Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » January
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for January, 2012

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Ghost Rider In The Sky

Just 16 more days until the release of Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance, and the I.T.C.H. headquarters are blazing with excitement. The only way to burn off some of this energy is to play another red-hot Ghost Rider track! And this Tuesday we have a completely unique situation in the history of comics tunes.

On previous Tuesdays we’ve shared songs written about comics characters, songs inspired by comics characters, and songs that coincidently have the same names as comics characters (but are completely unrelated). This week it’s the old switcheroo. Here we have a comic book character inspired by a song!

Yes, you read that right. The song came first, then the character.

One of the biggest country hits of all time, recorded by a kajillion different artists, was written in 1948. Titled “(Ghost) Riders In The Sky” it was penned by Stan Jones (not Stan Lee!).

The song was so cool and spooky, with a catchy melody based on “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again,” that it caught on like wildfire. First recorded by Burl Ives, the song inspired a western comic character called (naturally) Ghost Rider.

Whether you call him Night Rider, Phantom Rider, Haunted Horseman, or good old Ghost Rider, he wore a mask and rode a horse – not unlike the spooky riders in the sky in the song.

The original comic was published by Magazine Enterprises in 1949 with art by Dick Ayers. Marvel Comics revived the hooded horseman hero in 1967, again drawn by Darlin’ Dick Ayers.

It wasn’t until 1972 that Ghost Rider traded in his horse for a motorcycle and his head caught fire. (Ouch!)

Today we have a very different character, the skull-headed, cycle-riding, flaming hero from Hell we all know and love. But if it wasn’t for this song, he never would have existed. Wow. That’s heavy.

Versions of this song were recorded by a diverse list of performers including: Vaughn Monroe and His Orchestra, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee, Christopher Lee (no relation), The Sons of the Pioneers, the Norman Luboff Choir, The Ramrods, Frankie Laine, Dick Dale, The Blues Brothers, Deborah Harry, The Ventures, the Dixie Chicks, The Outlaws, Marty Robbins, Spike Jones and his City Slickers, Gene Autry, and Lawrence Welk, to name just a few.

Today I’m sharing the version by Johnny Cash, the Man in Black. Not just because the Ghost Rider’s name was Johnny and he dresses in black, but because Johnny Cash was about the coolest guy on the planet.

Click the link below to listen.

Ghost Riders In The Sky – Johnny Cash

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

The Bogus Workingman & The Grand Old Republican Party of Moral Ideas, 1884

Today being the Florida Primary, I’ve picked two Puck magazine front cover cartoons by artist Frederick Burr Opper, one each representative of the current two G.O.P front-runners. Which cartoon I feel matches which current candidate, is so obvious, I need not specify.

Above (and unfortunately including a racist caricature which is not really part of the point of the cartoon), we see the eternal image of a ridiculously wealthy politician, attempting to pass himself as the common man. The Bogus Workingman and His Lonesome Boom, depicting General Benjamin Franklin Butler, of the Greenback/Anti-Monopoly Party, appeared on September 10th, 1884 cover of Puck. Butler’s usual dress hangs in the rear, next to his vault of bonds, while railroad stock, monopolist fees, and “tools for exhibition purposes” litter the floor.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view them in detail, and read the captions.

Below, from the cover of the July 16th, 1884 issue, depicting the hypocrisy of the “Grand Old Republican Party of Moral Ideas”, decrying “The Three Last Speakers of the Untrustworthy and Disreputable Democratic Party” (portraits on back of wall), while the three most recent Republican speakers were known for far worse corruption. Front and center is shown eventual 1884 Republican Party Presidential Nominee, James G. Blaine, known nationally as “The Liar from Maine”, whose various issues of corruption and impropriety lost the Republican Party the presidency for the first time post-Civil War.

Doug Wheeler

NYPuck ElectionComics

Doug
Doug

Monday, January 30, 2012

Sports & Concrete Furniture: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, January 1912, Part 7

WARNING: Some of the below cartoons contain racist imagery and slurs.

We close out our extracts from the January 1912 issue of Cartoons Magazine, with Sports, and Concrete Furniture.

Yes, concrete furniture.

When I spotted the first cartoon above, I at first thought this was a totally fascetious joke. Then I noticed a second concrete furniture cartoon, from a different newspaper, right next to it.

So I checked it out, and yes. Yes, indeed. Thomas A. Edison not only invented concrete furniture (check out this December 9th, 1911 article in the New York Times), but, he had previously invented cement houses, for that furniture to go into.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view them in detail, and read the captions.

Above, three baseball cartoons involving the 1911 World Series Ticket Scandal, in which the American League wanted the New York Giants kicked out of the National League, for having sold World Series Tickets directly to speculators and ticket scalpers, for a kick back.

Below, two cartoons from artist Clare Briggs’ Kelly Pool series.

Finally, we get an early start on February’s African American History Month, with the below page of racist cartoons concerning world heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson. The term “Great White Hope” was applied by boxing promoters, to a series of white opponents — all unsuccessful — that they threw at Johnson. Whites were highly resentful of his victories. The below cartoons, make reference to the return of Johnson to the U.S., from a 1911 match in England.

Next month, we continue with the February issue.

Doug Wheeler

BlackHistory Tigwissel Tuesdays Ole May baseball cartoons billiards pool

Doug
Doug

Monday, January 30, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Green Giant Comics #1

Though I have read hundreds of Golden Age comic books there’s still plenty I still desperately want to read that I haven’t been able to find anywhere.  For instance,  Green Giant Comics.  I believe I first saw it’s oddball and iconic cover in Steranko’s History of Comics when I were but a lad.  This one has always escaped me, until a couple of days when Green Giant Comics #1 appeared at the Digital Comics Museum website (blessings be upon it).

So, with of that accumulated anticipation weighing down upon it the only real question, really, is, does Green Giant Comics live up to my twisted expectations?  The answer is, oh, yes, this is one very weird, awkward looking comic book.  Almost nothing is known about it but to quote from the Public Domain Super Heroes Wikia (long may it wave):

According to the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide (2000),Green Giant Comics #1 was an experiment to determine if the company could profitably manufacture and distribute comics with their otherwise idle printing presses. The Moreau Publishing company believes the book was never released to news stands.

And as pointed out by Steve Thompson, these are the same people who produced Motion Picture Funnies Weekly as well as packaged  Marvel Comics #1

For the record as far as I can tell the above Green Giant has nothing to do with Green Giant brand vegetables which predates it, though it’s mascot, the Green Giant, wasn’t introduced until 1950.

In #1 we’re introduced to the Green Giant who is secretly a certain Mr. Brentwood  (we never get on a first name basis with him) who with the help of his size changing belt and his “tunic” (there’s a word you don’t hear every day) takes on Wall St. malfeasance as only a masked green giant can.

Among the “all new” features mentioned on the cover was  Doctor Nerod, Super-Scientist, one of your standard 40′s two-fisted scientist/adventurers.  I had always assumed that the term “super-scientist” was of fairly recent vintage (if it didn’t originate with The Venture Bros. series the show at least helped popularize it).  But apparently this is not the case.

And finally there’s Master Mystic, another Golden Age character who can, essentially, do absolutely everything.

 

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Monday, January 30, 2012

Boxin’ Gloves # 552

 

 

 

 

Here’s one of this year’s just-announced Eisner hall of Fame winners, Harry Lucey, with one of his best known non-Archie strips, Sam Hill, Private Eye. 

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2011/11/number-1097-we-love-lucey-harry-lucey.html

Here’s a brief but interesting article about death in comics, something which has been proven to be quite different than death in real life.

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2012/01/and-on-third-issue-he-arose-again.html

Nick Caputo lives up to the minutiae part of his blog’s title with an in-depth look at a single pasted over panel from an early sixties Thor comic.

http://nick-caputo.blogspot.com/2012/01/journey-into-minutiae-undocumented.html

Finally, here’s another plug for the single best comics artist not drawing comics today, Loston Wallace! Consider a commission from him.

http://www.lostonwallace.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Women’s History: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, January 1912, Part 6

I’m approaching two years here on SuperI.T.C.H., during which what examples of Women’s Suffrage cartoons I’ve shown have basically been in March, during Women’s History Month. However, female suffrage appeared frequently as a subject in Cartoons Magazine, so count on seeing a few examples throughout this year, as I continue to post month-by-month extracts in honor of that magazine’s centennial anniversary. Above, from the January 1912 issue, is a page of cartoons from three different cities, where in each, city mayors are finding themselves confronted by the power of women, whether they yet have the right to vote or not.

Below, simultaneous to presenting the issue of Women’s Suffrage, Cartoons Magazine (as representative of the nation’s newspapers and magazines in general), would in the same publication, present women as generally concerned with fashion, and competing in it against each other. This could — in publications of that time — subtly undercut any pro-suffrage cartoons. Showing both here together — as they were back in the day — gives a more complete view of the overall atmosphere and culture.

Each of the below cartoons, originated in European publications. But they also appeared in various American newspapers and magazines, as many were in the habit of regularly running a few translated foreign cartoons.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view them in detail, and read the captions.

Finally, below, an image that would have been great for next month’s Valentine’s and Super Bowl. An All the Year Sport, depicts a young woman of the Age, as heart breaker, punting men’s hearts.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionCartoons football Ole May

Doug
Doug

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Makin’ Payments?

 

 

 

 

These next few days may offer some of my last posts for a while if we aren’t able to put together enough money to catch up on our Internet bill by the first of the month.

As some of you may know, we have been selling off items from Booksteve’s Library over at our site Booksteve’s Bookstore Plus! Prices like you’ve never seen on scarce and esoteric comics and pop culture items! We’d appreciate it if you’d take  a look and see if there’s anything that you would like. All proceeds at this time will go toward our $200.00 phone/cable/Internet  bill!

Here’s just a few items of interest to comics fans!

Wally Wood’s Weird Sex Fantasy Portfolio, signed and numbered–has sold for $$$ on eBay. Only $150.00!

http://bookstevesbookstore.blogspot.com/2011/11/new-lower-priceswally-woods-weird-sex.html

Monte Beauchamp’s Blab, issue 2, all about Mars Attacks and he EC/Undergrounds connection.

http://bookstevesbookstore.blogspot.com/2011/10/blab-2.html

Dan O’Neill’s Odd Bodkins in Buy This Book!

http://bookstevesbookstore.blogspot.com/2011/11/buy-this-book-of-odd-bodkins-by-dan.html

A rare Flintstones Little Golden Book pre-dating the TV series and with lovely art by Mel Crawford.

http://bookstevesbookstore.blogspot.com/2011/11/flintstones-little-golden-book-1961.html

 

Here’s a sixties Kenner See-A-Show complete with many Marvel Super Heroes slides!

http://bookstevesbookstore.blogspot.com/2012/01/kenner-see-show-viewer-and-slides.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, January 27, 2012

Booksteve Reviews–Wally Wood Strange Worlds

ORIGINALLY POSTED AT HOORAY FOR WALLY WOOD
Lest one think that Yoe Books is the only one making classic comics material more readily available these days–
From out of deepest space and via time warp from the far-flung fifties comes STRANGE WORLDS, the ultimate collection of Wallace Wood’s early, non-EC science fiction and fantasy stories.
This is not a book to introduce one’s self to Wood, arguably the greatest sci-fi illustrator of the 20th Century. No, STRANGE WORLDS is a book for Wood fans who want the big picture. What we have here is the chance to watch the artist’s astonishingly rapid development from almost crude beginnings to his fabled mastery of storytelling, composition and shadows, all in just the few short years featured herein. Between black and white reprints and online scans, the true connoisseur has seen most of this work before but oh, to have it now in such a nice chronological presentation with lovingly restored color from the original issues of SPACE DETECTIVE, CAPTAIN SCIENCE, AMAZING ADVENTURES and other long-forgotten four-color treasures! Words fail.
To be honest, the stories themselves aren’t much, many being clichéd space opera of the most antiquated sort. But this isn’t a book about stories. It’s a book about art. Wood’s early collaborations with Joe Orlando are present as well as work done with Al Williamson, Frank Frazetta and even Jack Kirby. And every one is a revelation to Wood fans, showing off his enthusiasm for outer space stories and his experimentations as he became the genius he would so quickly become.
So exactly what is in STRANGE WORLDS? To start with, there’s THE FLYING SAUCERS, a fairly serious full-length tale exploiting UFO’s when they were in the news almost daily. Then there’s AN EARTHMAN ON VENUS, inexplicably appearing in black and white. There are a number of series entries with characters including  the aforementioned Captain Science and Space Detective as well as Kenton of the Star Patrol and Rocky X of the Rocketeers. Dotted around these are one-off stories from various publishers with the book finishing up with a post-EC tale from Atlas and some beautifully colored continuity from the SKY MASTERS OF THE SPACE FORCE  newspaper strip in which Wood inked Jack Kirby in what many have called the best work of either artist! In between many of the stories are original art panels and pages from some of the artist’s best-known EC classics which can be used to compare his development.
All of this is wrapped up in David Spurlock’s beautiful packaging. The front cover of the regular edition is a “new” piece of Wally Wood art produced by the great designer and artist, Jim Steranko, utilizing bits and pieces from various Wood illustrations. In this manner, Jim has created Woodwork that highlights Wood’s trademark spaceman, a sexy woman and a sleek rocket all amidst a screen-laden planetscape.
In case anyone hasn’t been paying attention, let me say it plainly—This is a gorgeous volume!
The limited slipcase edition flops the new cover to the back and spotlights on its front the amazing Wood/Adkins cover for a 1964 record album of H.G. Wells’ WAR OF THE WORLDS. It also offers an additional portfolio of the little-seen inside front cover art that Wood did for many of the Avon titles on which he worked in the 1950’s.
Wallace Wood took his own life in 1981, more than 30 years ago now. And yet 2012 looks to be Wood’s best year ever with forthcoming Wood projects from Fantagraphics and IDW (and a couple more rumored but as yet officially unannounced!). It all starts, just like Woody did, with Vanguard’s STRANGE WORLDS. You should start there, too!
The hardcover and the limited edition are out now and the softcover is coming soon. You can order your copy today at:  http://www.vanguardproductions.net/Wood3/index
Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Why Do They Do It?, 1888

Above, detail from the rear cover cartoon of the September 19th, 1888 issue of Puck magazine. In this section close-up, we see the prior election’s (1884′s) Republican nominee for President, James G. Blaine — the Victorian Age’s equivalent of Newt Gingrich in corruption and scandal — leading a bound (by monopoly interests) Republican Party by it’s nose. Artist Frederick Burr Opper asks the question, “Why does the Republican Party allow itself to be led like this any longer?” One-hundred and twenty-four years later, we’re still asking this question.

Below, the complete back page of cartoons, collectively titled, Why Do They Do It? — Things that Puzzle “Puck”.

Click on either the above or below, to view the full page in detail.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionCartoons NYPuck

Doug
Doug

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Crossin’ Swords # 551

 

 

Let’s start with a genuine piece of Marvel Comics history–a revealing 1963 letter from Stan Lee to comic fandom legend and founder, Jerry Bails.

http://blastr.com/2012/01/1963-stan-lee-letter-to-f.php

Tony Isabella’s Bloggy Thing features the fun, nostalgic, knowledgable and highly opinionated rants of legendary comics author and editor Tony Isabella!

http://tonyisabella.blogspot.com/

Here’s a nice cover gallery featuring Joe Kubert’s great Tarzan covers done for DC in the seventies.

http://comicbookcatacombs.blogspot.com/2012/01/tarzan-cover-gallery.html

Finally, some remarkably rare Frazetta art is on display here including the legendary fantasy artist’s attempts at home design!

http://fritzfrazetta.blogspot.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

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