Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » June
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for June, 2012

Saturday, June 30, 2012

European Cartoons: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, June 1912, Part 13

We conclude our review of the June 1912 edition of Cartoons Magazine, with samples of the European cartoons found within.

Above, French humor publication Le Rire, depicts the roughly three month 1912 trip of Prince Edward, Prince of Wales, in France.

Below, commentary involving Americans, from Italy, France, and Hungary.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above & below, German police dogs, and Italian militarism.

Above, a fallen aviationist, by Emile Villemot.

Beneath, W.K. Haselden on art appreciation.

From art appreciation, to the stage. Above, cartoons by Frederick Townsend. Below, a variety, from Britain, France, and Denmark.

Doug Wheeler

LeRire JournalAmusant Meggendorfer Blatter Simplicissimus BritPunch Pele Mele TheatricalCartoons

Doug
Doug

Friday, June 29, 2012

Birth of the Bull Moose Party, 1912 Republican National Convention, Part 5: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, July 1912, Part 0.5

Breaking news, on the 1912 Presidential Election! The establishment G.O.P. Party Machinery, having chosen current President William Howard Taft as 1912 Republican nominee for the White House, in spite of the larger following amongst the Party, and the people generally, for former President Theodore Roosevelt, T.R. has decided to break with the Republican establishment, and form a new political party — the Progressive Party, labeled soon after as the Bull Moose Party! Because, after all, how would cartoonists parody them, without an animal mascot?!

Above, a German view of American events, in the publication Kladderadatsch, posing whether Teddy has taken A Juicy Bite — Or More Than He Could Chew?

Below, William Kemp Starrett on the birth of “The Grand New Party”The Teddy Bear Party — to the personal glory of Teddy Roosevelt. Teddy’s parade is complete with defecting Party Machine Bosses, ex-Republican Presidents, and the switching of sides of a few monopolies/trusts. Beneath that, Bromstrup of the San Francisco Post, and Charles Bowers, depict the Republican “Bolt” — i.e., the huge number G.O.P. delegates, who walked out of the Republican Convention, calling for the formation of a new political party.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, a page of cartoons on the birth of the as-yet-named third party. Cartoonists above include James H. Donahey and John Campbell Cory.

Beneath, the first cartoons (that made it into Cartoons Magazine, at least) referring directly to a Teddy’s new party, as a “Bull Moose”. Both cartoons by “Tad” Dorgan.

Keep Up-to-the-Century on breaking news — with Super I.T.C.H.! This moment has been brought to you from the July 1912 edition of Cartoons Magazine.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Health Care

Today being the Supreme Court’s ruling on Health Care, I’ve quick thrown together a few related cartoons.

Above, artist Syd Hoff‘s take on the Supreme Court, from his 1935 Great Depression I era book, The Ruling Clawss, collecting samples of his cartoons previously published in The Daily Worker.

Click on the above & below cartoons, to enlarge them, and view them in greater detail.

Beneath, with art by Dan Napoli, an insurance ad for World War I soldiers and their families, run in Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine, issue 5. I’m not quite certain whether this booklet was published during the war, or slightly after, but it’s one of the earlier titles amongst pamphlets sold by disabled & unemployed WW I veterans, to help support themselves.

The above & beneath cartoons come from separate issues of the unemployed WW I veterans’ pamphlet sereies, titled My Buddie Boy Wit and Goodwill In and Out of Hospital. The above is from the rear cover of issue 4, while below is from the rear cover of an unnumbered issue. A black & white version of the same beneath art, was used as the front cover on another pamphlet.

Above, Life in a Big Hospital, from inside another unemployed & disabled WW I veterans booklet — Doughboys’ Fun and Facts In and Out of Service.

While below, from Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine number 5, artist Jimmy Meehan depicts a wealthy war profiteer, who wants an unemployed veteran removed from his sight before he feels too much sympathy for him.

Since our conservative activist Supreme Court has in so many recent rulings sought to return the U.S. to pre-Teddy Roosevelt 19th century Robber Barons days, I felt it appropriate to throw in a few early 19th century cartoons, when the rich truly behaved as royalty, ruling the masses with wealth, and the power they purchased it with.

The above & below images come from the third issue of the American Scraps, self-published in 1832 by artist David Claypoole Johnston. In “The Test of Friendship” above, the “test” is the righteousness of not helping a friend get up; below, Claypoole’s version of “A Fit of the Blue Devils” (being sick), obviously “inspired” (ahem) by a very similar, earlier Cruikshank cartoon.

Finally, below, the first three panels from artist William Heath‘s serialized series, Essay on Modern Medical Education. The series (along with several others) ran in Heath’s cartoon sheet publication, Glasgow Looking Glass. These panels are from issue Six, August 18th, 1825. Since I’ve now begun the series, I guess I should continue it — just as I’m sure the Health Care debate in this country, will continue.

Doug Wheeler

LookingGlass

Doug
Doug

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Calmin’ Down # 712

 

 

A Facebook friend pointed me toward this fascinating project,  a somewhat scholarly study of Arthurian legends in graphic stories.

http://arthur-of-the-comics-project.blogspot.com/

Here’s some atypical Tom Sutton artwork (as well as script) on one of Skywald’s rare color titles of the early seventies, Butch Cassidy.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2012/06/bring-on-back-ups-butch-cassidy-in.html

Congrats to Daniel Best on his 1000th post, celebrated with a reprinting of Jerry Siegel’s original fanzine story, Reign of the Super-man.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2012/06/1933s-reign-of-superman-first-superman.html

Finally today, here’s a fun review of Craig’s news Frazetta volume from our own Beth Davies-Stofka.

http://www.comicbookbin.com/frazetta623.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Good Ol’ Days: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, June 1912, Part 12

For today, a potpourri from the June 1912 edition of Cartoons Magazine, on the wonders of our modern age! (Minus, roughly, a century…)

Above, by John T. McCutcheon, The New Neighbors, having their belongings transported by a modern moving van with spoke-wheeled tires, rather than the traditional horse-and-wagon. Note also, the very latest in musical players!

Below, by Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling, a comparison of the antiquated method of keeping one’s foodstuff cool, versus the modern convenience of today’s icebox, whereby you keep your food in a wooden cabinet, “powered” by placing a large block of ice inside it daily…

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, the joys of Going Green, with everyone having their own backyard food garden, by Ole May, Frank Michael Spangler, Frederick Townsend, and more.

Beneath, Fontaine Fox, William Charles Morris, and a couple other civic-minded cartoonists, encouraging the latest techniques for fighting epidemics and disease! Of course, we all know that the other side regards this as socialist government control of our lives — dictating to us all what to do with the flies that God Himself has blessed us with!

Doug Wheeler

BritPunch

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Sneakin’ Back # 711

 

A few months back, I discovered the joys of John Stanley’s Clyde Crashcup comics of the early sixties. Seems to be catching.

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2012/06/clyde-crashcup-3.html

The non-Schulz comic book Peanuts strips are pretty fun, also, and here are some nifty 1958 examples.

http://themagicwhistle.blogspot.com/2012/06/peanuts-2.html

Unlike Schulz, Walt Kelly really did do his own Pogo comics and they were some of the best comics of their day so let’s take a look at some.

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2012/06/number-1182-chilluns-ought-to-be-seed.html

Finally, on a different note, the always fascinating RC Harvey revisits Zack Mosley’s once-famous Smilin’ Jack.

http://www.tcj.com/smilin-zack-mosleys-wilder-blue-yonder/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Professor Tigwissel’s Journalistic Venture, January 15th, 1876: Tigwissel Tuesdays #25

Above, from the front page of the January 15th, 1876 edition of the (New York) Daily Graphic, comes the ninth appearance of this series’ favorite recurring comic strip character, Professor Tigwissel.

In Professor Tigwissel’s Journalistic Venture, creator/artist Livingston Hopkins breaks form by having Tigwissel engaged in a non-scientific activity — newspaper editor.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view them in detail, and read their captions.

Hopkins was recruited away from his native U.S. to move to Australia, and become a regular contributor to the weekly humor paper, Sydney Bulletin. In an effort to determine if Hopkins might have continued to produce Professor Tigwissel episodes in Australia, I searched the first several years of the Sydney Bulletin. While I found no new Tigwissel episodes, I did find instances in which Hopkins drew characters which looked remarkably like Tigwissel, but were neither scientists, nor had the character’s name. Below, in A Little Hint to Contributors , Livingston Hopkins depicts an editor about to release a bulldog upon a poet, who is approaching the editor with a pile of his work. From May 19th, 1883, this is amongst the earliest of Hopkins’ cartoons published in the Bulletin.

Beneath, we find Parts One & Two of The Boogeebung Boomerang, appearing together in the March 15th, 1884 edition of the Sydney Bulletin. A comparison of it to Hopkins’ Tigwissel episode of eight years prior, shows that Hopkins re-used the art from that prior episode for his new Australian audience, who likely never saw the NYC-published original. Hopkins recycled his own Daily Graphic work for re-use in the Sydney Bulletin on several other occasionsdid this on other occasions — click here to view how yet another Tigwissel episode was altered for replay to his Australian audience. In The Boogeebung Boomerang below, Hopkins has slightly re-arranged the order of panels in the story, plus changed the accompanying text.

The Professor’s tenth adventure will appear here, in two weeks. Meanwhile, you can click on Tigwissel Tuesdays to view prior episodes in this series.

Doug Wheeler

ProfTigwissel NYDailyGraphic

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Call for Super Chicken

 

In honor of the 45th anniversary of the debut of Super Chicken on the George of the Jungle show, we now present the memorable theme song. Remember it?

Click the link below to enjoy this classic song. Sing along!

 

Super Chicken

 

David B
DJ David B.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Baseball: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, June 1912, Part 11

From June 1912 — back in the days when baseball actually was “America’s Favorite Pastime”, and a favorite topic of America’s cartoonists — come the following Cartoons Magazine extracts. My usual “and others” for contributions by lesser cartoonists not being tracked, does not even appear today, as all the contributors are stars.

Above left, kids keeping hold of the integrity of baseball, against the adults (right), who in 1912 were embroiled in the scandal of fixed games. Warning against gambling in the sport, is Boardman Robinson, while spotlighting the kids’s view, are James H. Donahey, A.B. Chapin, and Robert Ripley, six years before his first Believe It or Not!. This is Ripley’s first appearance in Cartoons Magazine. Of possible interest is the title of the cartoon positioned next to Ripley’s — “Truth is Stranger Than Fiction”. Any chance that this might have been a subtle seed-planting moment, as the young Robert Ripley, early in his career, undoubtedly looked upon the page of his first appearance collected amongst so many other fellow cartoonists, including the one placed next to his?

Below, the Winter Coal Trust replaced with the Summer Ice Trust, in a cartoon by Billy Ireland, using baseball to take a swing at monopolies. Beneath that — slipping in here because I didn’t pay enough attention to separate this page’s cartoons by subject — is another cartoon on rigged commodity markets, this time by Frank Michael Spangler.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

W.A. Ireland

Doug
Doug

Monday, June 25, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Huckleberry Hound Weekly

Here’s an interesting oddity, a early 60′s issue of Huckleberry Hound Weekly from the UK.  Previously I’ve expressed my love for the output of the Hanna-Barbara Studio in general and Huck in particular.  So it was a genuine pleasure seeing this random issue full of some really nice art (which I’m going to go ahead and assume was done by Hanna-Barbara artists for the international market).  Most of the their major players from around 1963 are here including some now fairly obscure ones like Touche Turtle and Loopy de Loop.

It’s kind of funny, in a sad, cheap  jack, the way the British editors desperately tried to turn this into the “Easter issue” mostly through the strength of pasting typewritten text (!) over Huck’s word balloon on the cover.  Too cheap to spring for lettering…that’s just how cheap British comics could get.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

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