Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » September
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for September, 2012

Friday, September 28, 2012

Three-Way Partying 2!: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, September 1912

Welcome back again, to a look at the days when Mr. & Mrs. America decided to flirt with threeways! Above, voters and Uncle Sam alike, find themselves tangled and rope bound with major Party Animals, the Democratic Donkey, Republican Elephant, and Progressive Party Bull Moose. Art by Bronstrup, Doc Hirer Finch, Harry J. Westerman, and John Campbell Cory.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Presidential candidates Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and William Howard Taft, all attempting to cozy up to newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst. Lower left, Hearst pictured as the cartoon character he once published — the Yellow Kid. Lower right, two views of Woodrow Wilson. Art by Tige Reynolds, O’Loughlin, and Charles Lewis Bartholomew (“Bart”).

Above & below — from the September 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine (as this entire post is) — William Jennings Bryan dogging T.R. Bryan was playing a similar role to Bill Clinton now, as the elder Democratic statesman, attacking Wilson’s opponent. Cartoons above, are by W.A. Ireland, and John Campbell Cory; below, by Bronstrup, Charles Bowers and Wilson of the Kansas City Post.

Above, W.A. Ireland again, taking a simultaneous swipe at both T.R., and the Socialist Party. (That’s the actual Socialist Party — whose candidates were much better known than now, and received a far larger vote, thanks to how the ruling Plutocracy and its abuses, resulted in wider radicalization of workers.

Below, a page on Senator Robert La Follette, who was indignant at Teddy Roosevelt having claimed the Republican Progressive banner that La Follette felt was his. Both Westerman and Bowers appear again below, as well as William Kemp Starrett.

Above & below, still more on the Socialist Party, by Cy Hungerford and Nate Collier (above), and Ryan Walker (below).

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics T.R. Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Friday, September 28, 2012

Breakin’ Banks # 743

 

 

 

 

Let’s start with a comparison of reprints vs. original using the classic Fantastic Four # 5 as an example.

http://kleefeldoncomics.blogspot.com/2012/09/fantastic-four-5-comparisons.html

Not exactly comics but here’s a comprehensive reference site to various pulp magazine artists.

http://www.pulpartists.com/index.html

Some of George Tuska’s best art was on his Buck Rogers run as seen here in a sequence from 1960.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-buck-continues-here-thursday-story.html

Finally today, The Phantom Stranger blog has been reactivated with new posts.

http://iamthephantomstranger.blogspot.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Back-to-School: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1912

To close out this year’s Back-to-School run, above & below are a few pages that managed to escape my sweep of Cartoons Magazine, by hiding out in the November 1912 issue, way past when I would have thought that Back-to-School cartoons would have been running…

Cartoonists above are: H.T. Webster, William Kemp Starrett, and Fontaine Fox.

Below, Frank Michael Spangler and W.A. Ireland.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

CollegeComics Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Patsy’s Reflections

Without question one of the strangest comics in my digital collection is Patsy’s Reflections, published in 1950, a collection of comic strips that originally ran in the British newspaper The Daily Mirror.  It’s basically a comic cook book that places it’s recipes in the context of the adventures of young, inexperienced housewife Patsy,  She”s trying to keep hard working husband Peter well fed in post-war Britain and always willing to lend a hand is neighbor Joan Featherpenny and all knowing Mrs. Always.  They help her find inventive ways to cook tasty, nutritious food in a Britain still suffering under austerity of food rationing.

I like this one a lot for a lot of reasons.  For one thing, it’s a deftly crafted comic strip that manages to convey information while it entertains — which isn’t easy. Then there’s the fact it’s an intriguing historical document that tells us a lot about what life must have been like in post-war  England.  But mostly I like it because it’s about cooking and food, subjects that English language comics tend to avoid.

And being a great big fat guy, I am of course extremely interested in food.  Hell, I was into it decades before all  this “foodie culture” crap when it was considered to be juvenile, perhaps even feminine for a heterosexual man enjoy to his food a too much. Sure your basic He-Man reg’lar feller was allowed to appreciate the occasionally well cooked steak and baked potato under “the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach” exemption.  Hell, he might even be allowed to enjoy something as fundamentally girly as desert in public, just so long as it was something unfussily wholesome like a slab of apple pie.  Food was like sex, it was just not something that was overtly talked about — and to do so was more than slightly suspect.  And of course there was always men, you know, actual, proper men who always ready to point that out.  ”You’re sure enjoying that pie, aren’t you, big guy?”, etc.

Patsy’s Reflections are also of interest because for twenty years I worked in restaurants, doing everything from busing tables to washing dishes to finally chopping vegetables.  I used to have an upscale neighbor who when I told her what  I did for a living would invariably exclaim, perhaps a tad too kindly, “Oh, you’re a sous chef”.  Which I suppose is technically true, but I never had any ambition to be a professional cook, let alone a chief.  I never worked the line, I never wanted to work the line; there was too much pain and pressure there for my tastes.

But even before I became a professional for close to thirty years I cooked for myself because, as I once told someone,  nobody was sure as hell going to do it for me.  I wish my beloved Grandmother, God Rest Her Soul, had taught me even a tenth of what she knew about cooking, but, well, I was a boy, and it was never even discussed.  I did it without the benefit of your fancy cookbooks mostly through a process of hits and messes — i.e., I picked it up on the streets.  But I do wish I had  Patsy’s Reflections back then; you can treat it like some kind of a wonky novelty if you want,  but you should except the very real possibility you might learn something from it.

Soup is easy, comedy is hard.  My Grandmother, God Rest Her Soul, made the best soup in the world.  I often said, and genuinely meant, I would prefer eating her soup than anyone else’s steak.  But it took me nearly forty years of trial and error to figure out how to make a halfway decent pot of soup.  But then, I’m a slow learner; it took me nearly thirty to figure out how to properly scramble an egg; it’s always the simplest things that are the toughest to master.  I tend to judge restaurants on their soup, my thinking being, if they can’t get the soup right, what are the odds they’ll be able to do anything else?

My advice to you; make soup.  It will enrich your life.

I love fish , but have never really cooked a lot of it for myself, mostly because coming from an Eastern-European extraction fish wasn’t a regular part of the traditional diet. For me growing up it was mostly fish sticks (a.k.a. fish fingers in the UK; I still don’t know which term is sillier).  And when I got to be an adult there was always something daunting about cooking a non-frozen piece of fish, there was so many questions; how do you know when its done?  How do you know when it’s over done? All my answers are here:

Meat is messy, meat splatters, meat is expensive, so I never cooked a whole lot of meat in those thirty years.  Mostly I used to haunt the discount meat section and even now, working 40 hours a week it’s still usually beyond my budget.  I used to like to make meatloaf but I never quite got it right, and even my mother, a profoundly awful cook, could make a decent meatloaf.  She made hers with a ketchup glaze and green olives embedded on the top.  I tend to blame my failures on the fact that I never owned a proper meatloaf pan, but that’s just probably wishful thinking.

And, finally, here’s some whale recipes.  That’s right, whale.

 

 

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Election Cash: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons #101: Cartoons Magazine Centennial 1912

The Supreme Court having thrown Campaign Reform laws back one hundred years or more, we take a look at the influence of corporate money on elections, one century past, via the the editorial cartoons found in the September 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Above, the front cover, with inset cartoon by Harry J. Westerman.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Woodrow Wilson‘s refusal of Corporate money, depending instead on donations from individuals (whether he actually kept to that, I do not know). Cartoons by James E. Murphy, Charles Lewis Bartholomew (“Bart”), John Campbell Cory, Frank Michael Spangler, Alfred West Brewerton, and others.

Above, the Standard Oil Company attempting to bribe Teddy Roosevelt. From The Political Campaign of 1912 in Cartoons by Nelson Harding.

Below, cartoons by Camillus Kessler, Herbert H. Perry, and Robert Minor, Jr., accusing T.R. and the Progressive/Bull Moose Party of accepting corporate/trust money.

Beneath, cartoons by Charles MaCauley and others, showing President Taft vetoing bills that corporations wanted him to veto, with Congress sometimes overiding those vetoes.

Above, by Ryan Walker pictures a court ruled by money.

Below, a final page of corporate control. By Harry J. Westerman, Robert Minor, Jr., and others — including Favors Always for the Few, depicting John D. Rockefeller, J.P. Morgan, and the Corporate Trusts in general, riding atop the G.O.P. Elephant, which feeds them from a picnic basket labeled “Privilege”, while crushing the crowd of common workers beneath it feet.

To find prior episodes of this series,click on Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons. And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Financial Reform T.R. J.E. Murphy William Howard Taft James E. Murphy

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Up And Atom!

 

Now that  The Dark Knight Rises  seems to have finally ended its theatrical run (the DVD is coming soon, I’m sure!) we can move away from the 1966 Batman TV show which we’ve been exploiting for weeks and weeks, and get on to more pressing matters. Any old business? Any new business? Then it’s time to talk about Atom Ant!

What is there to say about Atom Ant? He’s an ant, so there’s that. He also seems to be atomic to some degree. I guess that about wraps it up!

Please enjoy the Atom Ant theme along with these images from Mr. Ant’s illustrious career.

 

 

 

 

Click the ant-sized image above for an atomic close-up

 

Click the link below to listen.

Atom Ant Show

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Tainted Food: Tigwissel Tuesdays # 37

In this week’s Tigwissel Tuesdays, we look at the dangers of consuming food, pre-F.D.A., as numerous Republican candidates have proudly declared that they would like to dismantle the Food & Drug Administration. As Mitt Romney might inelegantly phrase it when amongst his friends, Americans are too lazy to take responsibility for their own lives and test their own medicine & food themselves! Instead, these leeches upon society feel entitled to have government scientists do the testing for them! Well, with a Republican President and Congress, that come to an end! Every American will be able to taste Freedom! — (even if they can’t taste the germs) — by buying their own lab equipment to test their food, thus putting the American Lab Equipment Industry back to work! (unless they buy at Walmart — that stuff comes from overseas)!

Above, we see one such enterprising & freedom-loving individual, taking responsibility for his own Health, pre-F.D.A., in Frederick Burr Opper‘s front cover Puck magazine cartoon, Look Before You Eat, which appeared on March 12th, 1884.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read the text inside them.

Beneath, from the front cover of the January 7th, 1885 issue of Puck, we have artist Joseph Keppler, Sr.‘s take on the pre-F.D.A. selling of adulterated candy, which without any government regulations to stop them, the fine free-market capitalists of the day wisely filled out their candy with less expensive ingredients, such as chalk and a smidgeon of arsenic!

Below, from the same January 7th, 1885 Puck issue, is their editorial regarding the manufacturers & retailers of tainted candy.

Tainted milk. Above, by John Campbell Cory, from his 1920 book, Cartoonists’ Art. Below, from the September 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Finally, let’s not forget what deadly concoctions were literally sold as medicine, pre-F.D.A., in the below Harrison Cady cartoon, Advertising Pays, from a 1912 issue of Life magazine.

Doug Wheeler

NYPuck NYLife KepplerSr

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Shakin’ Shrinks # 742

 

 

 

Harvey Kurtzman’s Pot-Shot Pete rears his sillier-than-silly head yet again in the back of Jeff Overturf’s head.

http://jeffoverturf.blogspot.com/2012/09/pot-shot-pete-harvey-kurtzman-mad-monday.html

What was collecting like in the early seventies? Check out this issue of The Comic Reader, the Internet of its day.

http://randomactsofgeekery.blogspot.com/2012/09/fandom-library-comic-reader-95.html

Barry Pearl uncovers an early interview with Stan “the Man” Lee from a 1964 fanzine.

http://forbushman.blogspot.com/2012/09/crusader-fanzine-interview-1964-stan-lee.html

Finally, there’s no real info yet but I’ll be posting a contest later this week to win a copy of Craig’s new Creativity of Ditko. Stay tuned.

http://booksteveslibrary.blogspot.com/

 

 

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, September 24, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — The Adventures of Brick Bradford #96

Maybe because he was relatively obscure even during his heyday I’ve always had an interest in the comic strip Brick Bradford.  Oh he got some media attention, like a 1947 serial and some assorted merchandise, but in the hierarchy of science fiction comic strips Brick Bradford always ran a distant third behind Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers.  Or Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon if you preferred high concepts and gadgets over cool art and fabulous babes. Flash had other planets, Buck the future leaving Brick, who operated on present day earth, what little there was left; robots, subatomic worlds, dinosaurs, etc.  He was basically science fiction’s omnibus boy until 1937 when the Time Top was introduced and the all of time and space was his to play around in.

The New Zealand comic book The Adventures of Brick Bradford #96 seem to be running then contemporary strips and it dated 1953, so it seems likely these strips were written and drawn by original artist Clarence Gray and not his better known replacement Paul Norris.  It’s an exuberant (I really like the way Brick smiles at the reader in the first panel of these Sunday strips), well crafted strip that’s a bit better than it’s reputation would suggest.

 

And, quite by accident, I came across this cover to an issue of an Australian comic book that apparently reprinted the same sequence.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Monday, September 24, 2012

Women’s Suffrage, Loves, and Life: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, September 1912

From the September 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine, above, a set of Women’s Suffrage cartoons, by Fontaine Fox, J.E. Murphy, and Oscar Cesare.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Teddy Roosevelt shown courting the women’s vote (women could vote in the Presidential election in a handful of states in 1912, though nowhere near the majority). By cartoonists Gaar Williams, Charles Bowers, and others.

In addition to the cartoons concerning women and their struggle to gain the right to vote, the September 1912 issue was filled with plenty of other cartoons containing the 1912 male view of women. It is instructional to see these together — as they were at the time. It’s not as if Women’s Suffrage cartoons ran in isolation. Besides being largely against the cause, as well as neutral but dismissive, many of the other cartoons concerning women could be belittling, running counter to the few times that a pro-Women’s Rights cartoon appeared.

Above, by Luther D. Bradley, Fontaine Fox again, and Ralph Everett Wilder, cartoons depicting women having to deal with aggressive “mashers”.

Below, by Frank Michael Spangler, Fox, and Wilder, more.

Above, commentary on women’s fashions (and men’s reaction), by Clive Weed, Bradley, Fox, and Wilder.

Below, cartoonist Harry J. Westerman‘s depiction of “World Champion Dunce”, the Reverend Elmer Huffner, pastor of the First Christian Church of God, in Grand Junction, Colorado, who delivered a sermon calling for the exile of all “Old Maids”. (Clicking on Huffner’s name will bring you to a Syracuse Journal newspaper page containing not only that story, but numerous jaw dropping items of the time.)

Next, romance, by Billy DeBeck, and Fox yet again.

Above, still more by Bradley, Fox, and others, on the relationship of the sexes.

Below, DeBeck, George W. French, Gaar Williams, and Herbert H. Perry.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Women’s History James E. Murphy

Doug
Doug

SUBSCRIBE