Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » July
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for July, 2012

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: The Lighter Side of The Dark Knight

With The Dark Knight Rises still showing in packed theaters, it’s certainly appropriate to spotlight Batman two Tuesdays in a row. Of course, with that bright spotlight shining on him, Batman can hardly be dark, can he?

I thought we’d focus this time on the Batmobile, since it’s the one thing conspicuously absent from the new film. Bat-cycles are fine, and Bat-planes have their place, but nothing beats The Batmobile for sheer automotive coolness!

 

 

 

Click the images above for a better view

 

And this wouldn’t be Comics Tunes Tuesday without a song. So click the link below to listen to “Here Comes The Batmobile”!

 

Here Comes the Batmobile

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Mr. Golightly’s Steam Riding Rocket, c1840s: Tigwissel Tuesdays #30

Above, The Flight of Intellect. Portrait of Mr. Golightly experimenting on Messrs Quick and Speeds’ new patent high pressure Steam Riding Rocket. By artist George Edward Madeley, and published by Charles Tilt, most sources estimate this cartoon to have originally been published circa 1830.

Some web sources, though — such as the blog site Voyages Extraordinaires, Scientific Romances in a Bygone Age, which is following its own path covering Victorian Science, similar to our own Tigwissel Tuesdays but not as concentrated on cartoons — propound that “Mr. Golightly” was an actual person, Charles Golightly. According to the afore-mentioned website (which, by the way, has color versions of the above and below cartoons), “In 1841, the English Mr. Golightly took out the patent for an aerial steam rocket, intended for personal aeronautic use.” If true, then obviously the usual “circa 1830″ date given for the above cartoon, is a decade too early.

However, I have serious doubts concerning the veracity of Charles Golightly having been real. While some people are named “Golightly”, the odds of someone by that name having patented a fantasy personal rocket in 1841, is highly unlikely. The name smacks of satire. Plus, my own guess at the date before I’d seen others’, was late 1820s to 1830s, based on what I’ve seen from that period. My own searches (limited to the incomplete resources of the internet) have not found any references to “Golightly” combined with “rocket”, other than cartoon references. None of the sites propounding that Charles Golightly was real, offer where that information came from. As we here at Tigwissel Tuesdays know, our own namesake character has been the subject of misinformation for decades, due to one person making an unsubstantiated statement, followed by a great many who, not bothering to do research themselves, simply repeated that misinformation, until it became a widely repeated “fact”.

But one of the biggest doubts, is raised by the British publication Picture Magazine, which reprinted the above cartoon in 1893, and from whose pages I scanned this image. Click on the image, to see what Picture Magazine had to say about it: “This is one of the innumerable skits which appeared at the time of the introduction of Railways, and is specially directed against Stephenson’s first locomotive, ‘The Rocket’.” Robert Stephenson’s Rocket locomotive was built in 1829.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

This image of a man riding a rocket, was copied numerous times by other cartoonists, some of whom acknowledged the original source. Each of the cartoons below, come from the Library of Congress website. Each of these, involve Mr. Golightly as a gold prospecter, using his rocket to race to the California gold fields, in the Gold Rush of 1849. Clicking on the titles of the titles of these cartoons, will take you to the Library of Congress site for that picture. Clicking on the pictures here, will enlarge them.

Below, Mr. Golightly, Bound to California. His words — difficult to make out even in the enlarged view, are, “I wish Jemima could see me now, goin through the Firmament like a streak of greased lightnin on a Telegraph wire; I guess she’d feel a sorter vexed that she didn’t pack up her fixins and go long — When I get to Californy I’ll let others do the diggins while I do the swappins!”

Above, close-up of Mr. Golightly, from the top left of the below 1849 broadsheet cartoon, The Way They Go To California, by artist Nathaniel Currier.

Below, from the Oakland Museum of California, we find another Nathaniel Currier broadsheet cartoon — Grand Patent India-Rubber Air Line Railway to California.

A group of “passengers” are shown, sitting upon a rubber band, which apparently stretches all the way from West to East Coast. While behind them, a worker chops at the East Coast end, to send the passengers on their way to California! In the distance, top left of the cartoon, we see Mr. Golightly making his own way to California.

Lead Passenger: “It looks awful foggy ahead, yet I think I see something shiney at the other end. Bless me he is cutting away. When it goes, I hope it won’t jerk my head off.”

Next Passenger: “If that chap don’t mind his eye, I’ll larn him.”

Third Passenger: “Hold on tight, he is going to cut…”

Fourth Passenger: “O Lord deliver us from evil!”

Sixth Passenger: “Och! Teddy darlint don’t ye feel quare to be sthraddlin a sthring?”

Fifth Passenger: “Faix an I do, Judy; but howld on tight as we’ll sthraddle the lumps of gould ferment the whole pack of thim.”

Seventh Passenger: “Who’s Afraid, I ain’t.”

Eight Passenger: “What a peeples! What a peeples!”

Worker, Cutting: “One, two, three, four and five, off they go all alive.”

The Museum of California website lists what the text along the bottom says.

Finally, after writing above, I found this posting about the Mr. Golightly cartoons, at io9.com, where author Ron Miller has not only posted three additional Golightly cartoons than we have here (plus some alternate hand-colored versions), but, raises further doubts about the questionable existence of a “Charles Golightly”. It frankly sounds to me that the 1841 British patent, was entered as a prank by someone familiar with the earliest cartoon versions.

Next week, more up-to-the century (or older) comic scientific developments, from Tigwissel Tuesdays!

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Monday, July 30, 2012

Good Ol’ Days: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, July 1912, Part 11

We close the July 1912 review of Cartoons Magazine‘s Centennial Year, with a potpourri of Old Time Toons.

Above, Fontaine Fox making fun of the Ice Delivery Man — from a time when daily delivered blocks of ice, was how ice boxes (home refrigerators) “worked”.

Below, James H. Donahey and others, on modern romance…

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, kids and summer vacation, by Clare Briggs, R.D. Handy, Fontaine Fox again, and more.

Below, Billy DeBeck, on the trap for customers, set by those running summer boarding houses.

Doug Wheeler

SummerVacation

Doug
Doug

Monday, July 30, 2012

Stompin’ Savoys # 722

 The Cincinnati Comic Expo guest list keeps getting better–Perez! Royer! Bissette! Totleben! Veitch! Russell! Yeates! Englehart! Boldman! Portacio! Darrow! Dorman! And more!

http://cincinnaticomicexpo.com/

Daily Splash Page is just what it sounds like and so much fun! Check it out!

http://dailysplashpage.blogspot.com/

Here’s the second of apparently four parts of a Sunday Funnies collection.

http://jeffoverturf.blogspot.com/2012/07/sunday-funnies-march-12-1960-part-2-of-4.html

Finally, here’s the great 1977 DC calendar in large scans that would make good PC wallpaper!

http://mycomicboardbanners.blogspot.com/2012/07/set-wayback-machine-sherman-3.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Sunday, July 29, 2012

Passing of Party Bosses (yeah, right): Cartoons Magazine Centennial, July 1912, Part 10

From the July 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine — optimistic exhuberance about how, in 1912, the introduction of direct voting for candidates in primary, would lead to the elimination of Party Bosses ignoring the voters, and nominating who the establishment wanted. Of course, we still have Party Operatives, who influence results, albeit slightly more subtly.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions and text.

Amongst the Cartoonists are Charles Bowers and W.A. Ireland (above); Norman Ritchie and Ole May (below).

Beneath, extracted from The Political Campaign of 1912 in Cartoons, by Nelson Harding.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Billy Ireland

Doug
Doug

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Waiter’s Strike: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, July 1912, Part 9

Above, the largest crisis to hit the world in 1912, was apparently the New York City Waiter’s Strike!

Or at least, the cartoons gathered together in the two pages above — from the July 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine — are simply too interesting to skip over…

Amongst the cartoonists traumatized at the thought of being prevented from eating out, are: Cy Hungerford, Boardman Robinson, and Sanglier.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Ishin’ Kabibbles # 721

 

 Batman and Robin in their strangest team-up of all as they meet swing band leader and radio quiz host Kay Kyser in 1948.

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2012/07/batman-meets-kay-kyser-dick.html

Speaking of wacky team-ups, here’s the Man of Steel and the Substitute Legion as they encounter Ambush Bug.

http://mailittoteamup.blogspot.com/2012/07/dc-comics-presents-to-z-dc-comics_28.html

And while we’re on wacky, here’s some more of the rare newspaper strip version of Siegel and Shuster’s Funnyman.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2012/07/a-funny-thing.html

After all that wackiness, let’s end up with a classic two-fisted tale from Kurtzman and Wood,

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2012/07/trial-by-arms-by-wally-wood.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, July 27, 2012

Olympic Games: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, July 1912, Part 8

For Opening Day of the London Olympics, we have a few cartoons from the July 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Above, Uncle Sam, tired of the dirty sport of politics, looks forward to a diversion of the “clean sports” of the Olympics.

Below, a rather racist cartoon involving Native American athlete, Jim Thorpe.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in greater detail.

Below, Suffragettes shown as Olympic athletes, parodying the (then) recent trend of (a few) Women’s Suffrage advocates taking on the tactics of modern anarchists — smashing shop windows with bricks.

We’ll have a much larger group of Olympic cartoons — and ones not as tangential as these — for the day of the Closing Ceremonies.

Doug Wheeler

Sports Women’s History NativeAmericanHistory

Doug
Doug

Friday, July 27, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Comic Revue #2 Hap Hopper

Most of us know, if only by reputation, the usual suspect list of famous old comic strips.  But the wonderful thing is, for every one of those there was a full dozen  of others you’ve probably never heard of, which have disappeared without a trace.  Which is why we owe a profound ‘thank you’ to the Golden Age comic book for providing us ample evidence strips like Hap Hopper, Foreign Correspondent  ever existed.

In 1947 St. John published five issues of Comics Revue, each issue featured a single comic strip from the United Features Syndicate.  Ella Cinders and Gordo are probably obscure enough for most of you but me being me, I naturally go for the really obscure ones, ones I never expected  to ever actually get the chance to read.  Like Iron Vic (the superhero turned baseball player, don’t worry, I’ll get around to him) and, Hap Hopper.

Launching in 1940 Hap Hopper was a fairly conventional strip about a two-fisted reporter who had to deal with editor Rushmore Newes and girlfriend Holly Woode (puns are fun) along with the usual compliment of crooks and spies.  It was written by William Laas and drawn by Jack Sparling, who’s best known for his, um, distinctive art style on such 60′s comic books as Pirana and The Secret Six.  Sparling left the strip in 1942 (though some sources say ’43) and  was replaced by Al Plastino, so I can not say with any confidence who exactly drew the sequence reprinted here.

Maybe it’s just me but it sure seems like Hap was supposed to look more than a little like actor Van Johnson; I mean, check out the elevation on that puffy pompadour of his.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Nelson Harding’s 1912 “A Political Primer”, G thru K

Today, part two of artist Nelson Harding‘s ABC book parody, “A Political Primer”, making fun of Teddy Roosevelt. Found within the magazine-sized booklet, The Political Campaign of 1912 in Cartoons, collecting Harding’s cartoons published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics William Randolph Hearst

Doug
Doug

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