Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » November
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Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for November, 2012

Friday, November 30, 2012

Cartoons Magazine Centennial’s Post-Election 1912

Finally, finally, we’ve reached the Closing Out, of the Closing Out, of the 1912 Election! (It’s only taken me, like, a hundred years.) As a reprinter of the prior months’ editorial cartoons, Cartoons Magazine‘s November Election follow-up, naturally appeared in its December (mostly) & January (some) issues. In this post, the page is from the December issue, unless I specify it appeared in the January 1913 issue.

Above, After the Votes Were Counted, by artist A.D. Condo (creator of The Outbursts of Everett True), depicting a despondent President William Howard Taft, and a collapsed G.O.P., at their third place finish. (I have no idea what or who “C.P.” stands for.)

Click on the above & below pages, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Cartoons Magazine‘s commentary on how cartoonists covered the election. The December 1912 issue was the first to feature such a long prose piece, and there are several more in this issue, about or by cartoonists (we’ll show those in a later posting). Starting with this issue, prose articles became a regular element in the magazine.

Above, cartoonist Billy Ireland on the “Stand Pat”, no compromise attitude that Republicans took into the 1912 Election (inset cartoon, from pre-Election). And, the result of their taking such positions.

(Does the above in anyway sound familiar??…)

Below, additional election aftermath for the G.O.P., by John Scott Clubb and Ole May.

Above (jokingly), Robert La Follete “To the Rescue”, pictured by Gaar Williams.

Beneath, John DeMar on Woodrow Wilson‘s election (left), and, James H. Donahey, on the Republican Party looking for the return to their fold, of Teddy Roosevelt.

Another type of election loser, above, by Fontaine Fox, Hruska, and Burt Thomas.

Beneath, from the January 1913 issue, Bull Moose/Progressive Party financier George Perkins, shown the door, now that the Party has lost. Cartoons by Robert Carter, Gaar Williams, and Charles “Doc” Winner.

Above, “If we Had an Ex-Presidents Club”, by Donahey, Clubb, and Fox, featuring Taft & T.R.

Below, by William Charles Morris, from the January 1913 issue, university professor Woodrow Wilson, puts on a President’s Hat, while outgoing President Taft, tries on a Professor’s hat.

Above, Teddy Roosevelt’s Son-in-Law, Nicholas Longworth, pictured post-election by artist Oscar Cesare. Longworth had been a sitting Republican Congressman from Ohio, when his more famous father-in-law split the G.O.P. in two. Longworth stuck with the Republicans, which didn’t go down well with T.R.; plus he lost his seat in Congress (but would regain it in the next election).

Beneath (from January 1913, by Charles “Doc” Winner), one term President William Howard Taft, preparing to make his final address to Congress.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics W.A. Ireland

Doug
Doug

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Deadly Dan, the Dare-Devil, 1878

Above, we close out our annual Native American Heritage Month postings, with “Deadly Dan, the Dare-Devil, A Dime Novel of Today” or “What Our Boys Are Reading”, by artist Livingston Hopkins, from the August 27th, 1878 front page of the (New York) Daily Graphic.

Click on the page, to view it in a larger size, and thus be able to read it.

Dime novels of the day promoted to readers the idea of the civilized white man conquering the savage red man, in their various “Adventures of Indian Slayers”. (They were far from the only source for this.) Below, a close-up of the panel of “Deadly Dan”, dealing with “Indian Slaying”.

Beneath, art by Opper, linking to a prior posting involving Dime Novels and Indian Killing (click on it).

Doug Wheeler

NativeAmericanHistory NYDailyGraphic

Doug
Doug

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Drinkin’ Cokes # 763

 

 

Think you’ve seen everything Alex Toth ever drew? Think again.

http://www.libraryofamericancomics.com/blog/article/2443/

This issue of Superman could have been blank inside and that cover still would have sold it.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2012/11/grooves-faves-starry-eyed-siren-of.html

Always time for some vintage Kurt Schaffenberger adventures of The Little Blue Cheese.

http://capmarjr.blogspot.com/2012/11/cmj-and-disappearance-of-statue-of.html

Finally, some interesting crossovers and returns in the current Dick Tracy series, now dealing with costumed heroes!

http://www.gocomics.com/dicktracy/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The “I Did It” Club, 1916

As we continue our post-election close-out, we look at the 1916 book, The “I Did It” Club. By artist Clifford K. Berryman — who was Republican — The “I Did It” Club was published by the Gridiron Club of Washington. D.C., for it’s post-Election dinner, and offers a basically Republican-slant on why Democratic President Woodrow Wilson won re-election in 1916, by caricaturing persons who “helped Wilson win”.

(NOTE: Berryman was at some point President of the Grid-Iron Club — though whether he was President of the club when this item was published, I do not know — none of the many sources mentioning this honor that I’ve found, bother to say in what year(s) Berryman held that position.)

Above, a horde of job-seekers, all claiming that they had helped re-elect the President.

Below: apparently certain offered excuses for losing are eternal… This Berryman cartoon suggests that Wilson was re-elected because of cash giveaways (or, “gifts”). In this case, to farmers. (As opposed to “gifts”, say, to Wall Street, or, wealthy donors, or, industrial polluters, or, the military industrial complex, or…). I guess whether something is labeled a “gift” or a “policy” — in politics — depends on which party your sympathies are with.

Above, Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, urging Mexican Revolutionary Leader Pancho Villa and Mexican President Venustiano Carranza, to make nice until after the Presidential Election… (as if they would do that). So, as we see from the past, it matters not whether international incident occurs, or doesn’t — either way, the losers will claim the incident (or lack thereof) to be an election conspiracy… (In March 1916, President Wilson sent 10,000 U.S. troops into Mexico, intervening in the Mexican Revolution, after Pancho Villa crossed the border and raided U.S. Army barracks. U.S. Troops were still in Mexico during the election, fighting occasional skirmishes with Villa — I guess Wilson’s opponents were hoping something bad enough would happen to turn the 1916 election in their favor…)

Beneath, Senators Thomas J. Walsh of Montana, and Willard J. Saulsbury of Delaware.

Above, George Brinton McClellan Harvey — a former friend of Wilson, turned political enemy, who claimed in the month before the 1916 Election, that Wilson would be overwhelmingly defeated; and then after the election, pointed a decade back to statements he’d made when was friends with Woodrow Wilson, to claim he knew all along…

Beneath, another sour grapes Republican claim of “gift giving”…

Above, William Jennings Bryan, claiming to have helped Wilson win because of the speeches he made for him. And, Bryan may well have helped, just as Bill Clinton very obviously helped President Obama win re-election. Gee, I wonder why Republicans didn’t bring out their last President to make speeches, and “help” Mitt Romney… ??? :)

Below, Utah — which had been one of the few states to vote for G.O.P candidate Taft in 1912 — went Democratic in 1916.

Above, John M. Parker, who was the Bull Moose Party‘s vice-Presidential candidate for 1916. Teddy Roosevelt (peeking out from behind the tree, and muttering “Traitor!”) had by 1916 left the Party he’d founded, and returned to the Republican Party. Without T.R., the Progressive Party faded to just another third party. Given the facts, I find the above Berryman cartoon, confusing.

Beneath, James Middleton Cox, Democratic Governor of Ohio.

Above, Rhode Island Senator (Democrat) Peter Goelet Gerry. Why he’s depicted in Native garb, I have no idea.

Below, T.R.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Havin’ Hulks # 762

 

Here’s an interesting look at some oft-reused and recycled Hulk artwork originally done in the seventies.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-monster-unleashed.html

And here’s an interesting write-up about licensed comics in the forties, fifties and sixties.

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2012/11/may-i-see-your-license-please.html

If you’re a Wally Wood fan (and what sensible comics fan isn’t?), The Official Wood Estate site will also link you to the very active Wood Facebook page!

http://www.wallacewoodestate.com/

Here’s a lovely 3 page girly strip by Nebot whom I recall from Warren’s 1984.

http://mundobocado.blogspot.com/2012/11/lady-love-i.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Huckleberry Sounds

 

One of the joys of writing this blog is sharing incredibly great, obscure records with all you comics fans. The other is forcing you to listen to really rotten records. I mean, truly bad, awful songs. Utter garbage.

This Tuesday, I’m pleased to be able to present both! And both are about Huckleberry Hound, the animated Andy Griffith, who had a surprising number of records. (So did Andy Griffith, but that’s a subject for another blog.)

 

 

 

Huckleberry Hound, or “Huck” as we call him here at I.T.C.H. HQ, was famous for singing “Clementine” at the drop of a hat – and he dropped his own hat! But here we have something far worse, and much better!

 

 

 

 

First listen to the Huckleberry Hound TV show theme song, which brings back many fond memories. Only to have those memories TRASHED by some imposter voice artists. I guess they couldn’t get Daws Butler and Don Messick for this travesty, so they just used whoever was standing closest to the microphone at the time. Possibly the mailman. Or the guy who delivers coffee. Either way, I hope he never worked again after this.

Then, to redeem ourselves and hopefully not lose any of our loyal listeners and readers, I’d like you to hear a rockin’ little tune called “Huckleberry Hound.” I don’t know where this came from but it’s not half bad! Or at least, it seems good in comparison with the other record. Ugh. Don’t remind me.

Listen to them both and see if you agree.

Click the link below and enjoy.

 

Huckleberry Hound Theme (with bad voices)

Huckleberry Hound Rocks!

 

 

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

“A May Melange”: Tigwissel Tuesdays # 42.5

Since we’re on the cusp of Winter, what better time to run “A May Melange”, by artist Livingston Hopkins? From the front page of the May 1st, 1876 issue of the (New York) Daily Graphic, why, on Earth, am I running this page that clearly has no scientific element?

Because, look towards the figure, bottom center. At one point, I was uncertain if that might not be a cameo appearance by Professor Tigwissel. I’ve pretty much concluded it is not. But still, for some idiot reason, I can’t let go of the slightest chance, and so here it is.

Click on the above page, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

NYDailyGraphic ProfTigwissel

Doug
Doug

Monday, November 26, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Book of All Comics Part 3

And, at long last, here’s the third and final part of Book of All Comics.  First up, an adventure of Johnny Earthquake, one of those without portfolio crime fighters you had  a lot of  back in the Golden Age who operated without the benefit of a detective’s badge or private detective’s license.  He’s also a good example of just how desperate for names you could get back then.

Next up a story featuring Red Robbins, a supposedly super fast crime fighter, although in this installment he doesn’t use his powers even once (the closest he comes to running is a “desperate leap”.   More of interest in his toxic racist stereotype “faithful negro friend” Speed Karr, who appears to be a moonlighting Ebony White from The Spirit.

And finally, two shorts featuring Pussy Katnip, a ‘Cafe owner who drinks a vitaminized “catnip” drink and gains superpowers’.   It’s not good but, gosh, is it weird.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Saturday, November 24, 2012

“Little Jimmy” Meets “Canyon Kiddies”, by James Swinnerton

Next in our Native American Heritage Month coverage, we’ve scanned part of the Little Jimmy section, from the 1934 Book 2 of Famous Comics. Each of Famous Comics’ three issues collected daily comic strips of three different series. In Book 2, the run of artist James Swinnerton’s strip, Little Jimmy, crossed over with another Swinnerton strip: Canyon Kiddies, set in the Arizona Southwest, and featuring idealized Native children.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the strips in greater detail, and read it.

Doug Wheeler

NativeAmericanHistory

Doug
Doug

Friday, November 23, 2012

Good Ol’ Days: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, November 1912

For our November entry of our monthly Cartoons Magazine Centennial Year Good Ol’ Days posting, we start with a page not appropriate to our times… But, then, these are supposed to be the “Good Ol’ Days”. Art above by Guy Spencer, Rogers, Ernest E. Burtt, and others.

Below, a page appropriate to all times, Good & Bad. Cartoons by Burtt (again), W.A. Ireland, O’Loughlin, and Coleman F. Naughton.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, by Barnett, the downfall of Race Track Gambling gets targeted for a second month in a row. We’ll see later if this becomes a trend.

Beneath, the always popular kid stuff, with James H. Donahey, Fontaine Fox, and Russell Cole.

And more kid stuff above, combined with football and baseball, by Fox, Ireland, and Rogers, all with additional entries today.

Below, Charles Lewis Bartholomew (“Bart”), Henderson, and William K. Patrick, celebrate those sports, involving grown-ups.

Above & below, different aspects of Fall. Above, by Herbert H. Perry, O’Loughlin, Cy Hungerford, and Hruska. Below, with Fox, Perry, and Naughton.

And finally, a closing cartoon from the age of urban mass transit, when cities had electric cable car systems, and (most??) urban dwellers used them to get around. Cartoon by O’Loughlin.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug


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