Super I.T.C.H » 2012 » February
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for February, 2012

Thursday, February 23, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Fat and Slat #1

It’s hard to imagine anyone with any interest in comic strips not knowing the name Ed Wheelan.  He was the cartoonist best known for the mostly uncollected  Minute Movies, a spoof of early movie melodramas complete with a repertory cast of pen and ink ‘actors’ .  Before it’s end in 1935 it had turned into a semi-serious feature with continued stories and while never what you’d call  a huge success it was obviously popular enough to inspire takeoffs. E.C. Segar’s Thimble Theater started life as one — something most people, me included, tend to forget.

The feature gained a second life in comic books, having a long run in DC’s Flash Comics, and then, sort of, a third  one.  In 1947 members of Wheelan’s Minute Movies  cast ”Fuller Phun’ and “Archibald Clubb”, a.k.a. the comedy team of Flat and Slat appeared in four quarterly issues of Fat & Slat.

It might be a little too on the nose to call Flat & Slat professional Mutt and Jeff imitators but they absolutely were.  In both teams it’s the comic relief who got top-billing  (I’ve often railed that nothing could be “too on the nose” but, yeah, calling a fat guy “Fat” is a little to0 on the nose).  About the only major difference between the two pairs I’ve been able to find is Mutt had a cat named Cicero and Fat had a dog named Big Shot.  They even drove the some model of dinky cartoon car; I like to think they (as well as Donald Duck and Mr. Natural) all got them at the same dealership.  I’ve even given it a name; Imaginary Motors.   

As previously established I’m a big Mutt and Jeff fan so seeing the same sort of cheap joke book gags illustrated by a master cartoonist doesn’t hurt my feelings one little bit.  And, maybe it’s just me, but doesn’t this cover look a lot like a 1960′s underground comix?

Much more of interest is “Comics” McCormick, The World’s No. 1 Comic Book Fan.  It contrasts the everyday life of ur-fanboy “Comics” and his fellow members of  The Little  Conquerors  Athletic and Reading Club with his superhero fueled fantasies.  The fantasy stuff is OK (especially the part where he teams up with Voltage, Mighty Man of Lightning, who fights crime literally dressed for a track meet), but frankly I prefer the company of The Little Conquerors.  It’s a pretty progressive organization for 1947 as it’s membership soon includes Rosalie Brown, who in spite of being a (*gasp*) girl not only reads comics but is “a reg’lar feller and a swell little person”.   In the course of the story “Comics” makes an impassioned speech about how women can be superheroes to0.

Of course on the other hand there’s the toxic racist stereotype  of Ajax, “the young son of the Browns colored cook” who speaks in the era’s  standard minstrel dialect.   It’s pretty egregious, especially considering that in the late 40′s when this sort of racist imagery was finally being retired.  But under mitigating circumstances is the fact while Ajax actually has to say “Sho ‘Nuff” he’s always treated as one of the gang.  And of course I have to admire Wheelan’s handling of resident fat kid Wilbur Wiggins who’s actually given the dignity of a proper name.  It’s just as well since the kid has enough problems, i.e., his mother dresses him funny.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Thursday, February 23, 2012

“Colonial Slavery”, 1830: African American History Month & Pre-YK Talkies

WARNING: The below comic strip contains racist imagery and slurs.

Above, Colonial Slavery, by artist William Heath, from issue #8, August, 1830, of the British cartoon monthly, The Looking Glass. This comic strip parodies the hypocrisy of logic used by the British government, to exonerate the actions of British slave owners in their colony of Jamaica. Britain would outlaw slavery three years later, in 1833 (though, transferring the slaves into indentured servitude, to their former owners — not much better).

In addition to being for African American History Month, this strip is also one of numerous examples of Pre-YK Talkies — sequential comic strips whose stories are told via the combination of pictures and word balloons, years before the 1896 R.F.O. Yellow Kid strip that many long credited as having “invented” the above style of comics story-telling).

Click on the above comic strip to view it in detail, and read the word balloons & captions.

Doug Wheeler

BlackHistory PreYKStrips LookingGlass

Doug
Doug

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Dinin’ Outs # 663

 

 

Start your day with some particularly trippy Ditko, teamed with Paul Levitz in Mike Friedrich’s “groundlevel” comic, Imagine. 

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2012/02/cosmic-week-summoning-by-levitz-and.html

And here we see 22 examples of exciting and occasionally racist covers of Airboy in Air Fighters Comics from the forties.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2012/02/air-fighters-comics-22-issues.html

Here are some covers and pages from the British version of Mad including a Dr. Who parody by Steve Parkhouse.

http://themagicwhistle.blogspot.com/2012/02/british-mad.html

And finally, our old pal Mykal has started yet another blog, this one a look at DC’s perennial know-it-all avenging ghost, The Spectre!

http://www.thespectrelives.com/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Paupers: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 80

Above, the 1%, demonstrating against the 99%, denouncing the working class as “Paupers”. Titled Are Honest Laborers Paupers?, from front cover of the March 9th, 1889 issue of San Francisco’s humor weekly, the Wasp.

Click on the above picture, to view it in full detail.

To find prior episodes of this series,click on Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons. And, to find earlier posts concerning financial reforms in general, click here.

Doug Wheeler

financial reform WaspMag

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Ghost Rider Month Continues

 

It’s out and the reviews are in! Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance has everyone talking. Here’s what the critics are saying: “This is a boring movie,” “confusing mess,” “another step downward in the spiral to the bottom of Nicolas Cage’s film career,” “isn’t any fun,” “sucks on a level I can scarcely describe,” “Cage chews more scenery than a pack of hungry termites,” “a movie about a man who is frequently on fire SHOULD NOT BE BORING!” Wow! Nothing but rave reviews! This film is a bona fide smash!

 

I wonder if Gary Friedrich still wants his name on it?

 

Yet the audience response is 46% positive, so maybe critics don’t know everything. And here at D.J. David B. Studios, all we care about is music anyway, so on with the tunes!

 

Today, we present the German take on Ghost Rider, courtesy of Ensemble Petticoat & Schickedance. I don’t speak German but as far as I can tell, the song is about a BMW. I have to assume it’s a BMW motorcycle they’re talking about. After all, that’s how the Ghost Rider rolls.

 

Click the links below to listen.

BMW 501 – Ensemble Petticoat & Schickedance

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Tigwissel Tuesdays #18: Colonizing the North Pole

I hadn’t given thought to just how few Tuesdays are free of Presidential Primaries or Holidays the first half of this year. It’s been a month since the previous Tigwissel Tuesday, and will be a month again until the next.

Anyway, we’ll continue to sporadically present other scientists, inventors, and explorer parodies, between actual Prof. Tigwissel episodes, until we get back to a large succession of open Tuesdays.

Above, from the front page of the April 8th, 1878 issue of the (New York) Daily Graphic, The Humors of the Howgate Colonization Plan. Some Cool Reflections., by Prof. Tigwissel‘s creator, comic artist Livingston Hopkins. This parodies the plans of Captain Howard Howgate — who, lead a polar expedition in 1878, and who yes, indeed, had the goal of colonizing the Arctic…

Click on the above comic to view it in detail, and read its text.

Below, Hopkins had previously touched on the subject of Arctic exploration, in Prof. Tigwissel‘s third comic strip appearance, of July 28th, 1875. Click on the below comic, to be taken to a description of it, and find link to high resolution version.

Doug Wheeler

NYDailyGraphic Polar Exploration

Doug
Doug

Monday, February 20, 2012

William Howard Taft: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, February 1912, Part 6

Continuing our coverage of Presidential Campaign 1912 (and Cartoons Magazine‘s Centennial Year), we have above a set of cartoons from the February 1912 issue, devoted to incumbent president Howard Taft (Republican), whose presidency is most remembered for his being so fat, he got stuck in his bath tub! Unfortunately, that event happened on his Inauguration Day in 1909 — if it had been in 1912, I can only imagine the glorious page-after-page of cartoons, that Cartoons Magazine might then have gathered! (This does get me to thinking, though, if I might not have such 1909 cartoons, elsewhere…)

Anyway, the above set of cartoons largely deal with calls the sitting President Taft, to drop out of the race — and his refusal to do so.

Click on the above picture, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their texts.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics Ole May Milton R. Halladay

Doug
Doug

Monday, February 20, 2012

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Airboy Vol. 7, #8

Thanks to the Steranko History of Comics Airboy became one of my favorite Golden Age characters long before I ever got the chance to read his comics.  It’s easy to understand why kids in the 40′s felt the same way; he was a teenager who did what most of them desperately wanted to do; fly a super cool plane and get into the fighting.   A creation of Charles Biro, he made his first appearance in the second issue of Air Fighter Comics, a comic dedicated to independent contractor WW II airplane drivers who flew gimmick planes.  But Airboy broke out of a herd of also-rans like Iron Ace and Sky Wolf thanks in large part to Birdie, a sort of alive plane that flew by flapping it’s wings.

And, speaking of things that 40′s kids wanted to do, there was Airboy’s frenemy femme fatale Valkyrie (a.k.a. The Girl Who Had Trouble Keeping Her Blouse Buttoned; I had no idea 1940′s breast management technology was so advanced).  Man, Airboy got a lot of action, especially for a fourteen year old in the 1940′s.

With the 23rd issue it became Airboy and the comics only other regular feature was a back-up featuring The Heap, a supporting player swamp monster from the old Air Fighter Comics days.

Things got pretty weird for Airboy after the war.  Oh, sure there was some crime fighting but for the most part when he wasn’t trying to straighten out spoiled rich kids (and you be surprised just how often something so far out of his job description came up) he faced an oddball  assortment of would-be world conquerors, monsters, aliens and supernatural menaces.  I place into evidence this issue of Airboy Vol. 7, #8.

When The Heap was revived in the 1980′s he was colored moss green, pretty much the color scheme we’ve come to expect a swamp monster to sport from years of seeing Swamp Thing and Man-Thing.  But as you can see in the 50′s he was depicted as being Abominable Snowman white.  Frankly, I kind of prefer him this way.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Monday, February 20, 2012

Dukin’ Dames # 562

 

 

 

Let’s start off your week with a rare look at Blast Blair, a little-known early sixties astronaut-themed newspaper strip.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2012/02/we-have-blast-off-saturday-letover-day.html

Here’s a fascinating piece on the historical and mythological origins of heroes.

http://www.comicscube.com/2012/02/she-is-screaming-in-shower-superheroes.html#more

Here’s a promising new blog devoted to Ace Comics, a nearly forgotten also-ran comics publisher of the 1950′s.

http://aces-of-ace.de/

Finally today, here’s a whole big bunch of Steve Ditko splash pages from the pre-Spidey days.

http://ferrandelgado.blogspot.com/2012/02/seleccion-de-splashes-de-steve-ditko-y.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Blaine Game

April 23rd, 1884 — one week following the first Blaine Tattooed-Man cartoonPuck magazine featured the above centerspread cartoon, by Puck founder Joseph Keppler, Sr. This cartoon — titled Blaine O’Maine — concentrates on the Mulligan Letters, which involved James G. Blaine‘s corruption involving railroad stock and land rights, and is one of the tattoes always found on him, in the Tattooed-Man cartoon series. This one is obviously not one of the Tattooed-Man cartoons, but I thought it would be good to show something involving what the tattooes are about, before getting back into them (next week).

Click on the above cartoon, to both view it in detail, and read the captions.

Below, commentary from the same issue of Puck.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics NYPuck KepplerSr

Doug
Doug

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