Super I.T.C.H » 2011 » November
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for November, 2011

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Headline Comics #14

I realize that I just posted about an issue of Headline Comics and that for the sake of novelty I should wait a while before posting this one, but screw that.  This one is too good to sit on.

Before Atomic Man came on the scene the headliners of Headline Comics were the Junior Rangers, a fairly anemic kid gang of the ordinary-kids-fight-the-Nazi’s subcategory.  There was All-American boy Roger, tough talking Smokey, farm boy Alergnon and Chinese-American Chan.  The only vaguely interesting thing about the Junior Rangers was, you guessed it, Chan, a rare non-stereotypical Asian who in spite of his stiff English and traditional Chinese dress was just one of the guys.

As previously established you really can’t put your trust in a Golden Age comic book cover.  More often than not they either featured symbolic covers which were iconic and/or ironic or depicted scenes that appeared nowhere in its contents.  But as you’ll soon see for yourself, this issue really does feature an advanced civilization created by seven-foot tall penguins.

 

Every once in a while something absolutely original would appear in the back of a Golden Age comic, a feature that went way beyond the usual assortment of magicians, explorers and two-fisted adventurers you’d normally get.  I’d say something like Worldbeater and Unggh by August Froehlich, but there is nothing like it.

And finally there’s Blue Streak, a supposedly powerless trapeze artist who fought crime on the side.  I saw “supposedly” because while he spends a good percentage of this story swinging from a rope most of the time it doesn’t seem to be actually attached to anything.  If that’s not a super power I don’t know what one is.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

The Monopoly Missionaries & the Wicked Island: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 70

WARNING: The below 19th century cartoon contains racist imagery.

The above cartoon, depicting stock market manipulators/”Monopoly Missionaries” Cyrus Field (holding oar), Jay Gould (mid-boat), and William H. Vanderbilt (bow), weeping at how their good works are unappreciated by the Masses — who are shown as (the 19th century racist depiction of) “inferior savages”. This illustration caught my eye, as similar to how Wall Street/Republicans/the Conservative Press currently view the Occupy Wall Street movement. The Good Monopoly Missionaries and the Wicked Island, by Frederick Burr Opper, appeared on the front cover of the February 28th, 1883 issue of Puck magazine.

Click on the above cartoon, to both enlarge it, and view the entire Puck front cover.

Below, is Puck‘s editorial prose, commenting on the subject of Opper’s cartoon.

To find prior episodes of this series,click on Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons. And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYPuck

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Losin’ Sleeps # 525

 

 

Gus Arriola’s always delightful, stylish and stylized Sunday Gordo strips are out in force at The Fabuleous Fifties today.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2011/11/amazing-gordo-tuesday-comic-strip-day.html

Artist Jack Sparling delineates the cast of Checkmate, one of my favorite early sixties television programs, in the first issue of its comic book adaptation.

http://comicreadinglibrary.blogspot.com/2011/11/checkmate-1.html

 

You’ve heard of ‘em and here they are–the legendarily subversive Mars Attacks trading cards–designed by Wally Wood and Bob Powell and painted by Norm Saunders.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2011/11/mars-attacks-cards-topps-1962-art-by.html

Finally today, Pappy’s got a Felix which gives us a chance to plug Yoe Books’ Felix the Cat–The Great Comic Book Tails, now on sale in hardback and coming soon in paperback!

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2011/11/number-1062-felix-steps-out-felix-steps.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Ringin’ Bells # 524

 

 

If you’re late to the party like I was, you have more than a couple hundred posts to enjoy when you finally visit the fun site, Marvel Comics of the 1980′s (or is it Welcome to the Marvel 1980′s?)

http://marvel1980s.blogspot.com/

From, of all places, The Cheyenne Kid, here’s a chapter of the Charlton cult sci-fi cowboys and aliens feature, Wander, by a pseudonymous Denny O’Neil with Jim Aparo.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2011/11/bring-on-back-ups-week-amazed-by-aparo.html?

Here’s a lovely and nostalgic adventure of Marvel’s Doctor Strange from Marvel Fanfare by Walt Simonson with art by the great Dave Gibbons.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2011/11/dr-strange-by-walt-simonson-and-dave.html

Finally today, from the pop culture one-stop that is Forces of Geek, here’s another nifty holiday gift guide that includes, amongst many other great suggestions, some of our favorite Yoe Books.

http://www.forcesofgeek.com/2011/11/2011-forces-of-geek-holiday-gift-guide.html

 

 

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, November 28, 2011

Booksteve Recommends! Titles and Stuff I Worked On in 2011 That Would Make Great Gifts!

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AT BOOKSTEVE’S LIBRARY–REPRINTED HERE BY PERMISSION OF ME

In lieu of a regular job this past year, I have been keeping busy by doing work behind the scenes on various books, most of which would make wonderful holiday gifts for the discerning comics or pop culture fan! Let’s go over the list!

I’ve written here before that most of my work was for Yoe Books so let’s go there first, shall we?  Just remember…that man with the white beard isn’t Santa. He’s a former muppet.

My favorite would have to be ARCHIE: A CELEBRATION OF AMERICA’S FAVORITE TEENAGERS. This 70th anniversary history/tribute of is the one I worked on most, doing interviews, providing art, proofreading, transcription and even ghostwriting first drafts of many chapters in the book. Visually, Craig has designed an absolutely stunning look back at the company’s output covering not just the comics but radio, cartoons, music, television and merchandising! The book has been criticized by some as whitewashing the history part but look at the title. This was meant to be a “celebration!” And a joyous one it is! If you’ve ever enjoyed Archie in any decade, you’ll love meeting your old friends all over again in this lovely volume!

THE BEST OF ARCHIE’S MADHOUSE was the nifty follow-up to the above, reprinting scores of silly and fun pieces from Archie Comics’ own in-house version of MAD that ran through the 1960′s. I wrote a second draft of the introduction to this one as well as did research, proofreading and fact-checking. In the process, I got to do a second interview with writer George Gladir, a dear man who was long associated with the title and who co-created SABRINA, THE TEENAGE WITCH with artist Dan DeCarlo! Sabrina’s early stories appeared in ARCHIE’S MADHOUSE and her debut is reprinted here along with a rare Wally Wood story–his only one for the company.

AMAZING 3-D COMICS, as I mentioned in my review, was fun for me in spite of the fact that I can’t see 3-D! Never could! that right there should say something. As always from Yoe, it’s a beautifully designed volume with a multi-layered lenticular cover by Joe Kubert done exclusively for this book! The history of 3-D is presented in–pardon the pun–great depth and then a wide selection of reprints from the various publishers who jumped on that bandwagon during the fifties boom fills out the book…in 3-D…with glasses! For this book, I provided some illustrations, proofread, transcribed interviews and was greatly pleased at being able to speak at some length with Joan Howard Maurer whose husband Norman was one of the co-craetors of comic book 3-D. Ms. Maurer herself is the delightful daughter of Stooge Moe Howard, a  lifelong favorite of mine.

BOB POWELL’S TERROR is the newest book from Yoe Books. I did research, fact-checking and proofreading for this one. I’m working on a bigger piece on it but for now let’s just say if you’re a fan of pre-Code horror comics, this collection offers some of the best outside of EC. Mostly unsung artist Bob Powell worked on all genres from the forties to the sixties and was always creative but horror was probably his best. Craig has chosen many grisly but stylish examples, some from the original art!

THE CARL BARKS BIG BOOK OF BARNEY BEAR surprised me as the stories, while not on par with the artist’s Disney Duck stories, were much more fun than the MGM cartoon source material would lead one to expect! On this one I did proofreading only but my wife came up with the final version of the title after several early ones were rejected.

POPEYE: THE GREAT COMIC BOOK TALES BY BUD SAGENDORF offers just that–a whole big bunch of fun tales of the legendary one-eyed sailor man by the artist most associated with him other than creator Elzie Segar. As usual, there’s a wonderfully detailed background history up front. I proofread this one, too.

Not out but due before Christmas from Cider Mill Press is Craig’s OFFICIAL BARF BOOK, the follow-up to his shockingly successful OFFICIAL FART BOOK from last year! I did quite a bit of writing (yuck!) for this one and my wife and I both did extensive (and somewhat disgusting!) research for it.

And for the younger folks on your holiday lists, don’t forget Craig’s GREAT TREASURY OF CHRISTMAS COMIC BOOK STORIES from last year! I didn’t work on it one bit but it’s a wonderful nostalgic treat for adults that should be shared with children of all ages!

One more from Craig, this one published by Abrams, is KRAZY KAT AND THE ART OF GEORGE HERRIMAN. While I did some research for this one early on, it ended up not being used so technically I didn’t work on it. Honestly, I’ve never even been a fan of KRAZY KAT. That said, this may well be Craig Yoe’s best book to date and my favorite of his works! It’s a big, beautiful, passionate love letter to one of his personal favorites. I’m overdue on a full review so watch for it!

Okay, moving on from Yoe. I was pleased to do proofreading and fact-checking on Greg Theakston’s somewhat eccentric and controversial two-volume biography of Jack Kirby, JACK MAGIC. Greg even lists me as co-editor on Volume 2. The author has spent much of his career as a publisher chronicling the King’s life and works and these volumes, based in part on his own many interactions with and observations of the man over several decades, gave me a whole new perspective on Kirby’s place in comics history…and Stan Lee’s also! Volume One seems to be already hard to find but you can order Volume Two here.

Author Martin Grams is the prolific purveyor of pop culture histories of radio and television shows whose books this past year included SCIENCE-FICTION THEATRE and THE SHADOW, both of which I proofread. The former tells the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of a now obscure but pioneering sci-fi TV series that’s more interesting than many of the low-budget episodes themselves. The latter is one of the absolute best books of its type, giving a minutely detailed history of the long-running and legendary SHADOW radio show and contrasting it with the related but very, very different pulp series of the same name. If you go here to order copies, BOOKSTEVE’S LIBRARY gets a small cut to help keep us on the Net!

Speaking of Martin, BOOKSTEVE RARITIES is the site we run together in which Martin’s extensive collections of rare and otherwise unavailable movies and TV shows are offered at low, low prices on DVD and again the BOOKSTEVE blogs earn a percentage of all orders. If you’re a B Western fan in particular, THIS should be your one-stop! Updated monthly with new and amazing obscurities, we strive to offer the best deals, the best quality product and the best service!

When it comes to BOOKSTEVE’S BOOKSTORE PLUS!, the products form there come directly from BOOKSTEVE’S LIBRARY and are all one of a kind, unique collectibles for the right person on your list. Take a look around here for the ever-changing, updated daily bargain pop culture treats!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, November 28, 2011

Playing Indian, 1873

To close out our coverage of Native American History Month (until next year), we present Playing Indian, from the rear cover of the September 27th, 1873 issue of Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly. Showing the misadventures of two young boys, who have been too much influenced by the dime store novels of the day.

Click on the above picture, to make it larger and more readable.

To view prior Native American History postings, click here.

Doug Wheeler

NativeAmericanHistory FLBGWeekly

Doug
Doug

Monday, November 28, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Valiant Annual 1972

By the early 1970’s the heyday of British comics were pretty much over, if you ask me anyway.  So you can imagine my surprise when I undiscovered that lurking beneath the slightly disturbing cover featuring Captain Hurricane Valiant Annual ’72 contained (a) two three pages Billy Bunter stories, (b) a rousing installment of Kelly’s Eye (colored a bright yellow lemon for no discernible reason) and finally (c) a full color adventure of The Ghostly Guardian.

 

\

 

 

There was any number of British strips about tear away youths who took up lodging in mysterious old castles only to invariably discover it was their ancestral home.  And naturally somewhere in its shadows was some sort of magical or ghostly ancestor who would try to drive them off but would invariably become their pal/mentor/protector.  The Ghostly Guardian was one of them, a jolly variation on the theme that managed to make the relationship between the abused boy and the lively ghost seem wonderfully endearing.  Full color was a rare thing in British Annuals even during their heyday so to find it in this story makes this Annual an extra special treat.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Friday, November 25, 2011

Who Should vs. Who Does Pay the Taxes: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 69

This week, as everyone should have expected from the start, the Congressional “Super Legion”… uh, “Injustice League”… er… “Committee“(??), came to zero agreement.

Click on any of the pictures above and below, to view enlarged versions.

Above, The End of a Bad Show, depicting the workings of the “Grand National Congressional Theatre”. Puck magazine’s mascot can be seen making his exit, bottom right. The above cartoon by Puck magazine’s founder, Joseph Keppler, Sr., appeared as the centerspread in the February 28th, 1883 issue of Puck.

Starting with Ronald Reagan, Republicans have followed a strategy of lowering taxes for the wealthy, spending wrecklessly and irresponsibly when they hold the Presidency, and borrowing heavily to make up the difference. Then, when Democrats take over the Presidency, they have to spend their time cleaning up the messes created by Republicans, who renounce their profligate spending (until, that is, the next time they regain power), and place blame for what they created, on whatever Democrat is now in charge.

Having destroyed our economy, and given us a Second Great Depression (just as they gave us the First Great Depression), Republicans, controlled by Tea Party (the Libertarian Party under a new name) extremists, insist that the past three decades of tax breaks for the rich, be paid for by taking away safety net programs for everyone else, now, when they are most needed.

Above, the title page headpiece art from the February 1894 issue of Judge’s Library, whose theme that issue was The Almighty Dollar.

The Tea Party’s refrain is that government doesn’t work. And they’ve proven this, by being the ones who stop it from working. It was the Republicans/Tea Party, who turned the deficit (they created) into a “crisis”, by holding the country hostage to their demands — threatening that unless they got their way, they would force the U.S. into default on its loans (which they took out). The U.S. dropped in credit rating, and our interest rate climbed, as a direct result of the obstinance of the Tea Party.

Above, left, the Bank of England climbing higher up a ladder representing the interest rate at which they lent money to America. She is climbing higher, due to financial troubles in the U.S. From the November 7th, 1857 issue of Picayune, a New York City comic weekly.

Above right, Opened with Prayer, depicting Congress in action just prior to the Civil War. From the December 31st, 1859 debut issue of Vanity Fair. Click on that picture not only to enlarge it, but to also read the satirical prose piece that accompanied it. Illustration by Vanity Fair‘s founder/editor, Henry Louis Stephens.

The Tea Party/Republicans are demanding a (further) transfer of wealth from the middle class and poor, to the most wealthy, claiming that the wealthy are the “job creators”. Look around. What jobs have they created lately? They have been creating jobs, just not in the U.S. Tax breaks given to the richest 1%, do not result in jobs in the U.S. — as the wealthy instead use the money from their tax breaks to invest overseas, including helping to pay the expenses of transferring still more factories & jobs to Asia and South/Central America.

The true job creators are the middle class and poor, whose spending here, in the U.S., is what drives job creation. By acting as Reverse-Robin Hoods, taking money out of the pockets of those whose spending is what truly creates jobs, Republican Party policies increase unemployment.

Above, by cartoonist Nelson Harding, from the 1912-published booklet The Political Campaign of 1912 in Cartoons by Nelson Harding (Eagle Library No. 170), is Standing Pat. Apparently, one hundred years ago, just as today, Republicans were seen as behaving like extortionists. This cartoon originally appeared in the newspaper The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, during the 1912 Presidential Election.

Below, monopolists Andrew Carnegie, J.D. Rockefeller, and Henry Osborne Havemeyer (a leading Sugar Trust robber baron), point at a poor working farmer and his son, in answer to “Who Should — Who Does — Pay the Taxes?”, plate 45 from the collection of Homer Davenport cartoons, The Dollar or the Man?, published in 1900.

We’ll be seeing much more from both The Dollar or the Man?, and, The Political Campaign of 1912 in Cartoons, as well as extracts from numerous other political booklets and pamphlets (from both side), throughout the 2012 Election year.

To find prior episodes of this series,click on Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons. And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYPuck NYPicayune JudgeMag KepplerSR HLStephens CongressCartoons

Doug
Doug

Thursday, November 24, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Headline Comics #18

The Prize Comics Group, a.k.a. Crestwood Publications, a.k.a. Feature Publications was another Golden Age comic book publisher who only published a handful of titles and only two of note.  One, Prize Comics, best known for Dick Briefer’s Frankenstein but also home to Powers Nelson, Futureman (on the short list of super-heroes who inserted their Christian name into his superhero one), The Black Owl, Yank and Doodle and Dr. Frost.  And Headline Comics, which is probably best known for being turned into a crime title by Simon & Kirby late in its run.

Before that it was Headline Comics (For The American Boy), a pretty generic , mediocre Golden Age comic with a kid-centric focus.  For most of this version of the comic the headliners were a kid gang called the Junior Rangers, the only interesting thing about them being the fact they had a Chinese-American member.  But in #16 Headline Comics got an early jump on the atomic powered superhero derby by cover featuring Atomic Man.  Secretly Adam Mann who’s atomic experiments gave him the usual compliment of super powers; besides the nicely old fashioned art by the unknown artist the most interesting thing about him was the fact he (somehow) could neutralize his powers by putting on a lead glove.  That and he seems to have tucked his cape into his underwear.

And finally, I’ve included this adventure of Copy Boy, mostly because he is another prime example of the sadly forgotten post-war male pompadour.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Hail Columbia! 1876

WARNING: The below 19th century cartoons contain racist imagery and slurs.

Today, for Thanksgiving and Native American History Month, we return to the illustrated comical histories (from the viewpoint of the invading culture) of Walter F. Brown. The pages above and below were extracted from his book, Hail Columbia!, published in the U.S. Centennial year of 1876, by The Graphic Company (publisher of the New York Daily Graphic).

Click on the pictures above and below, to view larger versions.

To view prior Native American History postings, click here.

Doug Wheeler

NativeAmericanHistory Pocahontas Columbus Pilgrims

Doug
Doug

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