Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » June
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for June, 2010

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Caricature vs. the Corporation # 07: Takeover vs. Receivership: Are "Licensed Wreckers" in the Future of BP?

BP Share Price Chart

BP Stock Value May – June 2010

"The City is buzzing with talk that BP is a potential takeover target after losing more than half of its market value in the wake of the Gulf of Mexico oil leak. Rival energy giants Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell are the most likely candidates to bid for BP … BP’s market value has collapsed by more than $100bn (£67bn) since the April 20 explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig that killed 11 crew members and caused the leak."

Sky News Online

Licensed Wreckers – In the Hands of the Receivers by Joseph Keppler

Licensed Wreckers – In the Hands of the Receivers by Joseph Keppler

March 15, 1882, Vol XI No. 262; Chromolithograph
19″w x 12 1/2 “h

In those halcyon days, when the pious cashier amuses himself by indulging in defalcations, and the bank or insurance company smoothly fails, and the unfortunate depositor finds out that he is the victim of misplaced confidence, the unlucky institution is always placed in the hands of a receiver, who distinguishes himself by receiving all the money that the wreck of the company will yield, and paying out to those who are entitled to the proceedings just nothing at all. It is quite a nice, comfortable, family and friendly arrangement. The Confidence Assurance Society finds out, one fine day, that it is about time that it gave up the pretence of being in sound condition – its directors and officers having used all the surplus cash and easily negotiable securities for their own purposes.

Licensed Wreckers – In the Hands of the Receivers by Joseph Keppler (detail)

The affairs of the corporation are then submitted to the court, the judge of which chooses a receiver, and, strange to say, he never has any difficulty about it; and that is the end of the Confidence Assurance Society, as far as the policy-holders are concerned. But it is a long time before the all-powerful receiver, acting under the authority of the court, has finished with the society. It will support him, his family, his legal friends for years to come. They will never leave the wreck until there is not a spar or a rope’s end, that can be turned into cash, to be got from it. They will strip it as the locusts strip trees of their leaves and fruit. And this kind of business is going on daily around us. The profession of receiver, or licensed wrecker, is a recognized one, for fortunes are to be made in a few years by adopting it. The judges recognize it, and have their favorites who wax rich with such countenance and support. The moral is that it is much better to be a receiver of a bankrupt corporation than a policy-holder or a creditor.

H.C. Bunner, from "Cartoons and Comments" at the front of the issue

Licensed Wreckers – In the Hands of the Receivers by Joseph Keppler (detail)

Click here to see all of the I.T.C.H. posts on Corporations, Wall Street and Financial Reform!

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com | financial reform

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

MAKIN’ LINKS # 222

Pappy addresses the supposedly rampant rumor at the time that African-American comics artist Billy Graham was, in actuality, EC great Graham Ingels returned to comics under an assumed name (as, in fact, Johnny Craig had done for some reason). Although I never heard that rumor, I can see the resemblance in styles.

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2010/06/number-763-i-wake-up-screaming-billy.html

Speaking of EC, the appropriately named Out of This World presents another tribute to the recently deceased Al Williamson by sharing one of his best Flash Gordon outings from the 1966 King series.

http://kb-outofthisworld.blogspot.com/2010/06/in-memory-of-al-williamson-flash-gordon.html

Cartoonist Terry Beatty shares a couple of stories from the artist who is said to have been Stan Lee’s favorite back in the Atlas days, Joe Maneely (above).

http://terrybeatty.blogspot.com/2010/06/vintage-comics-on-web-joe-maneely.html

Finally, here’s a link to my own newest site, Booksteve Transcriptions. If you’re a writer or interviewer and you don’t have time to transcribe your latest talks with comicdom’s greats, email me. I’m inexpensive and accurate.

http://bookstevetranscriptions.blogspot.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

The Career of John Silverthorne — Banker, Part 2: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 52

Below, Part Two of our serialization of Canadian artist Trevor Michael Grover’s series, The Career of John Silverthorne — Banker, which was first published in the Toronto periodical, Saturday Night, and then collected in book form, in 1914. Click here to find Part One.

Click on any picture, to see an enlarged version.

Part Three will appear next week.

Click here to find the prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, while the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, on which I already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Stocks Will Never Go Down! Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 51

Does this look familiar? Two Pictures, But the Same Man, by editorial cartoonist Warren, originally published in the Cleveland News, then soon after reprinted in the August 1930 issue of American Review of Reviews, from which the below scan came.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, during which I’d already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: He’s Got A Bulldog Jaw!

  

It’s been a while since I talked about Dick Tracy (January 22, 12008, to be exact) and it’s long overdue.

A real mainstay of the comics pages, Dick Tracy has long been a favorite of mine, and hopefully, yours too. The edge-of-your-seat plots, the fine detective work, and those bizarre villains!  Dick Tracy inspired countless crime-fighters, even the long-underwear boys. (Batman springs to mind as an obvious example.) And nobody looks better in a yellow slicker. Man, he makes that look work for him!

Besides the terrific comic strips and comic books, there was a Dick Tracy radio show, Dick Tracy movie serials, Dick Tracy feature films, plus lots of Dick Tracy toys and premiums.

Click to view king-size image

In 1961, an animated Dick Tracy TV show introduced politically incorrect ethnic characters: Hemlock Holmes, Joe Jitsu and Go Go Gomez, all of whom are featured in today’s ultra-rare musical selection.

Click the link below to listen. Turn it up!

Dick Tracy – The Chants

David B
DJ David B.

Monday, June 28, 2010

Jerry Beck: Brew Who.



Jerry Beck is The King of Cartoons–a rightly lauded animation historian, author, producer and with Amid Amidi a “brewmaster” for the Cartoon Brew blog. I visit the blog daily without fail for a fix of cool cartoons and lively news about the animated field. There, I first heard about a book Jerry was working on, and then was stoked to have Jerry ask me to contribute one of the essays for The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes Cartoons. This fantastic  book is out now, it’s an incredible read and eye-ball kick and is every bit as entertaining as the cartoons themselves! So, it is a good time to catch up with Jerry…

CRAIG: Jerry, I’ve always, through the years, got the idea that you strongly feel that the Looney Tunes cartoons are the best cartoons ever done and your personal favorite. Now that you’ve written many different books on animation, seen thousands upon thousands of non-Warner Bros. cartoons, run the terrific and religiously read and entertaining Cartoon Brew blog that shows cartoons from all periods and around the world every day for years now, are you STILL of that opinion?

JERRY: I find something to like, or love, about all animated films – but hands down, the original Looney Tunes are the funniest series of cartoons ever made. They set the standard for “funny” and are still inspiring animated films, shorts and TV shows today.

CRAIG: What makes these cartoons so great?

JERRY: What made them so great was the people who made them. I liken the classic 1940s-50s Looney Tunes to the Beatles – or Marvel Comics of the 1960s. It was those particular people, at that particular time that made them so great. What would the Looney Tunes be without Carl Stalling’s music and the Warner Bros. studio orchestra, Mel Blanc’s voices, Treg Brown’s sound effects, Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Bob Clampett, Tex Avery and all the story artists and unique animators? The Looney Tunes were ahead of their time. They were Mad Magazine before Mad Magazine, they were Stan Freberg before Stan Freberg (and it should be noted that Freberg began his career as a voice actor for Warner Bros. cartoons). The artists and animators were left alone, without studio interference, to make what they thought was funny. And they didn’t aim down towards children.

These cartoons, like the best newspaper comic strips, appealed to all: adults and kids alike. Ultimately the studio produced an unprecedented series of classic comedy films – that, in my opinion, rank along side the all-time classics of Hollywood, up there with features like The Wizard of Oz, Casablanca, Gone With the Wind. Like all great art, you can watch them again and again and see something new and funny each time. Does anyone ever tire of watching ONE FROGGY EVENING or DUCK DODGERS IN THE 24th 1/2 CENTURY?

CRAIG: What was your first exposure to Looney Toons and how did that effect you?

JERRY: I was five when The Bugs Bunny Show premiered on ABC in primetime. I watched cartoons all my life and wanted to be a cartoonist. During my high school years I’d come home from school and watch the local syndicated Bugs Bunny cartoons in the afternoon, and it was during those years, as a teenager who should have outgrown them, that I began to appreciate how great they were. I never got the jokes until I was 16. From that point on I had to know everything about these great cartoons.

CRAIG: I’m sure with your passion and research, Jerry, that you met many of the people behind the Warner Bros. cartoons. Do any people, memories or anecdotes stand out?


JERRY: I’ve spent many memorable afternoons and meals with Chuck Jones (above), Friz Freleng and Bob Clampett. I’ll never forget that I had the chance to tell them personally, and sincerely, how much their work was appreciated by myself, and millions of fans. Clampett, in particular, was most appreciative of my efforts to document the Looney Tunes and would send me all sorts of newspaper clippings and gifts. Bob had asked me which other cartoonists I liked and I had mentioned Milt Gross. The next time I saw Bob, at a film convention in which he was a guest, he called me out of the audience during his speech to present me a copy of a unique Milt Gross drawing he had received personally from the cartoonist. Craig, that was a moment I’ll never forget.

CRAIG: Love the Gross! How did this The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes book come about? How did you determine the BEST cartoons? How did you chose the people who wrote about these cartoons.

JERRY: I had previously done two books for Insight Editions, and they informed me that they had just acquired the publishing rights to Looney Tunes. They asked if I had any ideas for a book that could be done quickly, for a possible Christmas release (last year). I had done a book 15 years ago called THE 50 GREATEST CARTOONS and it was long out of print. I proposed we do a Looney Tunes variant of that book, but this time up it to a hundred titles (as I knew there were over 400 really good ones out of the 1001 Looney Tunes created between 1930 and 1969). Warner Bros. agreed with my idea and off we went. This time, with the internet, my job was a lot easier.

I polled my readers on Cartoon Brew and spread the word throughout the blogosphere. I asked everyone to list their top ten Looney Tunes favorites – not historically important, or significant because it was the first of this or that – I was interested in the cartoons that were the funniest, the ones that were undeniably great in an art and entertainment way. I contacted a round table of friends and experts – animators, film critics, animation historians, etc. – to submit their choices and then asked those colleagues if they would write about one or two of their favorites. Everyone was happy to cooperate and in retrospect, it was one of the easiest, quickest book projects I’ve ever been involved with. The whole thing is just a love letter to the classic cartoons – and everyone wanted to sign their name to it.

CRAIG: Lightning round…rapid fire quick questions, with quick answers, Jerry, ready?
..OK, Favorite comic books?

JERRY: Mort Wesinger Superman Family titles (1958-1966), Stan Lee Marvel Comics (1961-1969), Harvey Comics (1952-1964), DC Funny Animals (1944-1965). If I had to pick one title: Jimmy Olsen #72.





CRAIG:..Ha Ha! I love the wonkiness of those Jimmy Olsen comics, too! Jerry, which cartoon character  is most like you?

JERRY: I think I’m Bugs Bunny, but in reality I’m more like Porky…

CRAIG: PORKY PIG?!?! Son of a bbb-, son of a bbb-, son of a bbb-… gun! Next qustion, the one treasured collectable you’d rescue in a fire?

JERRY: Tough one… my autographed Bob Clampett Cecil cel…?

CRAIG: …Sounds good…what’s better than cartoons?

JERRY: Ruling out SEX from the choices, there’s nothing better than cartoons but The Three Stooges are a close second…

CRAIG:…Nyuk! Nyuk! …Dead animator you hope is cryogenically frozen that you could thaw out and interview.

JERRY:Jim Tyer (of Terrytoons)

CRAIG: >WHEW< , those lightning rounds go so fast, >PANT< , >PANT<…’m out of breath… So, Jerry, you are a busy man, it’s hard to keep up with all your exciting and important projects. Besides ITCH readers absolutely without a doubt getting this sensational book what else should we be sure not to miss that you’re doing now or going to be doing in the future?


JERRY: Right now, I’m working on some exciting future DVD releases with several companies, including Warner Home Video and Shout Factory. If you are ever in L.A. please attend my monthly classic cartoon screenings at the CineFamily/Silent Movie Theatre in the Melrose/Fairfax area or attend my live comedy/worst cartoons show CARTOON DUMP at the Steve Allen Theatre in Hollywood. And of course I’m posting each day on Cartoon Brew.

CRAIG: Thank Jerry, I LOVE this terrific book, The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes Cartoons, and I’m sure each ITCH reader will, too. All’s they have to do is click on the cover below to order one, and I do mean to say, that’s all folks!





Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)


Monday, June 28, 2010

Thomas Onwhyn’s Royal Sea Side Albums, 1860

In 1860 Britain, artist Thomas Onwhyn published in small fold-out albums, comic postcards of a family’s summer trip to the beach. Beach vacations were still a relatively new concept at this time. Many people eased their way out into the strange, exotic waves, with the aid of wagons, and workers, who helped people down into the frightening open ocean water, and watched over them so they were safe. In one of the below pictures, we see that “Mama is so venturesome!”, for having gone just slightly further out from shore.   

Onwhyn’s The Queen’s Album of Sea Side and The Prince’s Album of Seaside, had no actual association with the Royal Family. Both contained the exact same set of images. Those pictures below which have a red border, were scanned from the Queen’s Album; those with the brown borders were scanned from the Prince’s Album. Enjoy!

Click on any picture, to see an enlarged version.

Doug Wheeler

SummerVacation

Doug
Doug

Monday, June 28, 2010

Makin’ Links # 221

Roasted Peanuts is a site that comments on various Charles Schulz Peanuts strips. May not sound like much but comments range from pithy to philosophical to insightful to hilarious…much like the strip itself.

http://peanutsroasted.blogspot.com/

Grantbridge Street shares a whole bunch of single page pinups by Jack Kirby depicting various early Fantastic Four villains. I believe these originally appeared in an Annual issue.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2010/06/gallery-of-fantastic-fours-most-famous.html

Over at Bronze Age Babies, the titular reviewers tackle what is arguably the seminal Bronze Age book–Giant Size X-Men # 1! A definite sleeper book on its original release, Marvel had long underestimated the fans’ desire to see more of the X-Men after the original series had been relegated to reprints. Then…this.

http://bronzeagebabies.blogspot.com/2010/06/giant-size-june-g-s-x-men-1.html

Finally today, here’s Rich Buckler with the latest chapter of his career story, this one dealing with his time at DC working mainly with Vince Colletta during the late seventies. Fascinating stuff.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2010/06/from-desk-of-rich-buckler-part-vi-dc.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Sunday, June 27, 2010

The Career of John Silverthorne — Banker, Part 1: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 50

Already having one Wall Street serialization going, it’s time to begin posting yet a second series! This has nothing to do with the fact that I’ve entrapped myself by saying that I would post banking/stock market-related cartoons daily, until Congress passed the latest Wall Street Reform legislation. No. No. Nothing at all to do with that… 

Today, we present Part 1 of The Career of John Silverthorne — Banker, by Trevor Michael Grover. Grover was himself a banker, beginning work at the Canadian Bank of Commerce on April 17th, 1913. While there, he produced a series of drawings about the fictional John Silverthorne – Banker, which appeared in the Toronto publication, Saturday Night. These were collected in 1914 by Canadian Art Publishers, into the book whose cover you see below. On January 25th, 1916, Grover enlisted in WW I, serving in the 166th Canadian Battalion and the 11th Infantry Brigade, during which he produced sketches from the Front, which were published in the Canadian Courier. This information is from the Canadian Bank of Commerce book, Letters from the Front, Being a record of the part played by officers of the Bank in the great war, 1914-1919 (Volume 2). Beyond that point, I’ve found no record of Trevor Grover’s activities. We will hope he returned from the War, and led a happy banking life.

So. let’s begin! Here’s Part 1, of The Career of John Silverthorne — Banker:

Click on any picture, to see an enlarged version.

Part Two will appear within the coming week.

Click here to find both the prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, while the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, on which I already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

Doug
Doug

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Short Selling, 1930s-style: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 49

Below, a cartoon by Daniel Bishop of the St. Louis Star, depicting “New York Stock Exchange”, with his crazy ugly wife “Short Selling”, and their club-armed brat kid “Bear Stories”.  This cartoon was reprinted in the April 1932 issue of American Review of Reviews, as an illustration of the wrong-headedness of those denouncing the practice of short selling, in accompaniment to a pro-Wall Street, pro-Short Selling article titled SHORT SELLING: Its Function in a Free Market, by C.T. Revere. At this point in the first Great Depression, American Review of Reviews was pro-Herbert Hoover, pro-Republican/Business Laissez-Faire. The majority of the cartoons it showed from the 1929 Stock Crash up thru 1932, were about how Herbert Hoover was always (for more than two years running) just on the verge of turning things around. Or, how the Depression was the fault of “Gloomy Gus” businesses who should stop thinking negatively and get up and start producing. Or, how the worsening economic crisis was the fault of consumers, for hanging on to their savings instead of spending.

For the 1932 Presidential Election Year, when you would have thought most cartoons would be focused on the economy and unemployment, the ones that American Review of Reviews chose to show most often to its readers, instead involved the split between “Dry” versus “Wet” politics (i.e., not the economy, but, division within the Republican Party between those wishing to dump support of  Prohibition, and those who insisted it was an essential position of their base).

One year later however — 1933 — even the still conservative American Review of Reviews turned against the excesses/ruin caused by short sellers, running an article against the practice, with the below cartoon by an unidentified Brooklyn Times cartoonist, illustrating the point.

Unfortunately, we are now experiencing the results of the answer to the question posed by the above cartoon.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, when I’d already planned other material).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

Doug
Doug

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