Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » February
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for February, 2010

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Makin’ Links # 135

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FF008_07

Here’s a great French blog with marvelous, good-sized works by comics and magazine illustrators from around the world including Mort Kunstler, Sanjulian , Dave Stevens and Esteban Maroto.

http://illustrateurs.blogspot.com/

Here’s a one-off tale of the great Gilbert Shelton superhero parody character Wonder Warthog, done with fellow underground artists Robert Williams and S. Clay Wilson for Zam, the 1974 Zap jam special.

http://lovetheline.blogspot.com/2010/02/blog-post_20.html

Lee and Kirby’s seminal Fantastic Four number eight featuring the first appearances of the Puppet Master and his daughter Alicia turns up as a natural part of Ten Cent Dreams‘ puppets theme week today.

http://tencentdreams.blogspot.com/2010/02/lee-kirby-saturday-matinee-puppets-week.html

Finally today, there have inexplicably been a couple of requests this week to know more about me. Well, here, from 1992, is my interview as it appeared in David Anthony Kraft’s Comics Interview. I realize that was 18 years ago now but other than getting my first computer in 1994, son bookdave coming along in 1996 and me losing a lot of hair, not much has changed since then. So for those of you who are curious, enjoy.

http://booksteveslibrary.blogspot.com/2010/02/comics-interview-and-me.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, February 26, 2010

A Very Fine+ Statue!

The joke headline above is courtesy of Dave Scroggy of Dark Horse. Yoe! Studio sculpted this statue, which belongs to a series of 6 syrocos “The Simpsons Classic Characters,” for Dave. There were only 550 made. And as funny man Dave says, “Buy this from a guy that looks just like the statue at a comic book store near you!”

 

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Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Friday, February 26, 2010

Makin’ Links # 134

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01NewAdventuresOfBatman&Robin_1949_100

Just how convoluted is modern comics continuity? Try to make some sense out of this special Mother’s Day list (?? Don’t look at me. It’s dated yesterday) of the Ten Best and Worst Mothers in comics.

http://www.technewsdaily.com/10-best-and-worst-mothers-in-comics-0248/

Thomas Haller Buchanan offers a brief but nicely illustrated reminiscence of the 1940′s Batman serials, the 15 segment chapterplays (something they don’t have anymore) that one could catch weekly at your local neighborhood theater (something else they don’t have anymore).

http://mydelineatedlife.blogspot.com/2010/02/serial-batman-1.html

http://mydelineatedlife.blogspot.com/2010/02/serial-batman-2.html

Speaking of Mr. Buchanan, his Whirled of Kelly blog has been taking a look at one of the minor Okefenokee Players in Walt Kelly’s Pogo in recent days, the perpetually one week old bunny, L’l Awry.

http://whirledofkelly.blogspot.com/search/label/Li%27l%27%20Awry

What’s that? You want some comic book stories? Well, here’s a ton of Treasure Chest reprints with art by the great Reed Crandall courtesy of Mr Door Tree. Unless you had a Catholic childhood in the fifties and sixties, you probably never saw these except in junk shops with old comics for a nickel each. Another something else they don’t have anymore. Sigh.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/02/reed-crandall-1917-1982-treasure-chest.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Sugar Sugar!

Sweet! The Art of Archie is one of the best exhibits of comic art I’ve ever had the privilege and pleasure of seeing is in its very last days at the terrific MoCCA museum. Certainly some of the finest artists to take up pen an ink for comics have been part of the Archie stable, and this exhibit beautifully showcases their work. On the walls you’ll find choice art by Bob Montana, Archie’s incredible first artist; Dan DeCarlo, who deftly defined the characters for the modern age; Harry Lucey, one of the great storytellers in comics; Stan Goldberg; Joe Edwards; and more.

In this exhibits, there are treasures like DeCarlo’s recreation of the first Archie cover; an unpublished Cold War story; and the art for a comic story when the Archie characters visited MoCCA with Ellen Abramowitz and Karl Erickson, who head up the museum, as part of the tale!

MoCCA even offered a printed guide to the exhibit, which identified the artist of each piece of art in the exhibit. The guide was a great keepsake to take home.

Few weeks later, I went back to take more in when FIFTY YEAR Archie veteran, the amazing Archie editor Victor Gorelick spoke about his work. I’m planning to go back once more tonight at 7:00 pm, when Jim Salicrup interviews a bunch of Archie writers (due to weather conditions please call to confirm at 212-254-3511). It will be fascinating. See you there!

Archie-Royal-Portrait-Web

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Makin’ Links # 133

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SECRET LOVE 03005

In working with Craig on his book, The Great Anti-War Cartoons, I developed a fascination with great caricaturists. Now comes the site,Great Caricatures, offering up histories and galleries on such as Thomas Nast, André Gill and the highly influential artist, Honoré Daumier. Perhaps best of all, The showrunner of that site, David Donihue, is now a member of I.T.C.H. and will be contributing here on a regular basis!

http://GreatCaricatures.com/

The Collectors Weekly is a site that deals with all types of collecting. Recently they ran this informative state-of-the hobby interview with Greg Theakston—illustrator/publisher/fan/historian/Kirby Collaborator and inventor of “Theakstonizing,” a process which has allowed for more and more classic reprints to be done in recent years.

http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/an-interview-with-golden-age-comics-collector-and-historian-greg-theakston/

Magic Carpet Burn offers the first part of DC’s Teen Titans # 3—an even in 1966 somewhat outdated tale of hot-rodders, surfers and fifties-style high school foolishness that served as my own personal introduction to the Titans (except Robin), the art of Nick Cardy, the un-hip hipness of Bob Haney’s scripting and even Ed “Big Daddy” Roth who is thinly disguised as the villain here! Check back for part two!

http://magiccarpetburn.blogspot.com/2010/02/teen-titans-3-revolt-at-harrison-high.html

Finally today, a nearly forgotten—forgotten because it was buried in an issue of DC’s early seventies title The Sinister House of Secret Love which none of us fanboys would have touched with a ten foot pole at the time—32 page (!) art extravaganza by Alex Toth at his best, inks by Frank Giacoa and script by Frank Robbins.

http://kb-outofthisworld.blogspot.com/2010/02/women-running-from-houses-on-comic-book.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Very Pretty! Trina Robbins and Nell Brinkley

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Fantagraphics’ The Brinkley Girls: The Best of Nell Brinkley’s Cartoons From 1913-1940 is seductive and spell-binding, a siren call of exploding color and really, really pretty girls.  I know, because my copy was stolen before I paid for it.  A woman stalked me in the bookstore and took it as soon as I set it down to hide in the bathroom.  Comics artist and ground-breaking herstorian Trina Robbins, editor of this phenomenal collection, took a few moments to explain to I.T.C.H. how these gorgeous women of style came to life on Hearst’s pages for almost 30 years.

I.T.C.H.: When did you first encounter Nell Brinkley?

Trina Robbins: The first Brinkley pages I ever saw were very kindly given to me by Bill Blackbeard, and though they obviously were very beautiful, I saw them out of context, so I didn’t “get it.”  If you see Nell out of context, all you see is beautiful art, but the writing that goes with it is necessary in order to really understand what she was doing.  Then, when cat yronwode and I co-wrote the first book on women in comics, Women and the Comics, I still had very little to go on about Nell.  The biggest piece of information I had came from a Los Angeles group of illustration fans, and that information later turned out to be absolutely faulty!

 

 

The Brinkley Girls from Fantagraphics

 

I.T.C.H.: What kind of a woman was she?

TR: The research I’ve done uncovers a woman whose outlook was as romantic as her writings.  She seems to have been sheltered quite a bit from harsh reality by her mother, who managed everything for her.  At the same time, she handled her extreme deadlines very well, and seems to have been politically aware.  For instance, she was passionately angry about the mistreatment of the WWI vets during the Depression, and she also often expressed her admiration of Eleanor Roosevelt in her daily panels.

 

 

Pretty Girls

 

I.T.C.H.: Can you tell us a little about her working conditions?

TR: Nell had a carriage house behind her New Rochelle, NY, house, which she turned into a studio.  From there she turned out her daily panels and Sunday pages, and often also her movie or stage reviews–a LOT of work!  In order to meet her deadlines, she had worked out a system: as soon as she finished a page, she would roll it up and give it to her chauffeur, who would drive it to the train station in time to meet the train to NY.  He would pass the art to the conductor through the train window, and when the train arrived at Grand Central station, there’d be a man from the Hearst syndicate waiting for it, to take it to the Hearst offices by deadline.

 

 

Golden Eyes

 

I.T.C.H.: How was her work received in her lifetime?

TR: Nell was a superstar!  She had at least 3 popular songs written about her and her “Brinkley Girls,” when she traveled, newspaper reporters would be at the train station or later at her hotel room to interview her about how she liked their city, although usually the questions were simple stuff like “How do you like San Francisco girls,” to which she would of course answer, “They’re very pretty.”  People, especially young women, collected and cut out her art and pasted it into scrapbooks, and little girls would cut out and color her black and white daily pages.  Her fans, mostly female, also copied her art, and an obituary about her said that she had more copyists than any other artist except Charles Dana Gibson.

 

 

Fortunes of Flossie

 

I.T.C.H.: If you wanted readers to know one thing about Nell Brinkley, what would it be?

T-R: Nell drew “like a girl.”  My experience and research has shown me that for the most part contemporary male comics historians, scholars, and “experts” interpret pretty art as code for unimportant, trivial, “female.”  The world of comics criticism needs to open up to a non male-centric way of looking at comic art, and I think that will only happen when more women enter into that world.

beth
beth

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Makin’ Links # 132

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Herc Brazil 6

Billy Graham—the late African-American comics artist, not the famous evengelist—became known for his unique style on Marvel’s LUKE CAGE strip in the early 1970’s but that style was already on display a few year’s earlier in this self-penned story from a 1970 issue of Warren’s EERIE.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2010/02/black-and-white-wednesday-billy-grahams.html

Joe Bloke showcases a handful of lovely fashion pages originally done as filler for DC romance comics of the seventies and featuring work by Ric Estrada, Tony DeZuniga and the great Jay Scott Pike (DOLPHIN).

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2010/02/mad-mad-modes-for-moderns.html

Rip Jagger continues his “All Things Charlton Comics” approach to blogging with a look at some intriguing Brazilian comic book covers featuring Sam Glanzman’s long-running version of Hercules.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2010/02/hercules-gets-brazilian.html

Finally today, John Glenn Taylor shares a devastating CRAZY Magazine satire of everyone’s favorite l’il blue guys, the Smurfs, written by that magazines mainstay writer Stu Schwartzburg and drawn by the great Marie Severin in a very different style for her.

http://johnglenntaylor.blogspot.com/2010/02/something-smurphy-this-way-comes.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

IT’S WACKY WONDER WOMAN WEDNESDAY!

Wacky Wonder Woman, on her way to save the world, pauses for the paparazzi!

 

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Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

ITCH Hits A New Low!

Minnie Never Looked Like This!!

When Craig Yoe first approached me about joining the exalted ranks of The I.T.C.H. Blog posters, I humbly demurred. How could my merely human level of wit and insight possibly match that of Yoe’s? Still, he insisted he wanted me to contribute content, so I figured some agency was pressuring him to hire a minority (I’m of Dutch descent). Not wanting to get my old friend in Dutch with the authorities (any more than he can do on his own), I agreed to join. So I’ll be alienating Craig’s hard-won readership on a weekly basis.

I’ve been mulling over the topic of my first post for some time. Should I write a manifesto on what I believe makes comics special? If any of you read the magazine I publish, Hogan’s Alley, you are already largely familiar with my perspective on cartooning and its place in the larger culture. Besides, it sounds kind of pretentious, and my appreciation of cartooning is anything but. So I just thought I’d share with you some fun work I was looking at recently.

Like many comics fans, my gateway to an obsession with comics was the Disney line. When I first started reading them, I didn’t know about bylines or bullpens–just the stories. And it wasn’t until years later that I learned that many of the Disney stories I enjoyed were done by Paul Murry. Eventually, fellow fan (and occasional Hogan’s Alley writer) Germund von Wowern, filled in even more of the gaps in my knowledge of Murry’s impressive and prolific career. And imagine my delight when Germund revealed that Murry was a first-rate good girl artist!

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I became acquainted with Murry through his depictions of Goofy, Mickey Mouse, Jose Carioca, and many other regulars of the Disney universe. But Murry was far more than a funny-animal cartoonist; his depictions of women might come across today as sexist relics from a less enlightened era, but DAMN he was good. (I’ve included a sampling here; if you’re at work, make sure you’re reading this while no coworkers are nearby.) Many thanks to Germund for sharing these with me so that I could share them with you years later.

08-Florence

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10-inkswimsuits

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And I guess that this nonlinear connection between my early love for comics and my continuing discoveries as I and others peer into every nook and cranny that our art form contains is what makes cartooning research so exciting for me: I will never know as much as I want to, and each discovery–whether my own or that of someone else–makes me want to know more (and hence the image I present at the end of my post). I look forward to continuing this journey with you here at The I.T.C.H. Blog and, if you’re so inclined, in the pages of Hogan’s Alley.

–Tom Heintjes
Publisher, Hogan’s Alley

Tom
Tom

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: James Thurber in the Garden

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Here’s a refreshing departure from our usual Tuesday fare (at least that’s what I’m calling it). Instead of an obscure rock ‘n’ roll record about a popular superhero, I’m presenting an odd spoken-word piece by a writer/cartoonist. So sue me.

 If you’re reading this blog, the name James Thurber should be familiar to you already. And if it isn’t, go look it up. What am I, your mother? 

Peggy Cass & James Thurber & Joan Anderson

 One of my favorite short-short stories by Thurber is “The Unicorn in the Garden.” The title pretty much says it all. 

unicorn

 The story was part of a Broadway show adapted from Thurber’s works called “A Thurber Carnival” which was recorded for an original cast album. “Unicorn…” was also turned into an animated cartoon by UPA. And now you have a chance to hear it. Isn’t that special? Click the link below and see if you recognize the voices of Alice Ghostley and John McGiver.

The Unicorn In The Garden – A Thurber Carnival

David B
DJ David B.

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