Super I.T.C.H » Political Cartoons
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for the ‘Political Cartoons’ Category

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Women’s Suffrage: Cartoons Magazine Centennial August-Sept 1913

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For Women’s History Month, we have two Cartoons Magazine articles on the Woman’s Suffrage Movement, one each from August 1913 and September 1913.

Click on the above & below pages, to make the cartoons & article large enough to read.

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Doug Wheeler

Women’s History

Doug
Doug

Sunday, March 16, 2014

“Votes for the Women”: T.E.Powers’ 1912 “Joys & Glooms”

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Women’s History Month continues with the above sequence found in artist T.E. Powers‘ 1912 collection of his continuing comic strip, Joys & Glooms. As evidenced by “Votes for the Women”, Powers was anti-Women’s Suffrage, his comedy touching upon several of the most popular fears & stereotypes of what would happen to men, should women gain the vote.

Click on the above comic strip to view it in large enough detail to read it.

NOTE: read first the top tier of panels across both pages, then the bottom tier.

Doug Wheeler

Women’s History

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Women’s Suffrage: Cartoons Magazine Centennial June-July 1913

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For Women’s History Month, we have two Cartoons Magazine articles on the Woman’s Suffrage Movement, one each from June 1913 and July 1913.

Click on the above & below pages, to make the cartoons & article large enough to read.

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Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug


Thursday, February 27, 2014

The New House That Jack Built, 1865

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African American History Month continues, with the 1865 Civil War Anti-Slavery booklet The New House that Jack Built, with verse by L. Whitehead, and cartoon illustrations by Henry Louis Stephens.

I was planning to scan my copy, but then I found that the complete book is already online. So, I merely scanned my cover plus the illustration above. Clicking on cover, below, will open up Archive.org‘s fully scanned version.

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Doug Wheeler

Black History Month H.L. Stephens

Doug
Doug

Thursday, February 6, 2014

The House That Jeff Built, 1863

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For this year’s round of African American History Month postings, we open with cartoonist David Claypoole Johnston‘s Civil War-era broadsheet, “The House That Jeff Built”. Johnston is remembered mainly for his collections of non-sequential single panel images, “Scraps”, beginning in 1828. This is one of but a few times Johnston instead arranged his page to tell a unified multi-panel comic strip story. Johnston died in 1865, after the War’s conclusion.

Click on the above picture, to view the story in detail, and be able read its text.

Watch later this month, for a second Civil War-themed “House that Jack Built”-inspired parody.

Doug Wheeler

Jeff Davis Jefferson Davis

Doug
Doug

Friday, November 29, 2013

Woman’s Suffrage: Emeline Pankhurst’s Visit to the U.S., Oct-Nov 1913

The methods used by women suffragettes, working to gain their right to vote, varied amongst the different movements. In the U.S., the women’s movement used mostly peaceful protest, while in Britain, part of their movement was becoming increasingly militant. They threw bricks, smashed windows, engaged in arson, and even bombed public buildings. Emeline Pankhurst was a leader of this militant approach.

In October & November 1913, just recently released from prison, Pankhurst visited the U.S. for a speaking tour. While British authorities were more than happy to see her going, there was a debate in the U.S. prior to her arrival, on whether she should even be allowed entrance. Their fear was that Pankhurst would persuade U.S. suffragettes to take up the more violent approach of their British counterparts.

Today’s post presents Cartoons Magazine‘s coverage of what was labeled as “Pankhursteria”, surrounding her U.S. tour. First, we have the five pages on Pankhurst, from Cartoons Magazine‘s November 1913 issue. Cartoons accompanying this issue’s article, were taken from Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling (above), W.A. Ireland (below left), and Nelson Harding (below right).

Click on the above & below pages, to see the cartoons in fuller detail, and be able to read the text.

Above, the last two pages from the November 1913 issue, including art by Guy Spencer and E.A. Bushnell.

Beneath, the opening pair of pages of December 1913‘s Cartoons Magazine article, with a full page cartoon by Daniel Fitzpatrick, at right.

Additional cartoons: above, by Robert Satterfield and Winner; below, by Billy Ireland and Ole May.

Click on Women’s History to view prior postings of that subject.

Doug Wheeler

Women’s History Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Republican Party Split, Year 2: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1913

Those following SuperITCH last year, may recall our reprinting of cartoons from the 1912 Presidential Election, covering what is still the most significant splintering of the Republican Party. Republican Party bosses — at a time when most state primaries were mere window dressing (party hacks chose which candidates ran in the final election, not the voters) — decided to stick with their incumbent President, Republican William Howard Taft, while the majority of Republican voters wanted former President, Teddy Roosevelt. When Taft was selected at the Republican Convention that year, T.R. and his delegates walked out of the convention, forming their own political party — the Progressive Party (more commonly known as the Bull Moose Party).

The Republicans in rebellion were centrist reformers. Their exodus left the G.O.P. with mostly die-hard Conservatives. Supported by that faction alone, the Republican Party ended 1912 elections in a dismal third place. The new Bull Moose Party coming in second, did not fare well afterwards, either, as it was built largely around the popularity of one man.

Since the conclusion of the 2012/1912 elections, I’ve shown few political cartoons, because truthfully, even I was sick & exhausted of them! After the end of the 1912 election, however, the G.O.P. split did not suddenly vanished, with both sides happily reuniting. The animosity between the Progressive Party and staid Republicans still filled the air. Bull Moose candidates had won seats in Congress. Throughout 1913, cartoons depicting disdain for the G.O.P. by those who’d walked out, and the failed efforts to reunite the two, continued. I didn’t seen a legitimate context to today, for showing these. But, with these past several weeks of the Republicans’ extreme right-wing holding the nation’s laws & economy hostage (again!), to attempt to gain via blackmail what they failed to win by the ballot box, I now do find these past examples of fratricidal conflict within the G.O.P., worthy of running.

The scans shown here, are ones I’d already completed, before deciding I couldn’t use them. Should Republicans extend their attempted extortion beyond this Thursday, then I’ll starting scanning the cartoons on the G.O.P. Split from 1913, that I had skipped.

Above, the “Munsey Plan” — an attempt to bring together the two parties — depicted by John Scott Clubb and William Kemp Starrett. Beneath, by Charles Henry Sykes, sign posts pointing towards opposite camps (with footprints in the snow showing how some — post-election — switched back). All are from the February 1913 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and better read their captions.

Above, also from February 1913, T.R. rejecting the Munsey Plan, by Harold Heaton.

Three months later — from the May 1913 issue — publisher and major financial backer of Teddy Roosevelt & the Bull Moose Party, Frank A. Munsey, was still attempting to bring the parties together. Art by Tom May, Coleman F. Naughton, and W.A. Ireland.

Doug Wheeler

Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Monday, October 7, 2013

The Elephant that Forgot

Though, to be fair, despite the appearances of some, none of today’s elephants were alive in 1888 —

– Above, from the front cover of the October 3rd, 1888 edition of Puck magazine, artist Joseph Keppler, Sr. depicts the efforts of Republican Congressmen to dig a trap for Democratic President Grover Cleveland…

Need more be said?…

Click on the above & picture, to view the cartoon in greater detail, including the labels on the various congress members and their tools.

Doug Wheeler

KepplerSr NYPuck

Doug
Doug

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Immigration Fight of 1913: Cartoons Magazine Centennial

A week-and-a-half ago, after much debate, the U.S. Senate passed an Immigration Reform Bill which is pleasing to no one. This week, the House of Representatives — controlled by Republicans not, many of whom are opposed to the legislation, partially because it would bring in as voting citizens, mostly individuals who likely will not vote for them…

The timing thus seems right, to look a century back to 1913, when West Coast states (most notably California) and their elected officials, were engaged in openly race-based legislation to attempt to bar Japanese from immigrating to the U.S. …

Robert Minor, Jr., above, depicts the hypocrisy of Uncle Sam’s Immigration Wall — from the June 1913 edition of Cartoons Magazine.

Beneath, “None So Blind”, from the July 1913 issue, by Oscar Cesare.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

These two sets of pages are from the June 1913 article , “California and the Japanese”. Art above by John T. McCutcheon and W.A. Rogers; below by Guy Spencer, Cy Hungerford, and W.A. Ireland.

Concluding “California and the Japanese”, above, we have art above by Tige Reynolds, Ole May, and Elmer Donnell.

All of the beneath pages, are the July 1913 Cartoons Magazine article, “The Japanese Situation”, with art in the first below page by Hungerford (again), and J.E. Whiting.

The article “The Japanese Situation” continues, with art by Howe, Hunter, and Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling (above); and Billy Ireland and John Scott Clubb (below).

Finally, in the concluding pages of the July 1913 article, we have art below by Spencer, Biggers, and Paul A. Plaschke.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Cinco de Mayo: Mexican Revolution & Cartoons Magazine Centennials, 1913

For this year’s Cinco de Mayo, we have a number of cartoons that appeared in first half of 1913, in various newspapers, and from there were reprinted in Cartoons Magazine.

In the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920, February & March 1913 were particularly volatile. The occupants of the National Palace changed hands several times, inspiring the James H. Donahey cartoon that appeared below, on the front cover of the April 1913 edition of Cartoons Magazine.

Above, the May 1913 issue reprints cartoonist Ole May‘s prediction of the end of President Franciso Madero.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read the text.

The U.S. had supported dictator Porfirio Diaz, whome Madero had overthrown. The above cartoon by Harry J. Westerman, suggests a return to power by Diaz.

U.S. cartoons in general — such as the one by Charles “Doc” Winner below — reflected the racist attitude of white America, which viewed all of Latin America as inferior, requiring their Uncle Sam to tell them how to behave.

Above, and in the three double-page scans that follow, we have the article “Cartoons and Cartoonists of Mexico”, written by Harry H. Dunn, formerly the news editor of the publications La Prensa, and The Daily Mexican.

Dunn’s opening paragraph about Mexican cartooning having died with the destruction of the Aztec Empire by Spanish Conquistadors (implying that their codices were merely cartoons, rather than the written language that they were), and that Mexican cartoons do not begin again until 1910, is pure hogwash (in addition to being off by at least a century — click here to view a Mexican comic book from 1801.)

However, in his description of the then-“current” situation in Mexico, and of four of its then-prominent cartoonists — S.R. de la Vega, Telas Allendez, L.R. Noriega, and F. Ariza — the article is worth reading. So long as you also keep in mind that Dunn himself, was not Mexican, anymore than Mitt Romney’s ancestors, who lived in Mexico in flight from U.S. Law, were. Dunn’s article, thus, also carries a U.S. point-of-view.

Above & below — all from April 1913 — more U.S. cartoons concerning the Mexican Revolution, including several with patronizing attitude on full display.

Above, cartoons by Lynch, James E. Murphy, and Taylor.

Cartoons above, by Nelson Harding, Bronstrup, Shonkwiler, Barnett, and Donahey, Shonkwiler & Barnett (not incorrectly, and not for their first time) suggesting that the (at thi spoint) oft-threatened U.S. intervention in the Mexican Civil War, was motivated more by protecting the investments of U.S. millionaires, than by protecting anyone or anything else.

Below, by Ben Franklin Hammond, Charles Henry Sykes, W.A. Ireland, James H. Donahey, and Robert Minor, Jr..

Doug Wheeler

Billy Ireland Focus on Cartoonists

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Doug

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