Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » April
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for April, 2012

Monday, April 30, 2012

International Affairs: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 23

Closing out our run of the fourth issue of Cartoons MagazineApril 1912 — we have a collection of cartoons covering various foreign affair subjects.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, a set concerning the Panama Canal, which was still under construction, overseen by the U.S. Below, the tensions between Britain and Germany, seen as rivals for World Domination.

Above, William Charles Morris on the variety of troubles hitting Great Britain. Below, Hy Mayer regarding the Mexican Revolution, and R.D. Handy on the shakiness of the new Chinese Republic.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Monday, April 30, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Grit Grady Comics #1

The first thing that you need to know about Grit Grady Comics  is there is no Grit Grady Comics.  It doesn’t exist.  What does exist  is Holyoke One-Shot#1, the first  in a ‘series’ of ten oddball reprint comics published in 1944-45.  These One-Shots featured reprints of material originally published by Holyoke (and their various affiliated comic book companies), a publisher based in, naturally enough, Holyoke, Massachusetts.  They were best known, in usual suspect comic book circles anyway, for characters like Cat-Man, Strongman and Captain Aero.

I say ‘oddball’ because they were 36 pages, roughly half the length of a comic book at that time, and instead of a glossy cover they had a semi-glossy one.  Making them look for all the world like the coverless comic books I used to buy at a disreputable used book store back in Akron, Ohio back when I was a kid.

The other thing decidedly oddball about these comics is their contents were a jumbled mess; the interiors most  often had absolutely nothing to do with the covers.  For instance Holyoke One-Shot #1 features stories  of  Sgt. Dick Carter of the U.S. Border Patrol, Miss Victory, Diamond Jim. Corporal Rusty Dugan, Alias X  (and assorted text pieces), but, alas, no Grit Grady.  There’s just, inexplicably serving as its cover, the first page of the Grit Grady story originally published in (bless you, Grand Comic Book Database, and all those who sail upon you) Captain Fearless  Comics #2.

Which is a damn shame because I really, really want there to have been a Grit Grady comic.  I’m not entirely sure why, maybe because the name Grit Grady sounds so much like a 30′s adventure comic strip that ran in small town newspapers who couldn’t afford Terry and the Pirates or Captain Easy.   And there’s something wonderfully, horribly primitive about the art — that cover especially  looks to me like something cranked out of Andy Warhol’s Factory

So I took the cover  to Holyoke One-Shot #1 and a story from #5 and created Grit Grady #1,  a previously imaginary title.  I have done this because, as so many authority figures have inferred over the decades, I am not entirely ‘right’.  And, full disclosure, I can’t promise this won’t be the only imaginary comic that will ever appear in Comic Book Compulsive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Broad Brush: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 22

From the April 1912 fourth issue of Cartoons Magazine, we present a few pages of miscellaneous topics.

Above, Absolutely the Worst Yet by Fontaine Fox, on the difficulties of dealing with the modern day phone switch operator…

Beneath, two problems actually little changed from 1912, one illustrated by H.T. Webster, and the other by Vie Lambdin.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt, Part 2: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 21

Today’s round of Teddy Roosevelt cartoons — the second set this month from the April 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine — all deal with T.R.’s going back on his earlier words, that he wouldn’t run for a third term.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Amongst those cartoonists “taking a jab” at T.R., are W.A. Rogers and Clifford K. Berryman (both above), and, (below), Richard Keith Culver (illustrator of “The Roosevelt Bears”, Teddy B. and Teddy G. ).

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Losin’ Streaks # 691

 

 

Ever wonder about the brain of artist Dan DeCarlo? Well, here he is–the Brain, by Dan DeCarlo.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2012/04/no-brainer-friay-comic-book-day.html

Never seen this one before–a Good Girl Art strip from Jack Sparling of all people–and from the seventies–with a link to even more!

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2012/04/charlton-cheesecake.html

Here’s a few lovely vintage Sunday Archie strips from the great Bob Montana.

http://www.libraryofamericancomics.com/blog/article/2285/

Finally, off-topic, please check out my own personal Kickstarter project and support it if you can. Thanx!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/603655558/a-geeks-journal-1976-the-book-of-the-blog

 

 

 

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, April 27, 2012

Focus on European Cartoons, Part 2: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 20

Today, a second set of cartoons from Europe, extracted by and from the April 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on the above & below cartoons, to view them in larger detail.

Cartoons involving alcohol are popular everywhere, as shown above and below, in cartoons from England and Denmark.

Above & below, more from France, Germany, and England.

Doug Wheeler

JournalAmusant Simplicissimus LondonSketch ParisFigaro

Doug
Doug

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The Court Room Killing of Judge Massie: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 19

If ever there was a poster case for why it’s not always a good idea to allow individuals to carry guns into every single place on Earth they feel entitled to, it is the March 13th, 1912 trial of Virginian hothead, Floyd Allen. The details of why Allen was on trial can be found by clicking on his name, but, like something out of a Clint Eastwood Western, when Floyd Allen was informed in court that he’d been found guilty, he point blank eyed the judge — Thornton L. Massie — and told him, “If you sentence me on that verdict, I will kill you.”

Judge Massie proceeded to sentence him on that verdict, upon which Floyd Allen pulled out his gun, triggering a crossfire of bullets involving the numerous people in court who were armed. (And, yes — the person being tried was permitted to carry a gun at his trial!) In addition to Allen, many members of Allen’s family — most of them also armed — were in the courtroom. Judge Massie, the head of the Jury (who announced the verdict), the prosecuting attorney, the county sheriff, and a bystander, were all killed. Seven others — including Floyd Allen — were wounded.

The above cartoon (bottom right) listing the dead, contains an error — court clerk Dexter Goad (amongst the armed & shooting) was not killed, but only wounded (hit four times!), and testified in the trials that followed. Floyd Allen was executed one year later, in March 1913. The biggest name among the cartoonists above is Clifford K. Berryman.

Click on the above picture, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Thursday, April 26, 2012

***WIN FRAZETTA-FUNNY STUFF***

Thanks to Craig Yoe and IDW I find myself with an extra copy of Yoe Books’ just out today FRAZETTA-FUNNY STUFF, a thick, hardcover, full color collection of funny animal and other humor tales and illustrations by the man acknowledged as the master fantasy artist of the late twentieth century. With a strong biographical piece by Yoe, illustrated with more rare art, as well as a truly bizarre introduction by animator Ralph Bakshi, this book is a fifty dollar value that can be yours for free–no purchase necessary! 

All you have to do to be eligible is to read and comment on any one post on any one of my eleven blogs! Here’s one now! http://booksteveslibrary.blogspot.com/ It can be a current post or one from 2006. Doesn’t matter. You read, leave a comment and include the word “FRITZ” (how Frank signed his name in many of these early stories) and your email address and you’ll be entered to win! Entries will be gathered from all the email notifications I get over the next few days and the winner of the FRAZETTA-FUNNY STUFF book will be contacted next Monday, the 29th of April, and announced and mailed out later in the week. Multiple comments get you multiple entries (with a limit of 4). 
As with all Yoe Books, this is one impressively designed volume. I particularly like the barcode on the back cover! I did some behind the scenes research for this one and later proofread it so I’m not going to offer an actual review except to say that if you’re a fan of Frank Frazetta, there’s some surprisingly good stuff here that you’ve most likely never seen before. If you don’t win the book, buy the book. It’s worth the price. 

Official Press Release
Frank Frazetta has been called “The Grand Master of Fantasy Art,” but did you know he did a glorious omnibus’ worth of funny sexy and funny cute stories in the Golden Age of comic books?! That’s right, hillbilly babes to hoppy bunnies were drawn with the Frazetta magic. And Eisner-winning editor Craig Yoe captures that magic in the new FRAZETTA—FUNNY STUFF large format, full-color, 256-page hardcover collection from Yoe Books. FRAZETTA—FUNNY STUFF debuts at the MoCCA Fest in New York City this weekend and will be in comic book shops this week.
Yoe says, “Besides the amazing art itself, Frazetta fans will be stoked by the sheer quantity in this big thick book. There are 27 comic book stories, well over 200 of The Master’s delightful text illustrations, and tons of rare and unpublished original art, illustrations and photos carefully reproduced in the introduction.”
Frazetta’s “Fire and Ice” collaborator Ralph Bakshi provides a compelling freeform, stream of consciousness introduction that you have to read to believe. Dig the beatnik beats of this hep cat sharing his story of working with THE MAN. Only Craig Yoe can conjure up such wild and unexpected material!
“The team at Yoe Books put countless hours in restoring these charming strips to ensure a proper vintage reading experience,” said IDW Senior Book Editor, Justin Eisinger. “Like each and every Yoe Book, FRAZETTA—FUNNY STUFF is a lovingly created artifact that itself is a piece of art.”
But don’t just take our word for the glory of this vintage Frazetta. Here’s what some fine, respectable folks have to say about the man and his funny work.
“Frank Frazetta… his comic book output was unforgettable!” —Harvey Kurtzman
“You don’t have a full picture of Frank Frazetta until you’ve seen his funny stuff. It was his own favorite work, as it captured an important aspect of Frank that his sword and sorcery paintings did not—his warm sense of humor.” —William Stout
Why stop there?! Even the great talent himself was known to claim that the funny side was the real Frazetta.
“I do reveal that dark side in some of my work. I am known for my violent stuff. But the funny stuff is the real me.” —Frank Frazetta
Pappy’s Golden Age Blogzine says that FRAZETTA—FUNNY STUFF is “a long overdue compilation! The book is beautifully produced. I love the over-sized pages, and especially the enlarged spot illustrations. As always, Craig’s books are impeccably designed and printed. Permanent binding, thick quality paper to ensure the best reproduction possible. You will never go wrong buying a book with the Yoe Books imprint.”
Keep an eye out for the limited edition as well. A hot ticket item at 100 copies, it features a bookplate signed by Yoe as well as a variant cover featuring a rare drawing of one of Frazetta’s much-lauded sexy gals!
Craig Yoe is available for convention appearances and interviews with the press in regards to this and his other books. Yoe Books’ website is yoebooks.com
FRAZETTA—FUNNY STUFF ($49.99, 256 pages, hard cover, full color) will be available Wednesday, April 25, 2012. ISBN 978-1-61377-167-9.
Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Huckleberry Hound Summer Fun

As previously established when I was a kid I completely leap frogged over ‘kids comics’ and dove straight for superheroes, specifically, my brothers (God rest his soul).  When it came to comic books I was a superhero or nothing sort of kid; you couldn’t get me to try any other kind.   Which is kind of strange, seeing as how I also had a mad, desperate love for the cartoon output of the Hanna-Barbara Studio.  Laugh if you will but their characters were once close personal friends of a strange, lonely fat kid.  How strange and lonely?  For my 8th birthday my Mother threw me a birthday party–my only guest, Jake, the neighbor’s dog (somewhere there’s a photo of him wearing a party hat).  I loved all of them,from Peter Potamus  to Frankenstein Jr., but my first cartoon friend was Hanna-Barbara’s first cartoon star;  Huckleberry Hound.

When you stop to think about it a blue hound dog with a Southern drawl was a fairly unusual character to headline his own TV cartoon show back in the late 1950′s.  Plus Huck was not exactly what you would call a high energy performer; soft spoken and thoughtful, he always held himself with a certain kind of quiet grace.  Which, in retrospect was at least part of his appeal –that and the fact he always seemed to be speaking directly to me.  Other Hanna-Barbara characters routinely broke the fourth wall but usually only to deliver a sly “look how cool I’m being” aside.  Huck, through his running commentary, let us all on his little secret; he had no idea how he was going to get out of his current predicament either.

The Huckleberry Hound Show was the first animated TV show to win an Emmy and although incredibly popular at  the time it’s now mostly remembered, when it’s remembered at all, as the vehicle from where Yogi Bear sprung.  If  Huck was H-B’s first star Yogi was their first real cartoon superstar; he completely eclipsed Huck’s popularity.  And with no apparent resentment Huck stepped aside, allowing himself to become just another one of the ‘gang’ of b-listers who populated the various H-B cartoon ensemble ’ shows from the 70′s to the 90′s. From the profoundly awful ‘pro-social’  Yogi’s Gang to Yogi’s Space Race  to the ‘greed is good’ Yogi’s Treasure Hunt, he reliably played both second fiddle and banana to (you guessed it) Yogi Bear.

He deserved so much better.

As you know I eventually became mature enough to enjoy the antics of ducks and mice and teens, but there are still vast holes in my comic book knowledge — funny animals, for instance.  All I know about this fun 1960 issue of Dell Giants is that the Grand Comic Book Database (all bow down before it) says that the prolific funny animal artist Harvey Eisenberg drew the cover.  Even in my deepest, darkest superhero days I remember leafing through the pages of the Overstreet Price Guide and looking at beautiful covers like this. I would pause and sigh, thinking  I would never get the chance to read these comics.   How little I knew.

There are no credits given for any of the stories, but I really like this one.

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

F.D.A.: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons # 88 / Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 18

The Food & Drug Administration is amongst several government agencies which extremists within the G.O.P. are calling to be eliminated. On March 15th, 1912, Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley — who both headed & helped create the agency — resigned in the face of continuing opposition orchestrated by moneyed interests who would have preferred to continue the kinds of dangerous food adulteration we see frequently occuring today in Communist China.

Click on the above picture, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

The cartoons above all refer to Wiley’s resignation, and his honorable service within a corrupted administration in the pocket of monopolists. Rollin Kirby‘s cartoon, above, refers to attacks on Wiley by newspaper editors, while Robert Minor, Jr.‘s cartoon depicts him as Lot, fleeing the Taft’s city of sin.

Click here to find Wiley’s prior appearance in Cartoons Magazine.

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

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