part of Roosevelt’s financing — George Walbridge Perkins.)

Above, yet more anti-T.R. cartoons. (If it seems like there is an imbalance here, especially given that for most of the year, any imbalance would have favored Roosevelt, remember that at this point, he’s got two major parties — and their supporters — gunning for him.) Art by Charles “Doc” Winner, Ernest E. Burtt, Oscar Cesare, and Charles Henry Sykes.

We close out with a page of cartoonists take aim (and it wouldn’t matter what their political bent was for this one), at an amusing aspect of splitting one’s Party in half. It’s (pretty much) the norm that spouses marrying the children of a President, tend to be of the same political party as that President. And not surprising if they themselves, are politically active. Republican President T.R., had a son-in-law — Nicholas Longworth — who was a sitting Republican Congressman from Ohio. And whom did not switch his party affiliation to Progressive, when his much more famous and charismatic Dad-in-Law split apart the party, to lead the greatest third party showing in American history. Do I detect a sitcom here?? Anyway, picturing the situation of the poor sap caught between an indominatable father-in-law, and the job security tied up in his party affiliation, are cartoonists R.D. Handy, Charles Lewis Bartholomew (“Bart”), and Matthew Caine. (Longworth, by the way, lost his bid for re-election in 1912, but he regained his seat two years later, when the Progressive Party had faded.)

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics BlackHistory Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Friday, October 26, 2012

Child Labor: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons #106

With some Tea Party Republican extremists calling for the elimination of regulations, going so far as to eliminate regulations against Child Labor — and, with the possibility of a Republican President who allow this and other extremist legislation from a Republican Congress to pass without a veto — we take a look at a few cartoons published during the days when Child Labor was legal in America.

Above, by Art Young, from the August 4th, 1909 issue of Puck magazine, we have The Galley. Sub-titled “Dedicated to the States Where Child Labor is Still Permitted” — U.S. child labor laws at this point were a state-by-state matter.

National Child Labor laws in the U.S. (as we currently understand them) were not established until 1938. Republicans in Congress repeatedly fought to prevent laws against child labor, arguing it would violate childrens’ right to employment. When F.D.R. did get laws passed, the conservative Supreme Court of that time, knocked those laws down. It was only late into the Depression (again, 1938), when Republicans finally relented to public pressure, that cheaply-paid children were taking jobs from adults.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, a close-up on the sign seen over the shoulders of the overseer: “Child-Labor investigators, sentimentalists, charity organizations, and all meddling old women, KEEP OUT.”

Above, Child Labor, by Robert Minor, Jr., originally published in the December 22nd, 1924 issue of The Daily Worker, and reprinted in the 1926 edition of Red Cartoons.

Beneath, from the October 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine, “No; got all the help I need”, by Hal Coffman.
.

Children were not the only ones endangered when they were employed as industrial laborers. Above, from the centerspread of the October 4th, 1882 issue of Puck magazine, we have Discrimination, The Selfish Millionaire — How He is Taken Care of, and How He Takes Care of His Patrons, by Frederick Graetz. It depicts the September 23rd, 1882 collision of two passenger trains (one moving at full speed, the other stopped). It’s direct cause was the failure of a flag operator to signal the moving train to switch tracks at the correct moment. The underlying problem, though, was that rather than employ adults, who wanted a wage high enough to support their families, W.H. Vanderbilt hired less expensive children. Children who, standing around all day waiting for the correct moment to switch track settings, became easily bored & distracted, and didn’t fully comprehend the consequences of inattentiveness in such a work environment. Note the inset cartoon, showing four hired boys watching, as Vanderbilt tallies on a sheet of paper, “Full Grown Man — $30.00. Half Grown Boy — $10.00. Profit $20″. Behind Vanderbilt is a sign reading “Boys Wanted to do Mens’ Work”. Below the inset panel, we see two signal boys playing jacks, rather than paying attention to what is happening around them. To see more cartoons on the above incident, click here.

We close with a cartoon, below, by Syd Hoff. It appeared in Hoff’s 1935 published collection, The Ruling Clawss.

To find prior episodes of this series,click on Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons. And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

Financial Reforms

Doug
Doug

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