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Friday, November 30, 2012

Cartoons Magazine Centennial’s Post-Election 1912

Finally, finally, we’ve reached the Closing Out, of the Closing Out, of the 1912 Election! (It’s only taken me, like, a hundred years.) As a reprinter of the prior months’ editorial cartoons, Cartoons Magazine‘s November Election follow-up, naturally appeared in its December (mostly) & January (some) issues. In this post, the page is from the December issue, unless I specify it appeared in the January 1913 issue.

Above, After the Votes Were Counted, by artist A.D. Condo (creator of The Outbursts of Everett True), depicting a despondent President William Howard Taft, and a collapsed G.O.P., at their third place finish. (I have no idea what or who “C.P.” stands for.)

Click on the above & below pages, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Below, Cartoons Magazine‘s commentary on how cartoonists covered the election. The December 1912 issue was the first to feature such a long prose piece, and there are several more in this issue, about or by cartoonists (we’ll show those in a later posting). Starting with this issue, prose articles became a regular element in the magazine.

Above, cartoonist Billy Ireland on the “Stand Pat”, no compromise attitude that Republicans took into the 1912 Election (inset cartoon, from pre-Election). And, the result of their taking such positions.

(Does the above in anyway sound familiar??…)

Below, additional election aftermath for the G.O.P., by John Scott Clubb and Ole May.

Above (jokingly), Robert La Follete “To the Rescue”, pictured by Gaar Williams.

Beneath, John DeMar on Woodrow Wilson‘s election (left), and, James H. Donahey, on the Republican Party looking for the return to their fold, of Teddy Roosevelt.

Another type of election loser, above, by Fontaine Fox, Hruska, and Burt Thomas.

Beneath, from the January 1913 issue, Bull Moose/Progressive Party financier George Perkins, shown the door, now that the Party has lost. Cartoons by Robert Carter, Gaar Williams, and Charles “Doc” Winner.

Above, “If we Had an Ex-Presidents Club”, by Donahey, Clubb, and Fox, featuring Taft & T.R.

Below, by William Charles Morris, from the January 1913 issue, university professor Woodrow Wilson, puts on a President’s Hat, while outgoing President Taft, tries on a Professor’s hat.

Above, Teddy Roosevelt’s Son-in-Law, Nicholas Longworth, pictured post-election by artist Oscar Cesare. Longworth had been a sitting Republican Congressman from Ohio, when his more famous father-in-law split the G.O.P. in two. Longworth stuck with the Republicans, which didn’t go down well with T.R.; plus he lost his seat in Congress (but would regain it in the next election).

Beneath (from January 1913, by Charles “Doc” Winner), one term President William Howard Taft, preparing to make his final address to Congress.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics W.A. Ireland


Doug

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2 Responses to “Cartoons Magazine Centennial’s Post-Election 1912”

  1. smurfswacker Says:

    I’m pretty sure “C.P.” in the first cartoon is the “Mr. Common People” mentioned in the first paragraph of the text piece. I’ve seen his costume, a plain suit with a derby hat and an umbrella, used in many humor cartoons to represent the average middle-class (as opposed to working-class) guy.

    I want to say how much I’ve enjoyed your postings about the 1912 election. Great artwork and fascinating historical insights. Thanks for all the work you put into this series.

  2. Doug Says:

    Hey, thanks for the comments! Glad to hear the up-to-the-century Election coverage was appreciated! And thanks for pointing out the “Mr. Common People” (I was thinking “Common Person”, but that didn’t sound right, so I left it as a question).

    Doug

I.T.C.H is looking forward to your thoughts. Please, no flame. Thanks!

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