Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » March
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for March, 2012

Saturday, March 31, 2012

Party Control of Primary Results: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 1

We get an early start today, on our centennial coverage of the April 1912 fourth issue of Cartoons Magazine. Basically because there was so much good stuff in it, that I got carried away and scanned nearly all the pages, with the result that April will see a post from me, every day. Including, by the way, two days’ worth of cartoons on the centennial anniversary of the sinking of a certain James Cameron movi–* er-*, I mean, famous ship!

I’ll have to try to restrain myself, next month.

Above, we start with a couple pages devoted to the struggle between having people’s votes actually count in State Primaries, versus the way it was, where the primary vote was just for show, and party bosses could ignore popular will, choosing whom they wanted, instead. We still have a few states with such whacko systems — i.e., meaningless “straw votes” — but it was far worse one hundred years ago, in 1912.

Click on the above picture, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Top left, we’re shown straw Teddy Roosevelt and straw Howard Taft, spearing each other, to zero effect. Amongst the cartoonists addressing this issue — on the right-hand page — are two “W.A.“s — Rogers and Ireland.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Billy Ireland W.A. Ireland

Doug
Doug

Friday, March 30, 2012

William Howard Taft: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, March 1912, Part 9

We round out our extracts from the March 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine, with everybody’s favorite fat President – Howard Taft! His rotundness may have inspired Taft’s depiction as a dirigible in the 2nd cartoon, on the above left-hand page. Next to it, same page, T.R. watches from a distance in the Fontaine Fox cartoon, Perhaps the Big Stick Belongs to the Other Fellow This Time. On the right-hand page, Taft is shown snatching up all the delegates he can — in the form of doughnuts — while Teddy Roosevelt stubbornly sits outside, refusing to join in unless outright handed them, in Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling‘s cartoon, It’ll Soon Be Too Late.

Click on the above picture, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Thursday, March 29, 2012

What Might Have Been

To conclude our coverage (this year) of Women’s History Month, we look above at What Might Have Been, by artist Henry Barkhaus. It was published in the San Francisco humor magazine, The Wasp, on November 15th, 1884 — shortly following the 1884 Presidential Election. The cartoon’s title pokes fun at “What Might Have Happened”, had Presidential candidate Belva Ann Lockwood, of the National Equal Rights Party, been elected. As is typical of cartoons of this theme, it depicts a world where the ascendancy of women, automatically leads to the feminization and subjugation of men. The examples shown follow the typical pattern of what Women’s Suffrage would result in.

Click on the above cartoon, to enlarge it, and view it in greater detail.

Special thanks to Richard West — who authored The San Francisco Wasp, An Illustrated History — for identifying the artist and precise date of this cartoon.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics WaspMag

Doug
Doug

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Fakin’ Notes # 680


 

 

 

Marvel Genesis takes a look at the Hulk’s introduction into his second chance home in Tales to Astonish.

http://www.marvelgenesis.com/2012/03/168-tales-to-astonish-59.html

Here’s a whole big bunch of beautiful full color Sunday strips of all sorts from March of 1959.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2012/03/color-bonanza-tuesday-comic-strip-day.html

One of my favorite 2000AD strips back in the eighties was Strontium Dog with Johnny Alpha.

http://theyellowedpages.blogspot.com/2012/03/strontium-dog-starlord-years-galaxy.html

Daniel Best continues to share court documents from the Siegel case, this one hinging on the iconic Action Comics # 1 cover art.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2012/03/dc-vs-siegel-dcs-appeal-brief-who-did.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Health Care

With the mostly right-wing appointed Supreme Court — complete with at least two Tea Party extremist members — bringing their supposedly “open minds” to the issue of Health Care, it seems like a good time to override what I’d planned to do, and instead run a few classic cartoons on this politicized subject.

So enjoy! Or gnash your teeth (before they fall out for lack of dental care)!

Above & below, scanned from their reprinting in the February 1930 issue of Review of Reviews, are two cartoon illustrations from the magazine Survey Graphic (not “Graphic Survey”, as incorrectly attributed). Above, To Be Sick is Expensive, by Gerta Ries; below, To Be Well is Worth Something, by Florence Bauer.

Next, Hard Times, from the October 24th, 1857 issue of The Picayune, during the Panic of 1857.

Click on the above & below cartoons, to enlarge them, and read their captions.

Above, The Abuse of Wealth Which Creates Communists Among Us, from the centerspread of the September 11th, 1878 issue of Puck magazine, by Puck founder, Joseph Keppler, Sr.

Below, another extract from Review of Reviews (this time, from May 1934): A Rose by Any Other Name, by Tom Carlisle, appearing originally in the New York Herald Tribune. (If you’re thinking it looks like the work of Jay Darling, that because Carlisle was Darling’s assistant.)

Doug Wheeler

NYPuck

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Popeye? Check.

 

Popeye. Need I say more?

 

 

Click the link below to listen.

Check Mr. Popeye – Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Tigwissel Tuesdays, Part 19: Einstein Attempts to Understand Politics

Above, A Knotty Problem for the Wise Men, by Cyrus C. Hungerford. From the pamphlet, Hungerford’s Own Selection of His Best Cartoons for 1934 (published in 1935 by his host newspaper, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette).

Doug Wheeler

Cy Hungerford

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Drippin’ Blood # 679

 

 

 Golden Age comics artist Lee Harris (aka Harris Levey), creator of DC’s Air Wave, is celebrated in a new Wiki page created by his son, Jonathan Levey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harris_Levey

From 1988, here’s a video talk with lefendary Marvel artist and colorist, “Mirthful” Marie Severin.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2012/03/backdate-rewind-marie-severin.html

Finally today, a couple of off-topic plugs: two fun new blogs, one from myself and one from our friend, comics blogger Mykal Banta. Mine is on TV and his on postcards.

http://bookstevechannel.blogspot.com/

http://www.postcardspinnerrack.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, March 26, 2012

General Politics: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, March 1912, Part 8

While the 1912 Presidential Election naturally dominated the first year run of Cartoons Magazine, there was plenty of other political foolishness & scandals happening at that same time. Today’s posting of extracts from its March 1912 third issue, involves these other activities.

Above, several never-had-a-chance aspirants to the Presidency, including William Randolph Hearst (newspaper tycoon, and political loon ala Donald Trump), shown rushing to save Columbia (the U.S.), from the “the villains” (Bryan, Wilson, Taft, T.R.). Also above, is A Reactionary Idol, by pre-Barney Google Billy DeBeck, and, top right, a Joys & Glooms cartoon doubling as an editorial political cartoon, by T.E. Powers.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Immediately below, proof that there’s nothing new about Congressional Investigation Committees out of control. Further down, cartoons on voter fraud (imagined or real), and recalls of recallers.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Ole May

Doug
Doug

Monday, March 26, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Ginger #6

As you know from reading previous installments of Comic Book Compulsive I came to appreciate  Archie Comics relatively late in life.  And while I now find I enjoy the antics of Archie, Betty and Veronica (depending on who’s drawing them of course) I prefer the non-Archie Archie Comics.  Your Wilbur, your Suzie and, in particular, your Ginger.

Branded for no particular reason as the “Sweetheart of a Nation”, she appeared in ten issues of her own comic between 1951 and 1954 and then more or less disappeared.  Which is a shame because besides being a cute as a button redhead (which never hurts) Ginger tended to be more emotionally mature than either Betty & Veronica.  Betty Cooper was undoubtedly the nicest nice girl in American comics, but it’s hard to imagine even her ever going out with Ickky.  Someone who, along with being seriously height challenged looked like Wash Tubbs grandson, was named, well, Ickky.

Here’s a story drawn by the great Harry Lucey.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

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