Super I.T.C.H » 2006 » July
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for July, 2006

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Off To Comic-Con

I’m on my way to the San Diego Comic-Con, so this will be my last post until next week. My first order of business will be take the drawing below to the Bud Plant booth for a contest he’s holding. Bud will be giving away as prizes over 12 pieces of original artwork ranging from artists from Dean Yeagle to Mark Schultz

Mr. Smart Ass and Red Fanny are characters that I created and debuted in my latest book Arf Museum. Luke McDonnell did this original artwork for Bud’s contest. Luke is an amazing artist who has drawn for DC and Marvel comics and now we have the great pleasure of working with him a YOE! Studio. Today is Luke’s Birthday — Happy Birthday Luke! I’ll pick up a birthday present for Luke at Bud Plant’s booth. Bud Plant’s booth is my favorite place to shop at the San Diego Comic-Con.


(Click for close-up)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

It’s Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday!

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, July 18, 2006

William Boniface: No Ordinary Writer!


William Boniface. (photo courtsey of Bill Jones)

The Extraordinary Adventures of Ordinary Boy is a brand new series from HarperCollins Publishers that tips the world of superheroes on its head.After all, what would society be like if everyone had a super power? Now imagine that you’re the only member of that society who doesn’t have a power. Book One of the series, The Hero Revealed, has just gone on sale and answers that question in a funny, fast-paced way that owes more to The Simpsons than to Superman. The author of the book, William Boniface, tells Arf Lovers a little about the book and his influences in creating it.

1. Tell us about Ordinary Boy.

Ordinary Boy is an eleven year old boy who lives in the city of Superopolis. As you might guess from its name, Superopolis is a city of heroes (and villains) where every citizen has a super power. Just as with looks, talent and brains, however, people’s powers are hardly equal. Some have an incredible power, like the city’s greatest hero, the Amazing Indestructo (who can’t be harmed by anything), or his arch-nemesis, Professor Brain-Drain, who can sap a person’s intelligence just by laying a finger to their head. Others have powers that are less impressive, like a kid in Ordinary Boy’s class named Melonhead who continuously spits seeds and drools watermelon juice. But at least he has a power, which is the one thing that cannot be said for Ordinary Boy. As his name implies, he has no power. However, he is a pretty bright kid. But in a city where people depend on their power more than their smarts nobody puts much value on intelligence. Any similarities to our own society are purely coincidental.

2. This book clearly shows a love for comic books. Did anyone influence you in particular?

The first comic books I ever fell in love with were the Disney comics of Carl Barks. Of course it wasn’t until years later that I knew his name, but at that point his style of storytelling had rooted itself in my brain. The central storyline of my book is nothing at all like the stories Barks wrote, with the exception of a couple of obvious tips of the hat, but I think the flavor of how he wrote is all over the place. This is mostly true in regard to the language. Barks never wrote down to his audience, and even as a child I instinctively appreciated that, even if I didn’t always understand his words and references. But through his stories I increased my vocabulary and general knowledge enormously. In writing this book, it was sometimes a struggle with my editor to leave in words that probably aren’t part of your average ten-year-old’s vocabulary.

3. Can you give an example?

Well, the Amazing Indestructo is every kid’s ideal super hero, but he’s basically a money hungry ego-maniac who has licensed and commercialized himself in every way possible. At one point, my group of kids is in an arcade. One of the dimmer ones finds a big, flashy machine that he keeps dropping quarters into, but all it does is make noises and set off lights. Posted on the machine is a sign that reads: The Amazing Indestructo Game: Help A.I. Fend Off An Insolvent Future! My editor was insisting that no kid would know what the word insolvent meant, and she’s probably right. But that was the whole joke, and I don’t think it’s such a bad thing to send kids scrambling to the dictionary to figure it out.

4. Was there anyone else who influenced you?

John Stanley is probably the second most evident influence. He had such a remarkable knack for creating funny situations in the most mundane of settings. Despite the fantastical nature of my central premise, I think I’ve done a good job of creating a world where life is just like it is in the normal, day-to-day world, including all of the everyday failings and foibles that come along with it. My characters just happen to have one additional quirk – a super power. But I think the most important similarity to Stanley is the freedom I allow my kid characters. In the Little Lulu comics, Stanley gave his kids free reign to roam wherever they liked, with little or no parental supervision. I had that liberty when I was growing up, but I think kids today have largely lost that kind of independence. I’ve also purposely eliminated most modern distractions, including anything computer related. TV’s are about as far as technology has advanced in my world.

5. Have the recent superhero movies geared toward kids been an influence?

Actually, this book was finished and sold almost a year before The Incredibles came out, and I was about two thirds of the way through writing Book Two in the series at the time of the movie’s release. HarperCollins, my publisher, works way out, giving themselves loads of time to edit and illustrate the books they do. I was nervous at first that there might be similarities with The Incredibles, but was relieved to find that there really weren’t any. And the fact that it was an exceptionally good movie just helps the genre overall.

6. If you could have a super power, what would it be?

I have a character that doesn’t appear until book two named the Animator. He has the ability to bring any inanimate object to life. I think that would be a pretty cool power to have. What would your power be, Craig?

Sorry, Jon, but I’m gonna have to answer, "Duh. X-ray vision". I never understood why this was even a question for any red blooded guy.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Monday, July 17, 2006

Factoid #1,267,945: Mayor LaGuardia Reads The Comics On The Radio

For Arf III I’m collecting images for a chapter on Reading Comics. There’s a lot of fantastic photos, comic book covers, drawings, and advertising on this subject.
I welcome suggestions Arf Lovers might have.

Probably the most famous instance of “reading comics” is NYC Mayor LaGuardia reading comics over the radio during a newspaper strike in 1945. Here is a photo from that famous broadcast.


NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia reading the comics on the radio.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Friday, July 14, 2006

God Bless Publishers Weekly…

…they made Arf Museum the lead off cover review for their Publishers Weekly Comics site. They had some interesting things to say so I’m reprinting their thoughts for the interst of Arf Lovers everywhere:

“Having curated actual museum shows, cartoonist/designer Yoe turns to the print medium to exhibit little known cartoon art. Appropriately, the book opens with cartoons about fine art museums by Charles Addams, Chester Gould, Cliff Sterrett and others. Some of these works, like Frank King’s, demonstrate links between cartooning and “high” art.


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Others, including an essay by Rube Goldberg, voice a populist disdain for modern art and art critics. In the wake of the King Kong remake, Yoe presents works pairing apes and women, running a gamut from horror to simple titillation, such as photos of Bettie Page with guys in literal monkey suits.


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A segment on tattooing includes an EC-style horror tale written, surprisingly, by Stan Lee.


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In the book’s most extraordinary works, 19th-century cartoonist Charles Bennett transforms animals into humans through a succession of images that Yoe insightfully compares to CGI “morphing” effects.

(click for close-up)Other highlights are remarkable, previously unpublished color paintings by Richard Outcault of the Yellow Kid, American comics’ first iconic character. The book concludes with an examination of Picasso’s interest in the comics. Lavishly illustrated, this survey of the long history of pop art entertains with a succession of bold, unexpected images.(July)
Copyright © 1997-2005 Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.”


(click for close-up)

Hope to see some of you soon in San Diego!

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Friday, July 14, 2006

Super, Man!

Wonder Woman isn’t the only one prone to wackiness. In celebration of the Supe movie here’s some wacked photos of the Man of Steel.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Thursday, July 13, 2006

Max Halverson 1924-2006 WWII Combat Cartoonist

Rose Halverson has written me that her “dear Max” has passed away after a two month brave fight against cancer. Max got an early start in cartooning drawing postcards at the tender age of fifteen for a few small publishers. These included anti-Axis cards done in a charming animation style. Max had incredible enthusiasm for cartooning and did it for family and friends till the end.


(click for close-up)
The above card is from the collection of Susan Hack-Lane, the Arf co-publicist at YOE! Studio.


Max sent the above incredible cartoon cacophony and told me “while in high school I did all the cartoons for their publications”.
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Here’s a self portrait Max did for me.
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Following are the newspaper panel cartoons Max did while he was in the war. They were distributed by the The Register and Tribune Syndicate. They were done in a delightful Halverson meets Bill Maudlin style.


“Two years in combt and then I do this playing baseball!”
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“I finally got that box from home—It was a pair of lounging slippers! ”
(click for close-up)


“That settles it—tomorrow I’m changing to summer underwear! ”
(click for close-up)


“Well, well—if it ain’t Bill Jones—what the hell are you doing here?”
(click for close-up)

This last one below Max informed me was “one I never sent in”.


“I wish that you would make your boys stop whistling
at me while I’m taking a sunbath!”
(click for close-up)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Wednesday, July 12, 2006

It’s Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday!

Yo, Craig!

I know you’re looking for a subtle way to plug our upcoming Comic Con panel, *Masters of American Comics*. You remember, right? The one on Friday, July 21st, from 5.30 to 7 pm, in room 8. With Yoe’s truly and me: Mike Dooley. And Brian Walker! And Denis Kitchen! And Cynthia Burlingham and Claudine Dixon from the Hammer Museum! The one where we’re all going to reveal the inside skinny about that exhibition everyone’s talking about! Yeah, that one.
Well, check out the photo above. It’s Kevin Dooley, infamous former editor at *Amazing Heroes* and DC Comics (oh, the stories he can tell) with his wife, Cathy, a.k.a.: Wonder Woman! Perfect for Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday, eh?

Well, guess what? Kevin just happens to be my baby brother. YOW! Weird but true. AND! These shots were taken at my house this past Halloween, when I threw a Come As Your Favorite Comics Character party in celebration of the release of *The Education of a Comics Artist*, the book (to which you contributed) that led to my participation in the Masters show, which led to my organizing our Masters session, see it’s all beginning to make sense now! I’ll see you at the panel!

~ Mike Dooley

Sounds good, Mike. So, Arf Lovers, come to what is sure to be a great panel. And, yes, we’ll try to drag in some Wacky Wonder Women from the convention to add to the festivities!

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Art for Arf’s Sake

Art Spiegelman very kindly did an autograph and drawing on his page in copies of Arf Museum at the MoCCA festival. I thought I’d show you the one he did for me for your enjoyment. The page about Art is in the section about cartoonists riffing on Picasso. That follows a section in the book about Picasso’s own comics and cartoons (including one about farting!)


(click for Close-up)


(click for Close-up)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Monday, July 10, 2006

David Cowles-Master Caricaturist


David Cowles.

David Cowles is a brilliant contemporary caricaturist and I’m thrilled that he has contributed his brilliance to Modern Arf with his portrait of Jack Kirby and Arf Museum with his wonderful caricture of R. F. Outcault. I was also thrilled to hear he just self published a must have book of his work and that I was able to get him to sit still for an Arf Gimme Five interview…

1. Did you start off drawing caricatures of your teachers?

Not too many of teachers. I mostly drew monsters, or my own versions of Mad magazine movie parodies. When I was 11, I did a knock off of The Godfather, strictly from my older brother telling me what happened in it, since I was too young to see it, and some reference photos from Time magazine. For a long time after that I thought Al Pacino and Dustin Hoffman were the same person.

2. Who are your favorite caricaturists?

I think my all time favorite, and the biggest influence on me, is Miguel Covarrubias. I find his stuff from the 20s and 30s just amazing, and it was through him that I saw the influence of Myan and other primitive art influencing what became that golden age of caricature, much like African masks lead Picasso into Cubism. Hirschfeld and Garretto are other big influence, especially in terms of simplification. Mort Drucker was my god for a lot of my childhood, and I poured over his stuff in Mad, and in a book my dad got out ofthe library once on Humorous Illustration. Of the current guys, Risko was a huge influence. I first saw some of his early stuff in a book called Fame, and was awe struck. Again with it’s simplicity. It helped to shake me out of my early cross-hatching phase. Burke I loved. I think that Hanoc Piven is a freaking genius. And Terry Allen is somebody who doesn’t do caricature that often, but when he does, they’re amazing. A big influence on me in terms of color and shape.

3. Who’s the hardest person you ever had to caricature? Who’s the easiest?

The hardest might be Tom Hanks, in that I’m not sure that I’ve ever quite captured him. William Shatner I have trouble with as well. As for the easiest, it’s probably Prince, in that I can hit a likeness with him with so little. I could say that Jay leno is easy, because he’s all ready a bit of a caricature, but when I’ve drawn him, I always feel like I’m exaggerating his features so much, but then when I’m finished, it practically looks like I traced his photo.


David takes a shot at Tom Hanks.


Ol’ Lantern-jawed Leno gets the Cowles treatment.


David says, Prince is the easist to caricature. David makes his work LOOK easy, anyway.

4. Arf readers have loved your caricatures, David, of the cartoonists Arf has featured. Tell us about doing the Jack Kirby for Modern Arf and the R.F. Outcault for Arf Musuem.

The Jack Kirby one was a lot of fun for me. especially since he was another art god. When I was actually reading comics, back in the early 70s, I couldn’t quite get the stuff he was doing then. My comic reading buddies and I used to call him “square fingers” because there was no room for stylized art in comics for us at that point. Much like Picasso was out of my depth then. John Buscema was my hero at that point. But over the years, whenever I had an assignment that they wanted to look superhero-like, I would always fall back onto the Kirby tricks of the “shine squiqqle” and the forced perspective. Now, I’m a total fan. Although, for all my hero worship, I wasn’t really sure what he looked like, so I struggled with the likeness a bit, until we found the right photo reference. So it was appropriate, in terms of my past, to do him in the Picasso style. I love doing the Picasso knock-offs, but always forget how hard it is to achieve until I start painting.

R.F. Outcault I wasn’t as familiar with, outside of some stray Yellow Kid pages I’d seen reproduced over the years. Which sort of made it easier to do his portrait. I find having deep oinions one way of the other kind of hurts my style of caricature. Sometimes it works best to approach the faces as pure design. So, on this one I sort of went more in the Braque direction, with the bit of newspaper and lots of browns.


Jack Kirby as seen by Cowles starting off the chapter on The King inModern Arf.


The latest Arf book, Arf Museum, has this portrait of R. F. Outcault the creator of The Yellow Kid.

5. I’m excited to hear YOU have a book available, please tell us about it.

I’m excited as well. Over the past 23 years or so as an illustrator, people have asked me when I was going to put out a book of my stuff. My response was always “Why, do you know somebody in publishing?” But with all of the other changes the Internet has brought, I can finally put out a D.I.Y. collection of my stuff. Having decided to do it, though, it was a little tough to figure out what should go in it. I wanted enough to hit all the portraits I thought worked, but I wanted also to keep it manageable enough a size so I wouldn’t wear out my welcome half way through. I’m really happy with the collection that I ended up with, trying to group them into categories like musicians, comedians, etc., and trying for the most part to find some sort of relationship between the people on facing pages. It’s a pretty good sampling of my stuff from the years. Thanks for asking.


The Art of David Cowles

Click on the above title learn more and to order this incredible book.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

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