Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » October
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for October, 2010

Sunday, October 31, 2010

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Swing With Scooter

You really can’t lump Swing With Scooter in with DC’s other teen comics.   A hodgepodge of everything that was going on in the zeitgeist at the time concocted by Barbara Friedlander (a regular contributor to the DC’s romances titles completely unknown to comic book guys such as myself) and Jack Miller and drawn by Joe Orlando.  It ran 36 issues between 1966 and 1971.

And as you can from his supporting cast there wasn’t anything overtly ‘Archie’ about him:

Even designated fat guy Sylvester (“The One and Only Tubby Greenbacks”) wasn’t the stereotypical eating machine; first and foremost he was a stereotypical tightwad of Jack Benny proportions who actively loved money so much he couldn’t bear to part with it. Plus, as you can from the one page strip below, he was brimming with unwarranted self esteem not usually found in comic book fat guys.

But the breakout star amongst the supporting cast was Malibu, a guy who appeared to be a cross between Eddie Munster from The Munsters and Ilya Kurakin from The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Dubbed “the rage from Finksville” for no apparent reason (perhaps the author was under the impression it sounded like “teen hip talk”) he constantly wore a white trench coat and occasionally said something that suggested he was a vampire  – in spite of the fact he could move about freely during the day.

As I compulsively like to say “weird almost always gets you half way to good” so, I place into evidence this story from Swing From Scooter #4.

None of the stories in Swing With Scooter were what I would call good exactly, but they were really, really weird.  And they were certainly a whole lot better than the weak tea Archie clone it later became under the hands of Doug Crane and Henry Scarpelli.   Scooter lost his scooter, Sylvester became an eating machine and it turned out that instead of “just” being a 60′s style teen vampire super secret agent Malibu it turned out that he really was from a place called “Finksville” that was inhabited entirely by movie monsters.  I’d post one of those stories so you can compare and contrast the two different versions for yourself but…trust me, this cover is more than enough.

As I’ve written we’ll probably never see a revival of either Buzzy or Binky but there’s definitely enough potential in Scooter for a new version.  I keep saying how DC should revamp some of their characters so they reflect the same age as their graying readership.  Today Scooter would be well into his 70′s so, how about the adventures of him and his pals as they segue their way into a assisted living community by running around on their electric Rascals.  The title:  Power Mobility Scooter.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Sunday, October 31, 2010

The Dollar or the Man # 4: Mark, Wouldn’t it be Great for the Standard Oil Dinner Bell !

Homer Davenport

In 1900, New York Journal political cartoonist Homer Davenport published a collection of his work titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day. The cartoons focused on themes of government corruption and the threat that corporate power posed to America. These themes are with us today and will influence many of the votes cast in next week’s mid-term elections.

Davenport’s cartoons mark the beginning of the Progressive Era, a time when many believed that corporations sought to overthrow the government.

Mark, wouldn't it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell ! by Homer Davenport

Mark, wouldn’t it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell ! by Homer Davenport
Plate XI from The Dollar or the Man, the Issue of To Day, 1900
Originally published in the New York Journal newspaper
7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

In this cartoon, a Trust figure and Republican politcal operative Mark Hanna stand next to the Liberty Bell, a symbol of American Independence.

During the Revolutionary War the bell was used in Philadelphia to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to notify citizens of meetings, proclamations or civic dangers. In the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist groups who gave it the name "Liberty Bell."

Oddly, the legend of the Liberty Bell relies more on fiction than fact. In 1847 a popular short story described an event in which the bell was rung to celebrate the Second Continental Congress’ vote for independence on July 4, 1776. While historical events do not support the story (bells were rung on July 8th to announce the reading of the Declaration of Independence), it was widely accepted as fact.

In 1885, the city of Philadelphia allowed the bell to tour the United States. It attracted large crowds, but the rigors of its journies caused additional cracking and viewers would sometimes chip away pieces of the bell as souvenirs. It’s last tour ended in 1915

Detail of Mark, wouldn't it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell ! by Homer Davenport

Detail of
Mark, wouldn’t it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell ! by Homer Davenport

The Trust figure wistfully muses about appropriating the bell – and all it represents – for the purposes of the Standard Oil Company.

Click here for the previous post in this series  |  Click here to read the next post in this series

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Sunday, October 31, 2010

More Cartoons the Tea Party Would Like to Bring Back

The basic theme today, is to run a few cartoons involving ills of the past, which were cured by government programs or agencies, which various Tea Party candidates have stated they would like to eliminate. It being Halloween, it also helps if Death just happens to be hanging around in the cartoon. (Exception, I did have lined up a couple of gruesome Daily Graphic Cholera cartoons by Bellew, from epidemics in NYC in the 1870s, but, given the situation in Haiti, I don’t use those to take political jabs — maybe I’ll show them later, in reference to Haiti.) Of course, there are some things Republicans & Tea Party candidates state they wish to do, that have no 19th century equivalent to harken back to — no cartoons showing, say, a Republican politician of the future, chest-deep in ocean water, hanging for life to a pole with a sign on top reading “Florida Real Estate for Quick Sale!” — saying “We need to move forward. My opponent only wants to talk about the past!”, while, say, some ragged refugees on a raft point angrily at him, the cartoon being labelled, ”Try for Genocide against the Human Race, Politicians who sold out future generations for their personal gain!”. Nor, are there any 19th century cartoons, dealing with a political party being determined to stop all legislation, and bring the entire givernment to a halt by refusing to provide the funds to pay for anything, as quite a number of Tea Party/Republican candidates are now stating they intend to do (oops, sorry troops in Afghanistan and Iraq — you can find your own way home, can’t you? Or maybe you’d be better off, just staying there and blending in!).

The American people usually elect to congress candidates, of both parties, with the expectation that they will endeavor to work together, to find common ground. The Republican & Tea Party candidates running today, have explicitly stated they have zero intention to co-operate with the President and Democratic House & Senate member, having purged from their ranks those moderates who dared to try to get things done by seeking agreement with the other side. The majority of Americans are not paying attention to what Republican candidates have been saying — that they have no intention to govern, their intention is to halt government.     

Anyway, let’s get to the examples. One of the government agencies supposedly “stealing freedom”, is apparently the Food & Drug Administration. Their requirement that milk be pasteurized, has made America a dictatorship. So, soon after the Tea Party gets their way, and eliminates the F.D.A., as several candidates  have stated they wish to do — and we start importing without inspection, baby formula from China, or, start getting the taste of freedom from our own farms – we’ll be able to again appreciate what the two below cartoons from the days of true liberty, were trying to tell us…  

Left, the 1911 cartoon Where Grim Death Daily Lurks, by J. Campbell Cory, from his 1920 published collection, The Cartoonist’s Art. Right, Impure Milk is the Best Crepe Maker — artist not identified, from the Toronto publication La Paye, taken here from the September 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on any picture, to open a larger version.

Below left, Republicans and their Libertarian-Tea Party extremists, are certain that the best way to get America working again, is to remove all regulations from industry — including those pesky Child Labor laws, which prevent the U.S. from competing on a level playing field, with all those countries where children are expected to be in factories, and not in school! Of course, as demonstrated by Hal Coffman, in this 1912 cartoon printed in the New York American newspaper (taken from its reprinting in the October 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine), titled “No, Got All the Help I Need”, specifically who Republicans and the Tea Party intend to get back-to-work, might not be who most Americans were thinking of…  

And, now that the kids are working, and bringing in a fraction of what Mom and/or Dad used to be bringing in, America just might have some trouble paying the doctor bills (remember, they plan to trash that nasty Health Care that’s stealing your freedom by taking care of you!). But don’t fear, a few Tea Party candidates have the solution! You can pay your doctor in chickens! Yes — the barter system still works — the Tea Party says so! (Now, to figure out what the average non-farmer American will need to trade for those chickens! Plus, what they’ll need to trade, to get a truckload of chickens transported to the hospital, to pay for major surgery! Plus just where on the internet one looks, for the doctors in the health care=farm animals network, who are set up to accept such payments!) Below right, Hard Times, from December 1857 issue of Nick-Nax.

Next, quite a number of Tea Party and Republicans candidates, have made statements along the lines that “There is no such thing as the Separation of Church and State in the Constitution”, and, that “Individual States are free to establish their own State religion”, and even, that the Constitution should be altered to reflect the Bible. So, another category cartoons that the Tea Party wishes to bring back, would be those such as the below pair of cartoons from the 1835 issue of Scraps #6, by David Claypoole Johnston, depicting protestant violence against catholics, then occuring in Massachusetts.  

And finally, we want to get back to Death to end this Halloween posting, so, having covered the “food” side of the Food & Drug Adminstration — let’s get to the fun “drug” side. That pesky F.D.A. has kept Americans from tasting true freedom in the original formulation of Coca-Cola for the past century (its name comes from the fact that it originally contained Cocaine). And, back in the days when manufacturers were free to stick drugs into our food (I can’t wait for some unregulated genetically-altering substances! ),  the drug manufacturers were free to stick in all manner of toxic non-drug substances, into our medicine! Hurray! The below 1912 Life magazine Harrison Cady cartoon — Advertising Pays —  shows Death painting a billboard for Old Dr. Killems Dopine.

Happy Halloween!

To find previously posted Election-related cartoons, click here.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionCartoons NYLife NickNax John Campbell Cory

Doug
Doug

Saturday, October 30, 2010

The Dollar or the Man # 3: Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They’re your only true friends …

In 1900, New York Journal political cartoonist Homer Davenport published a collection of his work titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day. The cartoons focused on themes of government corruption and the threat that corporate power posed to America. These themes are with us today and will influence many of the votes cast in next week’s mid-term elections.

Homer Davenport

Davenport’s cartoons mark the beginning of the Progressive Era, a time when many believed that corporations sought to overthrow the government.

Mark, wouldn't it be great for the Standard Oil dinner bell ! by Homer Davenport

Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They’re your only true friends.
Don’t you see how happy they’ve made you?
by Homer Davenport
Plate XLIII from The Dollar or the Man, the Issue of To Day, 1900
Originally published in the New York Journal newspaper
7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

In the cartoon above, Davenport shows Republican operative Mark Hanna as the protector of the trusts. He pontificates on their altruistic benevolence as one of the trusts crouches in hiding, club in hand..

Detail of Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They're your only true friends. Don't you see how happy they've made you? by Homer Davenport

Detail of
Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They’re your only true friends.
Don’t you see how happy they’ve made you?
by Homer Davenport

The screen is decorated with a cornucopia, a traditional symbol of prosperity, but in place of the customary fruit, flowers and grain, coins spill out. In folklore, the cornucopia was filled with whatever the owner desired. In this cartoon, it is placed on a device of concealment shared by Hanna and the Trust.

Detail of Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They're your only true friends. Don't you see how happy they've made you? by Homer Davenport

Detail of
Ladies and gentlemen: Stick to the trusts. They’re your only true friends.
Don’t you see how happy they’ve made you?
by Homer Davenport

The overweight Hanna addresses an emaciated crowd with threadbare clothes as a vision of death hovers above them.

Click here for the previous post in this series  |  Click here to read the next post in this series

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Buying Congress

Thanks to “Citizens United”, a secretly funded group whose petition before our conservative activist Supreme Court, resulted a century’s worth of election reforms being thrown away, corporations have free reign to anonymously use all the money they wish to, to influence elections. Corporations do not spend money unless they believe it will profit them. They are “investing” — in Tea Party/Republican candidates — whom these companies believe will enact (or stop) legislation to the direct benefit of themselves. When you see corporations spending money to support a particular candidate, or party, you know it’s because that person or party will be taking the side of those who are investing in his or her election…

Still worse, information has surfaced this past week, that the Libertarian oil billionaire Koch brothers — who were the primary funders behind the creation of the Tea Party — have been regularly convening conferences of corporate heads, on how to halt and eliminate government regulation of corporate activities (such as pollution, liability for damages, election contributions, etc), and, that the attendees of these conferences have included Supreme Court justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas, both of whom then ruled in favor of Citizens United, and the elimination of election reforms meant to keep corporations from controlling the U.S. government! (Click here for more information.) 

Corporate buying of elections and control/ownership of legislators, has a long history. Democrats have been so influenced, just as Republicans, but, the party of choice for finding politicians willing to do what corporations and monopolies want, has been the Republicans going back to at least the time of President Grant.

First, a couple of non-partisan (a pox on both your houses) examples. Below left, Grundy’s Map of the Senate?, by Daniel Fitzpatrick, published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and reprinted soon after in the May 1930 issue of American Review of Reviews, depicting senators organized not by state, but by the industries which have bought them out. Below right, The High Cost of Politics, by Luther Bradley in the Chicago Daily News, from its reprinting in the November 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Click on any picture, to open an enlarged version.

Below left, a 1912 cartoon by J. Campbell Cory, titled Not a Bad Idea!, from Cory’s 1920 book, The Cartoonist’s Art, depicting Republican Senator Nelson Aldrich, handing the U.S. to the monopolies, on a silver platter. 

Below right, (unsuccessful) candidate for Democratic nominee for President, Champ Clark — and who he really was under the mask, titled Making Up, by Barnett in the Los Angeles Tribune, published in the  June 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine.

Below left from 1910, another cartoon by Cory. Showing the Trusts (i.e., monopolies), stating “I Can’t Understand Why the People Don’t Like Me — I’ve always Been a Good Republican.” 

Below right, by Will E. Chapin, No Wonder They Want the Press Muzzled (in reference to the California legislature’s attempts to regulate political caricatures), from Chapin’s 1899 collection titled simply, Cartoons.

Like Jay Gould, monopolist William Vanderbilt supported/bought Republican legislators. The below left June 6th, 1881 New York Daily Graphic page, by artist Charles Jay Taylor — depicting Vanderbilt using his wealth to influence an election – was the third of approximately a dozen Taylor comic strips starring Vanderbilt. It was shown on SuperITCH this past summer — click on the picture, to see that article. 

Below right, Frederick Burr Opper’s depiction of Vanderbilt making his most infamous quote — The Public Be Damned!  Appearing on the front cover of the October 18th, 1882 issue of Puck magazine, it depicts Vanderbilt with his foot atop the American eagle, as his two chained lapdogs, named Congress and Legislature, sit obediently at Vanderbilt’s side. This cartoon, too, has been previously shown on SuperITCH — click on the picture to get the full story on Vanderbilt’s “The Public be Damned!” comment.

Throwing out any subtlety, and getting straight to the point, the below January 13, 1879 Daily Graphic front page – Johnny Morgan Plays the Organ —  shows Vanderbilt in total control of the state legislature, playing them like an organ, pushing buttons labeled Pass, Amend, No, Aye, Postpone, Adjourn, with telegraph wires from the organ plugged into the legislators’ heads, their insides replaced with machinery — robots controlled by Vanderbilt!  

Another Daily Graphic front page, from October 30, 1882, titled A Nightmare of the Future, shows monopolist Vanderbilt strangling Columbia (i.e., the United States).

Left, by cartoonist Billy Ireland in the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, and reprinted in the November 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine, we have It’s an Ill Wind, depicting a Senate Committee investigation having caught the G.O.P. taking bribes from Wall Street in 1904, with a starved Democratic donkey happy that Wall Street had been ignoring feeding him for years.

Below — in imagery perfect for Halloween — Fred Opper yet again, depicting monopolist, Wall Street manipulator, and loyal purchaser of Republican legislators, Jay Gould, in control of Hell — from the center double-page spread of the September 19th, 1883 issue of PuckMonopoly in Hades.

To find more past postings involving corporate abuses, click here.

And, here, to find prior Election Cartoons postings.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform ElectionCartoons NYPuck NYDailyGraphic W.A. Ireland John Campbell Cory CongressCartoons

Doug
Doug

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Booksteve Reviews–The Vault of Walt by Jim Korkis

AS prolific as Craig is with all of his enjoyable recent releases, it’s easy to forget that he isn’t the only author out there with a worthy product! Here’s my review of the new book The Vault of Walt by animation historian and Disney expert Jim Korkis! This review–in case it seems familiar–was originally published in slightly different form at Booksteve’s Library.

First thing this morning I noticed that Mark Evanier had posted a review of Jim Korkis’ new book, The Vault of Walt. Seeing as how I had just finally finished my review copy of that same book, I purposely did not read Mark’s piece but I have no doubt that it was a recommendation.

Jim Korkis has been one of my favorite writers on animation for literally decades now. He is known throughout the world for his expertise on all things Disney and Disney fans everywhere should rejoice that he is sharing these episodic and anecdotal historical stories with us!

First of all, The Vault of Walt is, in spite of what its title may imply, NOT about the scandals often linked these days to Disney. No matter how hard you look here, you will not find the Satan-worshipping, Nazi-sympathizing, anti-Semitic child molesting, deep frozen Disney who lurks in the dark recesses of Disney fandom on the Net. Nor will you find the sainted artistic genius that never made a misstep and was beloved by all who knew him. No, Korkis introduces us in snippets to the puzzle pieces that end up showing the reader a very real version of “Uncle Walt.”

The Disney in this book is a talented and creative animator and producer with a very good business sense. He loved children and legitimately wanted to entertain them but had a very good understanding of how to make a profit doing so.

In the  book, you’ll find out the truth about Walt’s FBI connection, his membership in the DeMolay organization and his very memorable 30th wedding anniversary. Even though I have never had the pleasure of visiting any of the Disney theme parks, the many segments offering background and behind-the-scenes stories about Disneyland and Epcot are informative and interesting. For me, though, the best parts were the looks at Disney’s personal involvement with a number of films from The Three Little Pigs up through Blackbeard’s Ghost and even, unexpectedly, 1970’s The Aristocats. My favorite piece is about the notorious Atlanta premiere of Song of the South in which the African-American actors, while consistently praised, were not even allowed in the theater…or much of downtown Atlanta in fact! You’ll find characters such as Ward Kimball, Salvador Dali, Chuck Jones, Zorro, a cigarette smoking chimp and the equally interesting Disney family themselves including Walt’s wife and daughters.

Much of Korkis’ book had originally been written as columns so one can easily skip around and always find something new and fascinating. The style is breezy but always informative with the author making even the most minute events feel important to the reader. For fans of today’s Disney mega-conglomerate, there’s little here to interest you. If, however, you’re one of the millions who grew up with Uncle Walt, then The Vault of Walt offers some intriguing, insightful and incisive portraits of the real man, the world in which he lived…and the world he himself created.

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, October 29, 2010

The Dollar or the Man # 2: The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition

Homer Davenport

In 1900, New York Journal political cartoonist Homer Davenport published a collection of his work titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day. The cartoons focused on themes of government corruption and the threat that corporate power posed to America. These themes are with us today and will influence many of the votes cast in next week’s mid-term elections.

Davenport’s cartoons mark the beginning of the Progressive Era, a time when many believed that corporations sought to overthrow the government.

The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport

The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport
Plate VI from The Dollar or the Man, the Issue of To Day, 1900
Originally published in the New York Journal newspaper
7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

In "The Threat Before the Fight," Davenport shows Uncle Sam standing with a clenched fist. An elderly man, a woman with a baby, and a young boy rolling up his sleeves stand in the crowd behind him. They wear the tattered clothes of the "plain people" that Davenport references in his dedication at the front of the book.

Detail of The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport

Detail of
The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport

On the opposite side stands Repulbican political operative Mark Hanna in his dollar-sign suit and diamond tie pin. In his right hand he holds a whip. Behind him is a menacing row of large Trust figures. Tattooed on their chests are the monopolistic corporations they represent: Standard Oil Trust, Sugar Trust, Coal Trust, etc.

Detail of The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport

Detail of
The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition by Homer Davenport

Click here for the previous post in this series  |  Click here to read the next post in this series

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Friday, October 29, 2010

The Monopoly News

In the 1880s, Jay Gould — Monopolist, infamous Wall Street Stock manipulator, and solid Republican (with the caveat that he wasn’t a mere Republican voter, but, that he bought-and-paid for Republican legislators, placed them into office via his money, to control government legislation for his personal benefit) — also owned major New York City newspapers, for the purpose of controlling/creating/suppressing news, as he saw fit, again, to his personal benefit.

Today, in addition to major corporations owning/controlling television networks and their news organizations (such as General Electric until recently owning NBC), plus major advertisers also sometimes affecting the news (such as, years ago, tobacco company influence killing stories about tobacco on CBS), we have a major cable “news” network — Fox “News” –  owned by Republican Party operatives/ideologues, and run as a 24-hour propaganda channel, presenting, inventing, and suppressing news, for the explicit purpose of promoting the Republican Party. Up until the 1980′s, the Federal Communications Commission had a rule known as “The Fairness Doctrine”, which required that all television news be fair and balanced. The other television networks (minus MSNBC, now) still follow those rules, even though they no longer exist. The “Fairness Doctrine” was eliminated by President Ronald Reagan, as step one for the explicit plan to create Fox News as a Republican Propaganda channel. Step Two, was for Reagan and Republicans to pass special legislation to fast track British-born conservative ideologue & activist Rupert Murdoch, to become a U.S. Citizen, as only U.S. Citizens are permitted to own controlling shares in major television networks. They did both, as Murdoch was planning to build/finance, Fox News. 

Fox “News”, with its invention & manipulation of “facts” — such as denial of global warming, and substituting footage of large non-Tea Party crowds to run as people attending Tea Party rallies (when the real rallies didn’t have enough attendees) —  their promotion of fringe right-wing extremist John Birch Society & Libertarian Party ideas via the rantings of Glenn Beck, their having numerous Republican Party former office holders and future-candidates on their payroll as “commentators” (Sarah Palin, Rick Santorum, etc) – have all lead to the destruction of the press as the “fourth rail” of American Democracy. To put it bluntly, in my opinion, Fox News is destructive to our nation and our future. It is yet another turn of the clock, returning us to the political abuses of the 19th century, such as those attacked by the free press cartoonists of that time.     

Below, by cartoonist Frederick Burr Opper, on the rear cover of the October 4th, 1882 issue of Puck magazine, When Jay Gould Owns the Associated Press.

Click on any picture, to open an enlarged version.

Below right – JayGouldAGrams (Gould owned/controlled the telegraph system) — a parody article on the altruic nature of Gould’s ownership of major news outlets, appearing in the same October 4th, 1882 issue of Puck.

The below left Opper cartoon — Convenient Garments for Monopolists (the “garments” being ) newspapers they own — is both from the December 7th, 1881 issue of Puck magazine, and, from an earlier SuperITCH posting by contributor David Donohue, titled Jay Gould, the King of the Robber Barons, Part 2, showing this plus other related cartoons, and going into greater detail on Gould’s ownership & manipulation of the press. Click on the picture, to be taken to David’s article.  

To find more past postings involving corporate abuses, click here.

And, here, to find prior Election Cartoons postings.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYPuck ElectionCartoons NYTribuneFoxNews

Doug
Doug

Friday, October 29, 2010

W@kin’ L!nks # 295

Berni(e) Wrightson doing a coloring book!!??  The seventies were a strange and glorious time and this Phil Seuling-produced volume offers some strange and glorious early art by the master of the macabre. Hopefully no one actually colored these!

http://comicrazys.com/2010/10/28/the-monsters-color-the-creature-book-bernie-wrightson/

Neal Adams was credited with both story and art on this example of the little-remembered Deadman backup series that ran in Aquaman in 1970 and featured what many Adams fans consider his best work on one of the characters with which he is most identified.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2010/10/countdown-to-halloween-2010-admiring.html

Here’s my friend Rich Buckler as closely seen through the original art pages of his Atlas book, Demon Hunter, featuring a character who would, under various names, turn up at several other companies eventually.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2010/10/demon-hunter.html

Finally today, here’s the complete issue of Dick Briefer’s Frankenstein that returned the series to its more horrific version in 1952. If you like what you see and haven’t ordered your copy yet, check elsewhere on this very site for ordering info on Craig’s reprint/history of the series, Dick Briefer’s Frankenstein.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/10/frankenstein-18-march1952-stories-and.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, October 28, 2010

The Dollar or the Man # 1: Gentlemen, Let Me Introduce My Friend

With less than a week to go before the 2010 mid-term elections, Republican Tea Party candidates are riding a wave of voter anger to successfully challenge political incumbents. The Tea Partiers dodge the media and offer sketchy details on what they will do if elected. They struggle to distance themselves from their previous public statements that support the privatization of Social Security, the elimination of Unions and the Federal minimum wage, as well as cutbacks in public education.

The success of their campaigns can be largely attributed to the support of the conservative media and anonymous unlimited corporate donations made possible by the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. The Tea Partiers’ small-government, pro-business agenda has become a useful tool of corporations attempting to protect record-breaking profits by opposing the possibility of government initiatives that could reduce or eliminate tax breaks, job outsourcing and predatory business practices. The Citizens United ruling made it legal for corporations to effectively purchase positions in the government by financing candidates willing to follow a corporate agenda. Using divisive, deceptive, fear-based and authoritarian political tactics, they threaten to turn back the clock to an earlier time like the late 1800s, when unfettered capitalism played a similar role in government elections.

In the 1890s, Homer Davenport was one of the most famous (and highly paid) political cartoonists in America. He covered the presidential elections of 1896 and 1900 for William Randolph Hearst’s New York Journal.

Homer Davenport

Homer Davenport
c. 1902

A collection of his work titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day was published in 1900. It includes 54 large reproductions of cartoons that originally appeared in the Journal . Their subject matter was government corruption and the abuse of corporate power.

The Dollar or the Man by Homer Davenport

The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day by Homer Davenport
Small, Maynard & Co., Boston
1900, 134 pgs; 66 plates, approx. 7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

Davenport created the Trust Figure to represent the monopolistic corporations of his time. The coal trust, sugar trust and meat trust were all depicted as bearded, hulking brutes that clubbed their competition and critics into submission.

Let Me Introduce My Friend by Homer Davenport

"Gentlemen, let me introduce my friend" by Homer Davenport

Plate XLIV from The Dollar or the Man, the Issue of To Day, 1900
7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

During the 1896 election, Davenport connected the Trust figures to Mark Hanna, a wealthy Ohio industrialist and shipping magnate who became chairman of the National Republican Committee. Davenport caricatured Hanna in a suit covered with dollar signs as a reference to the formidable fundraising skills that had earned Hanna the nickname, "Dollar Mark."

Photo of Mark Hanna and Caricature of Mark Hanna by Homer Davenport

As the campaign manager for Presidential candidate William McKinley, Hanna systemized fundraising from big business. He visited the leaders of large corporations and major banks who feared the populist rhetoric or McKinley’s opponent: William Jennings Bryan. Bryan represented the Populist Party which advocated public ownership of the railroads, steamship lines and telephone and telegraph systems.Hanna raised a record $3.5 million for the campaign – roughly $3 billion in today’s dollars. The Republicans spent five times more money than the Democrats in the 1896 campaign.

McKinley won the election and a second term in 1900. He protected the interests of big business and did little to alleviate the social problems caused by industrialization. By 1901, McKinley no longer supported the growth of big business. He recognized that trusts and monopolies hurt competition and kept prices high for the consumer. In September of 1901 McKinley was assassinated by a man who reportedly confessed: "I killed the President because he was the enemy of the good people – the good working people. I am not sorry for my crime."

Click here to read the next post in this series

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com | Tea Party | Trusts

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

SUBSCRIBE