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Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for the ‘This Day in Arf History’ Category

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Focus on Cartoonists: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, December 1912

Without an election to cover, with December 1912, Cartoons Magazine made several alterations in format. One was that with potent subject matter reduced, there is a reduction in the average number of cartoons per page, including a significant increase in the number of full page cartoons. Another change, is a huge jump in the number of pages that are mostly prose, further reducing the cartoon count in the magazine.

The positive thing for us though, is that all of these new prose pages are devoted to either biographical information about various cartoonists, or, articles written by those cartoonists, themselves.

Above, a hint of Cartoons Magazine‘s subject matter direction to come — the pot of conflicts, still boiling, that will lead to World War I. Cover art by Charles “Doc” Winner.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, the life of newspaper cartooning, by cartoonist Frank Wing.

Above, William K. Patrick, as supposedly written by the mascot that appears in his cartoons.

Below, pages focusing on cartoonists Jack Wilson and Arthur G. Racey.

Above, focus on Paul A. Plaschke. Below, an article on a collection of autographed cartoons.

Beneath, a page of cartoons by Fontaine Fox.

Doug Wheeler

Harry Furniss Homer Davenport E.W. Kemble

Doug
Doug

Friday, November 30, 2012

Cartoons Magazine Centennial’s Post-Election 1912

Finally, finally, we’ve reached the Closing Out, of the Closing Out, of the 1912 Election! (It’s only taken me, like, a hundred years.) As a reprinter of the prior months’ editorial cartoons, Cartoons Magazine‘s November Election follow-up, naturally appeared in its December (mostly) & January (some) issues. In this post, the page is from the December issue, unless I specify it appeared in the January 1913 issue.

Above, After the Votes Were Counted, by artist A.D. Condo (creator of The Outbursts of Everett True), depicting a despondent President William Howard Taft, and a collapsed G.O.P., at their third place finish. (I have no idea what or who “C.P.” stands for.)

Click on the above & below pages, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Cartoons Magazine‘s commentary on how cartoonists covered the election. The December 1912 issue was the first to feature such a long prose piece, and there are several more in this issue, about or by cartoonists (we’ll show those in a later posting). Starting with this issue, prose articles became a regular element in the magazine.

Above, cartoonist Billy Ireland on the “Stand Pat”, no compromise attitude that Republicans took into the 1912 Election (inset cartoon, from pre-Election). And, the result of their taking such positions.

(Does the above in anyway sound familiar??…)

Below, additional election aftermath for the G.O.P., by John Scott Clubb and Ole May.

Above (jokingly), Robert La Follete “To the Rescue”, pictured by Gaar Williams.

Beneath, John DeMar on Woodrow Wilson‘s election (left), and, James H. Donahey, on the Republican Party looking for the return to their fold, of Teddy Roosevelt.

Another type of election loser, above, by Fontaine Fox, Hruska, and Burt Thomas.

Beneath, from the January 1913 issue, Bull Moose/Progressive Party financier George Perkins, shown the door, now that the Party has lost. Cartoons by Robert Carter, Gaar Williams, and Charles “Doc” Winner.

Above, “If we Had an Ex-Presidents Club”, by Donahey, Clubb, and Fox, featuring Taft & T.R.

Below, by William Charles Morris, from the January 1913 issue, university professor Woodrow Wilson, puts on a President’s Hat, while outgoing President Taft, tries on a Professor’s hat.

Above, Teddy Roosevelt’s Son-in-Law, Nicholas Longworth, pictured post-election by artist Oscar Cesare. Longworth had been a sitting Republican Congressman from Ohio, when his more famous father-in-law split the G.O.P. in two. Longworth stuck with the Republicans, which didn’t go down well with T.R.; plus he lost his seat in Congress (but would regain it in the next election).

Beneath (from January 1913, by Charles “Doc” Winner), one term President William Howard Taft, preparing to make his final address to Congress.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics W.A. Ireland

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

R.I.P. Homer Davenport, May 2nd, 1912: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, June 1912, Part 0.2

One hundred years ago today, May 2nd, cartoonist Homer Davenport (born March 8th, 1867) died. Click here to read about him, and the annual festival honoring him, in Silverton, Oregon.

Below, a page of cartoons saluting Davenport, from the June 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Above, a portrait of Davenport and his father, from the dedication page of his 1897 published collection, Cartoons by Davenport.

Click on any picture in this post, to enlarge it and view it in greater detail.

Above, the cover of the 1897-published Cartoons by Davenport. Several cartoons from the collection follow.

Shown above and below, cartoons from the Election of 1896, featuring Republican presidential candidate William McKinley, and Republican National Chairman, Ohio Senator, and Corporate Stooge, Mark Hanna, whom Davenport constantly depicted as wearing a suit checkered with “$” symbols.

Above, No Wonder They Laugh, showing McKinley and Hanna, laughing at the campaign sign “Vote for McKinley and Prosperity“.

Below, McKinley riding the G.O.P. Elephant, and Hanna with a drum strapped to his back (broken from beating it), with the words on the drum reading “Advance Agents of Prosperity“. McKinley remarks (in the caption beneath), “Mark, it don’t look as if the rest of the procession were coming.” In the far background, on the horizon, can be seen closed factories.

Next, Now for Prosperity, depicting Maine Representative Nelson Dingley, Jr., shaking down Uncle Sam, and yielding profits and prosperity for the various monopolies/trusts, grabbing at the falling money below.

Above, the cover from Homer Davenport‘s 1900 cartoon collection The Dollar or the Man?. Hanna figures prominently in this series of cartoons, as do corporate monopolies/trusts, frequently depicted by Davenport as giant, brutish Goliaths. Shown on the cover, is Mark Hanna and the Trusts, engaged in a Tug of War against Uncle Sam and the common people.

Below, a Homer Davenport self-portrait. Davenport continued to draw cartoons in this series, depicting the struggle of the 99% against the abuses of the Corporate Goliaths 1%, until his death.

Above, A full dinner pail for Rockefeller.

Below, The full dinner pail? “Take this to father, dear. It’s light. It won’t be hard to carry. Tell him the new meat schedule of the trust had made it so I couldn’t even get chuck.”

Above & below, Mark Hanna and the Goliath of the Corporate Trusts.

Above, “Mark, do you remember how the poor cuss has worked for us? I wonder if we should cut a check off your coat tail and send it round to his widow?”

Below, “Mark, wouldn’t it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell?”

To find prior postings of this series, click on The Dollar or the Man?

And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Standard Oil Financial Reform Focus on Cartoonists

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

This Day in Arf History-Literally “ARF” History!

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Elzie Crisler Segar was born 115 years ago today. His 1919 comic strip THIMBLE THEATRE had been running for nearly a decade before the belated and unlikely introduction of its leading man, POPEYE. The ugly single-eyed sailor with unnatural strength and a strong set of values was quickly recognized as one of the great strip creations of all time and celebrates his birthday this year with the 4th in Fantagraphics’ top notch series reprinting the character’s complete run under his creator.  Although E. C. Segar died young after only about nine years on his iconic creation, POPEYE outlived him and his fame and popularity are today on or just below a par with MICKEY MOUSE and SHERLOCK HOMES.

Today, according to Wikipedia, Segar himself is aalso getting his due–”In 1977, Segar’s hometown of Chester, Illinois honored its native son with a park named in his honor. The park is home to a six-foot-tall bronze statue of Popeye, and since 1980 has been the site of the annual Popeye Picnic, a weekend-long event that celebrates the character with a parade, film festival and other activities. In 2006, Chester launched the ambitious “Popeye & Friends Character Trail,” which links a series of statues of Segar’s characters located throughout town. Each stands on a base inscribed with the names of donors who contributed to its cost, and is unveiled and dedicated during the Popeye Picnic. The 2006 debut sculpture of hamburger-loving Wimpy stands in Gazebo Park. A statue of Olive Oyl, Swee’Pea and the Jeep, located downtown near the Randolph County Courthouse, followed in 2007. In 2008, a Bluto statue was dedicated at the corner of Swanwick and W. Holmes Streets, in front of Buena Vista Bank. The 2009 statue of Castor Oyl and Bernice the Whiffle Hen stands in front of Chester Memorial Hospital. An additional 11 statues will be unveiled at the rate of one per year until 2019, when a bust of Segar at his birthplace will mark the cartoonist’s 125th birthday.”

So kick back, light up a see-gar and “Arf! Arf!” your way through some POPEYE strips today if you can to remember one of the most important cartoonists of the 20th Century!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, November 2, 2009

Happy Birthday Steve Ditko

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ditkobbaa

On this day in comics history in 1927, artist Steve Ditko was born. Craig has said of Ditko, “The master, Steve Ditko, his name thrills me as his concepts and art certainly do.” Although he has shunned interviews and public appearances for more than four decades, Ditko is not a recluse and is well known for being nice to industry professionals and fans alike–even fans like the UK’s Jonathan Ross who, with Neil Gaiman in tow, essentially invaded his offices (off camera) as part of a BBC documentary entitled IN SEARCH OF STEVE DITKO a couple years back.

Probably the most principled man in comics history, Steve Ditko has long been and remains at age 82 a controversial figure for his unbridled embracing of Randian philosophy, his seemingly odd choices in his comics work (years of working for low-paying Charlton when the bigger publishers would have made him rich, leaving SPIDER-MAN and refusing to ever draw the character again, etc.), his eccentric self-published titles, his lack of visibility and seeming lack of caring in most cases and the very fact that only a handful of photographs of him have ever surfaced, the most recent I believe, being 50 years old now!

Freely credited by Stan Lee (as well as director Sam Raimi in the credits of all three films) as the co-creator of SPIDER-MAN, it was Ditko’s characters, concepts and inimitable sense of costume design that made the strip initially popular. He also created DOCTOR STRANGE, CAPTAIN ATOM and went on to create the 1960′s revamp of THE BLUE BEETLE, the iconic QUESTION, THE CREEPER and his own black and white (and black OR white!) character, MR. A.

Along with his no interviews policy, Ditko has long shunned any personal profiles but in 2008, author Blake Bell published a nice coffee table volume entitled STRANGER AND STRANGER: THE WORLD OF STEVE DITKO. Although it contained more biographical info than fans had yet seen, Ditko has always said that he would prefer his work to speak for itself.  Toward that end of the spectrum comes Craig’s upcoming book, THE ART OF STEVE DITKO (see http://theartofditko.com/).

One of the most recognizable stylists in the history of comic books, Steve Ditko’s art and writing can be a polarizing force but one can’t deny its importance. Seen here is an ultra-rare fan commissioned drawing  (part of a much larger, multi-artist piece) of THE BLUE BEETLE done in either the late 1970′s or the early 1980′s and marking one of the ONLY known times Steve Ditko ever revisited one of his classic characters.

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Sunday, October 11, 2009

This Day in Arf History

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simon

On this date in history, the very much still with us JOE SIMON was born. Simon ranks near the top of the most influential figures in comics history for his creation of CAPTAIN AMERICA with Jack Kirby, his tenure as editor at early Timely Comics and Simon & Kirby’s long partnership that created and/or popularized kid gangs and romance comics.  He also had a long tenure packaging books for Harvey and a long run at MAD imitator SICK. He was even involved (depending on your definition) in the convoluted history of the character that eventually became SPIDER-MAN. Author of a fascinating illustrated memoir, THE COMIC BOOK MAKERS, Simon turns 94 today!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, October 8, 2009

This Day in Arf History

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Actor Kirk Alyn was born on this day in 1910. Although little remembered today Alyn was the big screen’s very first SUPERMAN in two 1940′s serials. He appeared in a number of B westerns, cop films and serials besides, connecting to the comics field yet again as the star of BLACKHAWK. A popular Comic Book Convention guest in later years, Alyn’s cameo in the 1978 Christopher Reeve version of SUPERMAN was cut at the time of its original release but was restored on ABC in the early eighties and appears in the box set version released a few years ago. For years he sold his fun autobiography, A JOB FOR SUPERMAN, at shows and by mail order. Kirk Alyn died in 1999.

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, October 5, 2009

On This day In History

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Groovy 001-004-005

Two controversial cartoonists who’ve left their mark on the industry were born on this date–the late Bob Thaves was born in 1924 and Bil Keane was born in 1922. In both cases the reason they’re controversial stems from the alleged bland repetitiveness of their work.

Thaves started out doing magazine cartoons including the one seen here from GROOVY, a 1960′s gag mag published–in a way–by Marvel. He went on to be amazingly successful for a long time with his simple joke-a-day vaudeville panel strip, FRANK AND ERNEST. Thaves is credited with the classic line regarding dancer Fred Astaire–”Sure he was great, but don’t forget that
Ginger Rogers did everything he did, backwards…and in high heels.”?
 
In 1960 Bil Keane created THE FAMILY CIRCUS based on his own family. The fact that it appears in a round panel instead of a traditional square one has lead many to refer to it incorrectly as THE FAMILY CIRCLE. It’s a sweet strip with sweet kids and old-fashioned fifties sitcom moments and yet again, it’s been popular enough to win its creator a number of awards over the years including the coveted Reuben! Keane’s assistant in recent years has been his son Jeff, long-grown from the forever little Jeffy in the panel.
Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, February 29, 2008

This Day in Arf History: Paolo Eleuteri Serpieri was Born

On this day in 1944 Italian comic artist and illustrator Paolo Eleuteri Serpieri was born. His work on the erotic Druuna series was featured in Heavy Metal Magazine.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Thursday, February 28, 2008

This Day in Arf History: Milton Caniff was Born!

On this day in 1907 Milton Caniff was born. Caniff is best known, of course, for Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon (featured a while back in Friday’s the Flying Flick). Caniff was an Eagle Scout and received an Eagle Scout award from the Boy Scouts of America. Maybe the Boy Scouts didn’t know about Milt’s drawings that are in my new book “Clean Cartoonists’ Dirty Drawings”.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

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