Super I.T.C.H » Blog Archive » The Dollar or the Man # 1: Gentlemen, Let Me Introduce My Friend
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe
Thursday, October 28, 2010

The Dollar or the Man # 1: Gentlemen, Let Me Introduce My Friend

With less than a week to go before the 2010 mid-term elections, Republican Tea Party candidates are riding a wave of voter anger to successfully challenge political incumbents. The Tea Partiers dodge the media and offer sketchy details on what they will do if elected. They struggle to distance themselves from their previous public statements that support the privatization of Social Security, the elimination of Unions and the Federal minimum wage, as well as cutbacks in public education.

The success of their campaigns can be largely attributed to the support of the conservative media and anonymous unlimited corporate donations made possible by the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. The Tea Partiers’ small-government, pro-business agenda has become a useful tool of corporations attempting to protect record-breaking profits by opposing the possibility of government initiatives that could reduce or eliminate tax breaks, job outsourcing and predatory business practices. The Citizens United ruling made it legal for corporations to effectively purchase positions in the government by financing candidates willing to follow a corporate agenda. Using divisive, deceptive, fear-based and authoritarian political tactics, they threaten to turn back the clock to an earlier time like the late 1800s, when unfettered capitalism played a similar role in government elections.

In the 1890s, Homer Davenport was one of the most famous (and highly paid) political cartoonists in America. He covered the presidential elections of 1896 and 1900 for William Randolph Hearst’s New York Journal.

Homer Davenport

Homer Davenport
c. 1902

A collection of his work titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day was published in 1900. It includes 54 large reproductions of cartoons that originally appeared in the Journal . Their subject matter was government corruption and the abuse of corporate power.

The Dollar or the Man by Homer Davenport

The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day by Homer Davenport
Small, Maynard & Co., Boston
1900, 134 pgs; 66 plates, approx. 7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

Davenport created the Trust Figure to represent the monopolistic corporations of his time. The coal trust, sugar trust and meat trust were all depicted as bearded, hulking brutes that clubbed their competition and critics into submission.

Let Me Introduce My Friend by Homer Davenport

"Gentlemen, let me introduce my friend" by Homer Davenport

Plate XLIV from The Dollar or the Man, the Issue of To Day, 1900
7 1/2 "w x 10 1/4 "h

During the 1896 election, Davenport connected the Trust figures to Mark Hanna, a wealthy Ohio industrialist and shipping magnate who became chairman of the National Republican Committee. Davenport caricatured Hanna in a suit covered with dollar signs as a reference to the formidable fundraising skills that had earned Hanna the nickname, "Dollar Mark."

Photo of Mark Hanna and Caricature of Mark Hanna by Homer Davenport

As the campaign manager for Presidential candidate William McKinley, Hanna systemized fundraising from big business. He visited the leaders of large corporations and major banks who feared the populist rhetoric or McKinley’s opponent: William Jennings Bryan. Bryan represented the Populist Party which advocated public ownership of the railroads, steamship lines and telephone and telegraph systems.Hanna raised a record $3.5 million for the campaign – roughly $3 billion in today’s dollars. The Republicans spent five times more money than the Democrats in the 1896 campaign.

McKinley won the election and a second term in 1900. He protected the interests of big business and did little to alleviate the social problems caused by industrialization. By 1901, McKinley no longer supported the growth of big business. He recognized that trusts and monopolies hurt competition and kept prices high for the consumer. In September of 1901 McKinley was assassinated by a man who reportedly confessed: "I killed the President because he was the enemy of the good people – the good working people. I am not sorry for my crime."

Click here to read the next post in this series

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com | Tea Party | Trusts


David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

View the entire blog

4 Responses to “The Dollar or the Man # 1: Gentlemen, Let Me Introduce My Friend”

  1. Joshua Gamen Says:

    Love the comics, this is the stuff i’m all about!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWTAJRdtd_Y

  2. Super I.T.C.H » Blog Archive » The Dollar or the Man # 2: The Threat Before the Fight. The Forces of the Opposition Says:

    [...] Click here for the first post in this series [...]

  3. Gus Frederick Says:

    Excellent and timely series! Homer’s message rings as true today as it did 100 years ago. Thanks for keeping the memory of this outstanding artist alive!

    Gus Frederick
    Silverton, OR

  4. Super I.T.C.H » Blog Archive » Honor Among Thieves: The Dollar or the Man # 8 / Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons # 83 Says:

    [...] muggers, surrendering to what they recognize as bigger thieves — Wall Street financiers, plus Mark Hanna (far right, wearing pants checkered with $ signs). Ohio Senator, and Republican National Chairman, [...]

I.T.C.H is looking forward to your thoughts. Please, no flame. Thanks!

SUBSCRIBE