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Sunday, November 11, 2012

Unemployed & Disabled WW I Veterans’ Pamphlets

Following W.W. I, both before & during the First Great Depression, unemployed & disabled veterans sold pamphlets on the street, as a means of asking for money while retaining their pride that they were not begging. Many of these pamphlets did not have a set price, but instead asked people to “Pay What You Please.” Most of the ones I am presenting today, however, do have prices on them (and substantially high prices for that time). Most of these also come from the early 1920′s. I’ve not really noticed the aligning of “priced” or “not priced”, with date published before this (and, adding to the difficulty of figuring such out, most such pamphlets are not dated). But, perhaps, the earliest veterans’ pamphlets had specific prices, while later ones dropped the price, certainly during the Depression, and likely earlier.

We’ve had numerous postings involving these postings (all of the images in this posting, are new). Click here to find these past postings.

Above, from 1921, the front cover of the third issue of Doughboys’ Fun and Facts In and Out of Service. Already, in 1921, we are seeing the call for “Bonus Legislation”, in reference to a verbally implied promise that servicemen would receive a bonus payment after the war, but it had not yet been given to them. Republican Administrations of 1920 thru 1932 refused to honor that promise, during which — especially with the 1929 Stock Market Crash — it became an increasingly vociferous issue. It was not until F.D.R. came into office, that payment was finally made.

Above, the front cover of one of an unknown many different, unnumbered, undated issues of My Buddie Boy Wit and Goodwill In and Out of Hospital. This one, again, is priced, while the majority of such issues (that I own, anyways), are not.

Beneath, by W.W. I soldier & artist Dan Napoli, Passing the Buck, from an interior page of issue five of Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine. (All of the interior page cartoons in this posting, by the way, come from that issue.)

Above, the front cover of the second issue of A.E.F. in France and at Home, from October, 1920. “A.E.F.” stands for American Expeditionary Forces. I.e., the American soldiers sent to Europe for W.W. I, some of which were at this point still there, post-War.

Beneath, the rear cover of this same issue, carried this ad for another pamphlet, The A.E.F. Fun in France, issue two. Art (for this cartoon) by Dick Kennedy.

Above & below, two more by Dan Napoli, from issue five of Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine.

More Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine. Above, the front cover of issue five, published in 1922. By Napoli.

Above & below, cartoons involving the “Bonus Payment” issue. In the above 1922 cartoon, France is shown willing to pay for its war debt to the U.S., in wine. A soldier is willing to take his still unpaid bonus in that wine. The bigger joke playing out here, is that in 1922, Prohibition was in effect, and wine (apart from what you got in church) outlawed.

Beneath, artist Tom Bell‘s cartoon on the rear cover of yet another issue of My Buddie Boy Wit and Goodwill In and Out of Hospital, illustrating what (to me, at least) appears to be some lawyer attempting to get servicemen to go through him for their still-as-yet-approved-by-congress Bonus Payment. (Pure guessing there — I could be wrong.)

Above, the front cover of an actual numbered issue (issue 4) of My Buddie Boy Wit and Goodwill In and Out of Hospital.

Below, another rear cover ad involving the Bonus Payment, this time with cartoon art by Doc Rankin. From Doughboys’ Fun and Facts In and Out of Service.

Above, a Doc Rankin strip, from Uncle Sam’s Regulars on the Rhine.

Below, the rear cover from that same issue. Poem by A.W. Bryce. Illustration by Carl Nassal.


Doug

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