Super I.T.C.H » 2011 » April
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for April, 2011

Saturday, April 30, 2011

Makin’ Leeks # 411

Otto Binder and C.C. Beck re-teamed in 1967 to try to recapture their Golden Age Fawcett magic with Fatman, the Human Flying Saucer…which ran exactly three issues.

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2011/04/fatman-human-flying-saucer-1.html

We’re on record as being fans of the late Howie Post around here and here we have some rarely seen Rodeo Rick stories from DC’s Western Comics in the 1950′s.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2011/04/more-serious-post-friday-comic-book-day.html

Sequential Crush ran a poll to see who fans wanted to see more romance work from and John Romita won so guess who’s on view today?

http://sequentialcrush.blogspot.com/2011/04/your-poll-pick-john-romita.html

Finally today, here’s a little-seen Archie story from one of the redhead’s early artists, Harry Sahle, offered as a reminder that Craig’s Archie Book is out and getting rave reviews!

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2011/04/archie-jackpot-1942.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, April 29, 2011

Pre-YK Talkies: White-Bait, by William Heath, 1830

For today, a quick example of yet another “Pre-YK Talkie”. I.e., multi-panel sequential cartoons, told via a combination of pictures plus in-panel dialogue/word balloons, in which the story would not be understood without either the pictures or the in-panel dialogue. Like Donald Trump making claims without evidence or bothering to do research, numerous respected “comics historians” for decades stated that this style of comic strip did not appear until R.F. Outcault “invented” it in the October 25, 1896 episode of the Yellow Kid. Our continuing series on Pre-YK Talkies, reveal just some of the many examples to be found, if one merely looks for them.

The above example, White-Bait, by William Heath, comes from issue 7 of the London published cartoon periodical, The Looking Glass. It was published on July 1st, 1830 — sixty-six years prior to the acclaimed Yellow Kid episode.

Click on the above picture to see a larger, more readable version.

P.S., none of this is to take away from Outcault or The Yellow Kid, both of which were great. Outcault himself never claimed to have invented “talking” comic strips. My purpose is to open up the entire history of pre-YK comic strips — “talking” and not — as being legitimate. The best way (in my opinion), to tear apart the argument that no pre-1896 comic strips were “real”, is to show that, yes, indeed, strips meeting the precise same definition did exist before Yellow Kid. And not just a few, rare, aberrations seen by no one. But multiple instances, popping up for decades, some of which were widely distributed and seen (such as some of the advertising strips we’ve already shown).

Doug Wheeler

PreYKStrips

Doug
Doug

Friday, April 29, 2011

Makin’ Likes # 410

Let’s start today with the issue of Charlton Bullseye that revived the then-recently cancelled fan-favorite, E-Man, by the original creators–Nick Cuti and Joe Staton (now the artist on Dick Tracy!).

http://waffyjon.blogspot.com/2011/04/fandom-library-charlton-bullseye-4.html#more

Not a big fan of Alex Nino myself but if I had to choose, my favorite of his work would most definitely be the DC graphic novel, Space Clusters. It’s pretty.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2011/04/space-clusters.html

Let’s take our first look at Cole’s Comics in awhile where we find a number of the Plastic Man creator’s silly Burp the Twerp single-pagers.

http://colescomics.blogspot.com/2011/04/eight-new-insignificant-eructations.html

Finally today, another place we’ve neglected too long is the nifty Whirled of Kelly where we find Unca Walt’s Adventures of Peter Wheat currently on display.

http://whirledofkelly.blogspot.com/2011/04/fairy-tale-within-fairy-tale.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Booksteve Reviews

Well…more like Booksteve gushes, I suppose.

Well, it’s finally out! ARCHIE—A CELEBRATION OF AMERICA’S FAVORITE TEENAGERS. This is NOT a review. The reason that this is not a review is that, in a very real way, I feel that this is MY book! Don’t get me wrong! It is most definitely Craig Yoe’s book. That said, I wrote first drafts of a half-dozen sections of the book (including one that didn’t make it in), provided artwork, conducted research and interviews, transcribed some of Craig’s interviews and proofread the darn thing at least three times! Others also participated including Clizia Guzzoni, Mark Arnold and Steve Barghusen. It’s their book, too. But that doesn’t make it any less MY book!

And what a book it is! It’s a very different thing to see all of this material in various formats and then see what a masterful job Mr. Yoe has done in piecing it all together into such a perfect design for the material.

The book tells the basic history of Archie Comics. As the book was sanctioned by Archie Comics, there will be undoubtedly some who complain that this is a censored, one-sided history. My response to that is that the goal was never to air anyone’s dirty laundry but instead to celebrate the classic Riverdale characters and their creators, past and present. There’s too much negativity in the world today…but not in Riverdale.

So don’t complain about what isn’t there, enjoy what is! Page after page of classic or rare and often previously unpublished artwork from Montana, DeCarlo, Goldberg, Lucey, Bolling, Ruiz and Parent. There are toys, collectibles, records, scenes from both the radio and TV cartoon series. Add in tons of little-seen annotated photographs, biographies of the characters as well as some of the major writers and artists, interviews, overviews and a number of classic stories from the earliest days right up to the Archie Renaissance of 2010 and beyond—some reproduced in high quality scans of the original art!

You want to quibble about what isn’t there? Be my guest. Having had some of my own writing cut for various reasons and having discovered many fascinating facts that just didn’t fit for one reason or another, I’m sure I could out-quibble you. But that’s not the point. The point is that for seventy years, Archie and his Pals ‘n’ Gals have delighted each succeeding generation of readers with wholesome hi-jinks and memorable cartooning. If you’ve ever been a fan, this book will delight you. If you never gave the company a second thought, this book will surprise you. If you’ve just discovered Archie…I envy you. ARCHIE—A CELEBRATION OF AMERICA’S FAVORITE TEENAGERS will absolutely amaze you!

It’s my book and I’m proud of it. It’s very much Craig Yoe’s book. And best of all, it’s waiting to be YOUR book, too! Check your local comic shop or you can order it elsewhere on this very page!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Makin’ Licks # 409

Reed Crandall was one of those few comics artists who were too good for the room…and he just kept getting better. Here, though, a big bunch of early Blackhawk tales by Crandall.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2011/04/blackhawk-by-reed-crandall-military.html

Here’s some of artist Mac Raboy’s wonderful Alex Raymond-inspired art on a 1940′s Doctor Voodoo tale tale from Fawcett’s Whiz Comics.

http://comicbookcatacombs.blogspot.com/2011/04/dr-voodoo-in-quest-for-golden-flaskpart.html

Speaking of Raboy, it was a Fawcett standard to draw Captain Marvel Jr like Raboy whenever possible. Here, we see him in the one and only appearance of the Crime Crusaders Club from a 1943 Minute Man story.

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2011/04/crime-crusaders-club-phil-bard-1943.html

Finally today, here we have a nice selection of the later–post Beck–Captain Tootsie strip ads for Tootsie Rolls, these by Bill Schreiber.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2011/04/tooting-my-own-horn-wednesday.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: A Question For Popeye?

If you’ve been following along at home you know that I, D. J. David B., have been presenting Popeye songs every Tuesday in recent memory, in celebration of the recent release of “Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf” (available now on Amazon).

Today I am proud (?) to present a duet starring Popeye and his main squeeze Olive Oyl. What was he thinking? (Popeye, I mean.) In the nails-on-a-chalkboard department I think it surpasses the duet of Archie and Edith Bunker on “Those Were The Days.” You decide. Click the link to listen.

Why Do You Answer a Question with a Question

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Makin’ Leaks # 408

Here’s a collection of a fun dozen covers–mostly Silver Age–cleverly reflecting the theme, “When Logos Attack.” Clever, funny and  a great showcase for some innovative design work.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2011/04/when-logos-attack.html

Here once again is my old friend, Pussycat, the most obscure Marvel character of them all and subject of my very first published article back in 1988. He gets the credits wrong but still…

http://atocom.blogspot.com/2011/04/reading-room-pussycat-agent-of-score-in.html

Here we see a particularly odd 1972 back-up story from a bizarre set of partly pseudonymous creators including Jack Katz pencilling and Bill Everett inking.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2011/04/bring-on-back-ups-spell-of-sea-witch.html

Finally today, here’s a look at Harvey Kurtzman’s first job for Warren–an ill-fated, non-comics attempt at duplicating the success of Famous Monsters...with Cowboys!

http://hairygreeneyeball3.blogspot.com/2011/04/forgotten-kurtzman.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, April 25, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Big Shot Comics #6

Big Shot Comics

Image via Wikipedia

Big Shot Comics was a pretty standard Golden Age comic book anthology from one of the smaller publishers of the era, the Columbia Comics Corporation.  Formed in 1940 by Vin Sullivan (the DC Comics editor who bought Superman from Siegel and Shuster) and the McNaught Newspaper Syndicate, they published comics which were a mix of reprints of McNaught comic strips (like Dixie Dugan, Joe Palooka and Joe Palooka) and original material (Skyman, The Face and Marvelo, The Monarch of Magicians).  Besides Big Shot Comics Columbia published Skyman, The Face (which became Tony Trent with #3 when the character’s alter ego lost interest in playing with his signature fright mask) and Sparky Watts.

A lot of comic books in the Golden Age pretty had an identical format but what Big Shot Comics had going for it (beyond it’s catchy name and striking logo) was consistently strong artwork and interesting characters.

Skyman was the creation of Ogden Whitney and Gardner Fox.  In reality Allen Turner, he was one of those lower case supermen that reached the apex of human mental and physical development via rigorous training.  He was also a genius inventor and millionaire who created his super red, white and blue flying wing type plane called (naturally) The Wing and used it and his trusty sidearm the Atom-atic to fight crime for no discernible reason.

“The” (shoving the definitive article into the name of a hero can often make said hero seem cooler, but in this case especially it seems to have been inserted in a wholly arbitrarily and unnecessarily fashion) Skyman, as he liked to be called in early issues, is generally well regarded by Golden Age fans in spite of the fact he was clearly just a Dime Store version of Captain Midnight.  This seems to be due mostly due to his memorable costume and the generally strong art of Ogden Whitney.

The Gardner Fox story here presented here has a fairly routine masked mystery man vs. gangsters after a scientist’s new invention plot that comes complete with the scientist’s standard issue beautiful daughter who goes all squishy at the sight of Skyman.  But it is noteworthy that the invention in question is a machine that cures cancer, which is unusual as there was a taboo about directly mentioning the disease by name in popular culture of the 1940′s.

Previously I praised the artwork of Ogden Whitney but clearly in this issue he was struggling with just how to depict superheroic anatomy.  I mean, this is how he draws his alter ego Allen Turner…

…and this is how he draws Skyman.

His upper body looks particularly inflated once placed alongside a relatively normal (if full-figured) human figure.  Also notice Fawn Carroll, the beautiful scientist’s daughter,  is totally copping a feel of Skyman’s dreamy muscles; throughout the story she uses every pretext possible to feel the poor guy up.  I mean, the attention must be nice and everything but, damn it, the poor guy is trying to work.

And in this panel Whitney seems to have lost complete control of his anatomy and Skyman is drawn out of proportion and starts looking a bit like Whitney’s other great creation, Herbie Popnecker, The Fat Fury.

You know, most guys pretty much assume this if you’re doing it with them at all, still, it never hurts to actually tell them every once in a while.

Marvelo, Monarch of Magicians was another one of Fred Guardineer’s dapper Mandrake the Magician imitator’s (Zatara, Master Magician, Yarko the Great, Tor the Magic Master, etc.)  But no mere hypnotist was Marvelo; along with sporting a very stylish look (not everyone can pull off an ice cream suit with tails, turban and a slash) he used his magic magic word “Kalora” to conjure up some really wild and surreal stuff.  Like, inanimate objects which suddenly sprouted human limbs or this appearance by “The Recording Angel”, who apparently in some cosmology unknown to me is God’s secretary.

And this really weird sequence where he turns a gangster into what the script assures us is a “midget” but which, clearly, is a doll with an over sized head.

And here’s an early appearance of The Face, created by artist Mart Bailey.  As previously established he’s one of my favorite Golden Age characters, but this rather dull ‘mystery’ (which, sadly, might have been written by Gardner Fox) highlights a couple of problems with the character.  For instance, I love his baby blue tuxedo; it’s a bold, distinctive look for a crime fighter.  But nobody ever seems to put 2+2 together when announcer Tony Trent is seen dressed that way and a couple seconds later The Face appears in the exact same tuxedo. Plus there’s the little matter of what, exactly, did people think The Face was? A Werewolf waiter? A Jekyll crossed with a Esquire magazine male model? I haven’t read all his adventures but as far as I know nobody upon seeing him ever cried out, “Ah, there’s a guy in a really scary mask!”  That would kind of defeat the whole purpose of the premise. In spite of the fact that he’s still considered monstrous enough looking to make a woman faint (which is pretty much SOP in this stage of his career) a little later someone assumes he’s a detective.  Not a detective with a penchant for dressing up, nor a masked mystery man,  just a detective.  Which raises the question; just how many detectives with a monster’s face does this guy know?

And along with these features, and the comic strip reprints, were a trio of handsome (if slightly dull features), like Tom Kerry by Fred Guardineer…

Spy-Chief by Mart Bailey…

…and Rocky Ryan by Ogden Whitney.



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Steve Bennett
Steveland

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Makin’ Easter Eggs # 407

Along with the Great Pumpkin, Charles Schulz also gave the world the Easter Beagle–here he is in his 1974 TV debut, It’s the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown!

http://classicshowbiz.blogspot.com/2011/04/its-easter-beagle-charlie-brown-1974.html

Have a great Easter, all.More next time!

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Saturday, April 23, 2011

Makin’ Larks # 406

You know the classic Casper the Friendly Ghost? Well, this isn’t him but an incredible rip-of…err…simulation–the long-running Timmy the Timid Ghost from Charlton by Al Fago.

http://www.bigblogcomics.com/2011/04/timmy-timid-ghost-in-mischievous.html

Here’s a nice tribute to one of my personal favorite late sixties Marvel characters, the much-maligned and/or nearly forgotten superhero version of Doctor Strange.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2011/04/mask-of-strange.html

Here’s a fascinating selection of counter-cultural cartoons from the 1960′s originally published in the pages of Paul Krassner’s The Realist.

http://themagicwhistle.blogspot.com/2011/04/realist-4.html

Finally, for today, here’s a couple early, short,  politically incorrect gag strips from Air Fighters Comics by Mad’s ever-youthful King of the Fold-In’s, the great Al Jaffee.

http://allthingsger.blogspot.com/2011/04/racial-tolerance-day-friday-comic-book.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

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