Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » April
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for April, 2010

Friday, April 30, 2010

Caricature vs. The Corporation # 03: The South Sea Scheme

In the early 1720s, William Hogarth created a print based on an early 18th-century episode of financial speculation and collapse.

As part of his description of the print in Hogarth’s Graphic Works, Ronald Paulson wrote:

"All classes became addicted to speculation, not only in the South Sea monopoly but also in a throng of parasite companies, some devoted to such practices as discovering the secret of perpetual motion, or extracting oil from radishes or butter from beechnuts … The bubble had burst by the end of August 1720, and ancestral estates and life savings alike disappeared."

The print, titled The South Sea Scheme, shows a chaotic London street scene. On the right, the pedestal bears the inscription "THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED IN MEMORY OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THIS CITY BY THE SOUTH SEA IN 1720."

The South Sea Scheme by William Hogarth

The South Sea Scheme by William Hogarth

April 1721, Copper-plate engraving
10 1/2″h x 12 1/2″w

Inscription at the bottom of the print:

See here ye Causes why in London,
So many Men are made, & undone,
That Arts, & honest Trading drop,
To Swarm about ye Devils shop, (A)
Who Cuts out (B) Fortunes Golden Haunches,

Trapping their Souls with Lotts and Chances,
Shareing em from Blue Garters down
To all Blue Aprons in the Town.
Here all Religions flock together,
Like Tame and Wild Fowl of a Feather,

Leaving their strife Religious bustle,
Kneel down to play at pitch and Hussle; (C)
Thus when the Sheepherds are at play,
Their flocks must surely go Astray;
The woeful Cause yt in these Times

(E) Honour, & (D) honesty, are Crimes,
That publickly are punish’d by
(G) Self Interest, and (F) Vilany;
So much for monys magick power
Guess at the Rest you find out more.

The South Sea Scheme details 1 and 2

The South Sea Scheme details 3 and 4

"So much for monys magick power …"

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com financial reform

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Friday, April 30, 2010

Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 04: “Mr. Fabulous’s Stock Experience”

Above, a parody bank note from the October 31, 1857 issue of The Picayune, listing Stocks amongst the worthless junk backing the note (and, issued by Pawnbrokers).

Below, Mr. Fabulous’s Stock Experience, from the circa 1850s-1860s booklet,  The Illustrated Scrap-Book of Humor and Intelligence, published by John D. Dyer & Co., Boston. Unfortunately, unlike Goldman Sachs’ self-described investment trader “Fabulous Fab” Fabrice Tourre, the Mr. Fabulous in this tale is the victim, rather than a villain.  

Click on any picture, to see an enlarged version.

Finally, we have See-Saw in Wall-Street, by Frank Bellew, from the September 12, 1857 issue of The Picayune.

Click here to find both the prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, while the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, on which I already had other material planned).

Series Refrain: Bank frauds and Wall Street swindles, resulting in economic ruin for everyone else, were regular and frequent occurrences prior to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s institution of laws designed to prevent further Great Depressions. These regulations worked until, starting in the 1980s, conservatives began dismantling those protections, stating that we’d be better off with an unfettered and unregulated market, free to do whatever it wants. Wall Street firms swore at that time, that they’d learned the lessons of the Great Depression, and could be trusted to not engage in dangerous practices.

Bull****!

If there is one lesson from the various economic collapses throughout history, it’s that human greed is eternal. There will always be selfish fools, who grab for themselves without care for the damage they inflict on others.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

BellewSr

Doug
Doug

Friday, April 30, 2010

Makin’ Links # 181

The first story I turned to in Craig’s new book, The Golden Treasury of Klassic Krazy Kool Kid’s Komics, was the one by children’s book illustrator Syd Hoff, who I did not know had started out as a cartoonist. You can order Craig’s book right up there in the upper left hand corner of this very page. Then check out this wonderful tribute site to Syd Hoff that’s run by his niece!

http://www.sydhoff.org/

A couple of little-seen but ahead of their time art-wise Gene Colan stories from pre-hero Marvel are on display at the Fabuleous Fifties this morning as all of his fans continue to send best wishes to Gene after a number of recent troubles.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2010/04/door-is-always-open-friday-comic-book.htm

Here’s an all too brief sequence of Alley Oop from my own childhood in 1964. Oop was an early favorite of mine that I’ve rediscovered and come to appreciate even more in recent years.

http://hairygreeneyeball2.blogspot.com/2010/04/cleopatras-hair.html

Legendary Chilean renaissance man Alejandro Jodorowsky presented a series of surreal, underground-style Spanish-language comics in the mid-sixties, many of which can be found here:

http://fabulaspanicas.blogspot.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 03: The Financial Crisis of Fall 1857

Both of today’s pictures come from The Picayune, editted and largely drawn by artist Frank Bellew. Their topics involve the financial crisis of Fall 1857.  Below, from October 3, 1857, expresses the general feeling about Wall Street brokers following the collapse. This demonstrates how Wall Street throughout its history, and through its own selfish actions, has repeatedly lost the people’s trust. Whatever promises given today, if not legally binding, Wall Street will break tomorrow.

Click on any picture, to see an enlarged version.

Next, The Devil to Pay in Wall Street by Frank Bellew, at the start of the crisis. Published on September 5, 1857.

Click here to find both the prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, while the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, on which I already had other material planned).

Series Refrain: Bank frauds and Wall Street swindles, resulting in economic ruin for everyone else, were regular and frequent occurrences prior to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s institution of laws designed to prevent further Great Depressions. These regulations worked until, starting in the 1980s, conservatives began dismantling those protections, stating that we’d be better off with an unfettered and unregulated market, free to do whatever it wants. Wall Street firms swore at that time, that they’d learned the lessons of the Great Depression, and could be trusted to not engage in dangerous practices.

Bull****!

If there is one lesson from the various economic collapses throughout history, it’s that human greed is eternal. There will always be selfish fools, who grab for themselves without care for the damage they inflict on others.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

BellewSr

NYPicayune

Doug
Doug

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Preservation and Celebration: The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

Professor and author Lucy Shelton Caswell has the distinct privilege of curating the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum.  The legend of the museum is well-known: in 1977 the Milton Caniff collection was donated to Ohio State University, and Caswell accepted responsibility for the treasure.  One donation led to another, and the collection of Ohio State University snowballed into one of the most significant research collections of cartoon art in the United States.

With the tenth triennial Festival of Cartoon Art scheduled for this October, and a forthcoming book series, these are happy and heady times for the flourishing Museum.  It is an unusual story of growth in a nation suffering drastic academic budget cuts, job loss, and anxiety.  We have to regard it as a beacon of hope.

Caswell took a moment from her busy labors to share a couple of favorite images with ITCH.

ITCH: When I think of your work as curator since 1977, the word that comes to mind is “discovery.”  Each box, each file, each portfolio, must come with the same kind of excitement for you: what will I find?  Do you have items in the collection that are special prizes because of the work involved in finding or preserving them?

Caswell: The best “Antiques Road Show moment” was the Tales of the Jungle Imps experience.

http://cartoons.osu.edu/?q=press/tale-jungle-imps

A Tale of the Jungle Imps by Winsor McCay.  1903-06-28  original cartoon

What are some of the oldest political cartoons in the collection, and what can we learn from them?

The oldest political cartoons in the collection are British prints, which teach us how fortunate we are as American citizens that our tradition of making pictures to criticize politicians is based on the British model [where this was tolerated] instead of the Continental [where censorship was enforced].

James Gillray

Title: A Great Stream from a Petty Fountain; – or – John Bull Swamped in the Flood of New-Taxes: – Cormorants Fishing in the Stream

Date: 1806-05-09 [We do have work that is older than this, but digital images are not available at this time.]  Hand-colored engraving.

Do you have a favorite “old-time” cartoonist?
Billy Ireland

http://cartoons.osu.edu/?q=content/faq#billyireland

Note to readers: follow this link, and watch a video of Lucy Shelton Caswell discussing her book about Billy Ireland!

beth
beth

Thursday, April 29, 2010

The Unauthorized Krazy + Ignatz “Tiger Tea” Addendum # 8: July 25, 1936

Today’s episode:

Krazy Kat, July 25, 1936

Krazy Kat – Vacation Time is Here! by George Herriman

The Nashville Tennessean, July 25, 1936

The Tiger Tea series was George Herriman’s longest-running Krazy Kat saga. Over the course of a year, the residents of Coconino County wrestled with the comical repercussions of a mysterious tea with hallucinogenic powers. As far as I know, this series has never been reprinted in its entirety.

Nearly 100 large reproductions of Tiger Tea daily strips are available in George Herriman’s Krazy + Ignatz in "Tiger Tea," a beautifully designed collection by Yoe Books. It’s available through Amazon.com and fine bookstores everywhere.

in an effort to make more of these classics available, this Unauthorized Addendum presents some of the comic strips from the Tiger Tea series that didn’t make it into the printed collection. Click here to see more posts in this series.

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Caricature vs. the Corporation # 02: Wall Street & Financial Reform

One hundred years from now, will there still be new cartoons about bank failures? Or about unemployment rates doubling across the country while financial firms triple their profits and pay their executives $20 billion in bonuses? How about a Congressional "debate" on financial reform regulation after Wall Street institutions and allied special-interest groups have spent tens of millions of dollars trying to disrupt the process?

In the early 1880s, Puck Magazine ran a series of cartoons that argued the case for financial reform from a variety of angles. Here are a couple examples with descriptions that appeared with the prints at the time of publication.

Getting Ahead of the Banks by Frederick Opper

Getting Ahead of the Banks by Frederick Opper

Puck Magazine Cover , November 30, 1881

"Recent events have shown that a bank is about the most dangerous place to keep one’s money in, and the time may come when nobody will ever dream of depositing it there for safety, and there will be a return to first principles, by using the old fashioned stocking or burying the gold in its original mother earth. In this way, no speculating cashier or enterprising morocco firm can have the opportunity of using your money for their own private purposes, and one is not likely to find posted on the door of the establishment, "Closed in consequence of the last embezzlement by the teller and president."

"We Americans pride ourselves on being a very smart, when we are in reality the most easily imposed upon and most credulous, people in the world. Although on an average a bank collapses in some part of the country in every day of the week, we still fatuously continue to put our trust in them.

"We doubt if we are very far wide of the mark in stating that probably fifty per cent of the banks throughout the Union which at present are considered sound are irretrievably rotten, chiefly owing to the directors and cashiers having spent the money of the depositors. It has become the custom now, and it is the custom more honored in the observance than the breach. Unless a man can secure a position as president, cashier or teller, or obtain special favors, we certainly would not advise him to have anything to do with a bank, always excepting the fact of his being in the burglary business."

H,C. Bunner, from the description at the front of the issue

The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street by Joseph Keppler

The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street by Joseph Keppler

Puck Magazine Centerspread , August 30, 1882

"In some remote valleys and swamps of India, and in some partially explored districts of several Asiatic islands, which abound with rank vegetation and are the home of slimy reptiles and fierce wild beasts, the Upas tree flourishes. It grows to perfection in the Island of Java, and its scientific name is antiaris toxicaria, but its poisonous qualities are quite as great in the English language as in Latin; English, therefore, will answer our purpose in this instance. Everybody has surely heard of the noxious Upas. It has been said that to even approach it was certain death … We, too, in this country have a Upas tree.

"The home of our Upas tree is in Wall Street, and it will be instantly recognized by a glance at our centre cartoon. There it stands, firmly planted and filling the surrounding atmosphere with its poison, and corrupting and killing everybody who approaches within range of its deadly qualities. There is but one tree that possesses these fatal properties; but this one has proved itself to be as dangerous among us as a whole forest of them elsewhere. Men with reputations have waded through the sluggish stream which surrounds it to pluck the golden fruit which hangs in such profusion from its branches, only to die politically, financially and morally, while the tree still holds out its tempting products, inviting more misguided men to the slaughter.

The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street (detail) by Joseph Keppler

"What wrecks of character lie scattered around its slimy trunk! Here may we see the skull of the once famous Jim Fisk, one of our Wall Street Upas tree’s earliest victims. An intelligent, though time-serving editor is the next in the toils … Near him is the festering corpse of a corrupt judge. Further on is a general of great ability and of whom we have already a bad record of two Presidential terms and an attempt at a third, reposing near a poor widow and ruined stockholder. In every direction shattered homes, ruined property, death and destruction are visible.

The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street (detail) by Joseph Keppler

"… But the tree is in fine condition. It will probably stand there for a long time to come, spreading abroad throughout the land, and other trees will grow up from its seeds and parasites. Our deadly Upas tree will continue to yield its fruit, corrupting judges, corrupting editors, corrupting Legislatures, corrupting Congress, corrupting everybody … "

H,C. Bunner, from the description at the front of the issue

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com financial reform

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 02: C.M. Coolidge’s circa 1880s “Playing Bank President”

The following series of circa 1880s trade cards, attributed to artist C.M. Coolidge (famous for his painting of dogs playing poker), depicts a child Playing Bank President according to the examples of his day. How it differs from today, is its lack of a Congressional Grilling, and in its final panel showing the pretend Bank President in jail — unfortunately just a fantasy for us – which  Goldman Sachs’ employees showed in their testimony yesterday would be well deserved.

Series Refrain: Bank frauds and Wall Street swindles, resulting in economic ruin for everyone else, were regular and frequent occurrences prior to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s institution of laws designed to prevent further Great Depressions. These regulations worked until, starting in the 1980s, conservatives began dismantling those protections, stating that we’d be better off with an unfettered and unregulated market, free to do whatever it wants. Wall Street firms swore at that time, that they’d learned the lessons of the Great Depression, and could be trusted to not engage in dangerous practices.

Bull****!

If there is one lesson from the various economic collapses throughout history, it’s that human greed is eternal. There will always be selfish fools, who grab for themselves without care for the damage they inflict on others.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Makin’ Links # 180

For reasons we won’t go into, Welcome to the Witches Coven, a rather explicit–and with the benefit of hindsight obviously heavily photo-referenced–Don McGregor/Luis Garcia tale from the very first issue of Vampirella fourteen year old me ever bought in the 1970′s, was always a favorite.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2010/04/welcome-to-witches-coven-by-don.html

One of the great names in early comics fandom, Bhob Stewart, over at his Potrzebie blog,  shares a rare selection of Wally Wood illustrations from the artist’s 1960′s proposal for an animated cartoon series, Fearless Ferris and the Misfits!

http://potrzebie.blogspot.com/2010/04/wood-chips-17-fearless-ferris.html

Finally today, here’s a bunch of silly Don Martin stuff from the short-lived Don Martin Magazine that followed all of the artist’s years as one of the Usual Gang of Idiots at Mad.

http://hairygreeneyeball2.blogspot.com/2010/04/mads-maddest.html

BoOkStEvE!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

IT’S WACKY WONDER WOMAN WEDNESDAY!

Thumbs up for this Wacky Wonder Woman!

pretty

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

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