Super I.T.C.H » 2011 » March
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for March, 2011

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Popeye Strikes Back

The book is out and the reviews are in! “Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf” is a hit. To celebrate, here’s yet another Popeye song! (What else?)

 

If you’ve been following along at home you know that in recent weeks we’ve been proud to present some wonderful Popeye-related tunes. Today we’re ashamed to present a medley of awful songs that’s so bad, you won’t be able to tell which one you hate most. Forgettable tunes like “Let’s Build a Bridge,” “There’s Nothing That Can Compare With a Hamburger,” “Popeye on Parade,” “Come Climb A Mountain With Me,” “A Clean-Shaven Man,” and “Brotherly Love” will rocket to the top of Your Hate Parade in no time.

 Think I’m kidding? Click the link below to listen.

Popeye – Let’s Build A Bridge

David B
DJ David B.

Monday, March 21, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — The Face #1

It isn’t exactly hard to say why The Face is one of my favorite Golden Age heroes; it was his striking visual.  Specifically the dichotomy between that memorable green (though for some reason in all the stores in The Face #1 it’s colored a bright blue) fright mask,with it’s fangs, strangely proceeding hairline and dark shading around the eyes suggestive of a domino mask and his working clothes, a powder blue tuxedo.

When radio announcer Tony Trent (who had to wear the exact same tuxedo, even when no one could see him as a job requirement; fun fact, until 1938 all NBC radio announcers were required to do their jobs while wearing tuxedos) became sick of the crime stories dominating the news he added a mask to his ensemble and became the crime fighter The Face.

There wasn’t anything special let alone supernatural about Trent’s mask (you’re probably thinking of The Mask) though at least initially it wasn’t just a piece of molded rubber.  Originally it supposedly conformed so closely to his face that it didn’t look like a mask and though Trent intended to only frighten cowardly criminals he pretty much freaked out anybody who crossed his path.  No explanation was ever given as to how Trent acquired it, at least not in the Golden Age, but in the three issues of What Is…The Face? published by A.C.E. Comic (which featured artwork by Steve Ditko and this really kicking Alex Toth cover) published between1986 and ’87 it was hinted it was much more than a simple disguise.

No Tony Trent was just a guy who was reasonably good in a fight and handy with a .45 who out of a sense of moral indignation (and, I’d like to think, because it was so much damn fun) went around beating the crap out of gangsters…and that was good enough for me.  Though, if absolutely forced to I’d admit that like most really good Golden Age characters there was a wide, wild streak of unfulfilled potential running right through The Face.  On the surface at least he seemed to be a monster who decided to give crime fighting a try, like a Dick Tracy villain gone straight or if Dr. Jekyll decided to go hunt humans and knew nobody would care as long as he preyed on the dregs of society.

And let’s not kid ourselves, there was that suit.  Back in those days no matter who or what you were (it took me like 40 years but recently it occurred to me that even the Frankenstein Monster was expected to wear a suit) you were expected to make a little effort when it came to your appearance.

It should also be noted that The Face was an always handsome feature drawn by Matt Bailey which managed to really hang in there, appearing in such Colombia Comics as Big Shot Comics #1-104, The Face #1-2, Skyman #1 and Sparky Watts #1

However by 1941 The Face had lost a lot of his appeal (for me anyway) by having Trent travel to the Pacific where, naturally, he fought the Japanese wearing attire more suitable for the climate.  More appropriate, sure, but this was further evidence that ‘realistic’ doesn’t often translate into ‘fun’ (in this story Trent also realizes that wearing a full rubber mask in the tropics isn’t exactly practical and elects to create a cheesecloth version).

Another interesting fact about The Face he was one of those masked mystery men who managed to survive a few more years by ditching the whole masked man angle.  By 1948 Tony had given up being The Face and fought crime as himself, appearing in two issues of his own title.

Plus there’s a nice MARVELO story…

…and the always wonderful SPARKY WATTS.

t

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Monday, March 21, 2011

Mfdhwen Lhbufks # 389

Been meaning to link to this for ages–here we have all seven issues of Stig’s Inferno, the wacky and hilarious Vortex series that put Ty Templeton on the map back during the eighties comics boom.

http://www.templetons.com/ty/stig/

Speaking of the eighties boom, here we see a cover gallery of what was easily the best horror comic of its day, Bruce Jones’ Twisted Tales from Eclipse with covers from Wrightson, Corben, Stevens, Bolton and Pound.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2011/03/twisted-tales-1982-1987-cover-art-by.html

Here we see some lovely if faded digital examples of Polly and Her Pals sunday strips–follow the link within the link to enjoy even more of this classic strip.

http://hairygreeneyeball3.blogspot.com/2011/03/polly-and-her-pals.html

Finally today, here is the quintessential Avengers story from way back in 1968–”Even An Android Can Cry” by Roy Thomas with still-stunning superhero art by John Buscema and George Klein.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2011/03/even-android-can-cry-by-roy-thomas-and.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Mauurn Lidbeks # 388

The return of Marvel’s X-Men in the group’s ultimately more successful incarnation in 1975 led also to some fun and wonderful splash pages by the late Dave Cockrum as seen here.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2011/03/making-splash-dave-cockrums-x-men-part.html

Captain George’s Comic World was an amazing little copyright-violating fan publication out of Canada in the late sixties, each issue on a different subject of comics collecting interest and many even in different formats. Here’s one now.

http://hairygreeneyeball3.blogspot.com/2011/03/captain-georges-how-to-draw.html

Speaking of sixties fanzines and Captains, here’s a complete pre-Batmania issue of Captain Biljo’s now- legendary and classic Batman ‘zine, Batmania.

http://waffyjon.blogspot.com/2011/03/fandom-library-batmania-3.html

Finally today, here’s the wonderfully illustrated first of several upcoming pieces at 20 Century Danny Boy on “Kraven’s Last Hunt”, arguably the best Spider-Man story of the past 30 years.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2011/03/original-art-stories-kravens-last-hunt.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, March 18, 2011

Mtfxn Lvrsdiks # 387

Let’s start today with one of several blogs that salute the 6oth birthday of Dennis the Menace–not our Dennis Mitchell but the completely unrelated UK terror tot.

http://kidr77.blogspot.com/2011/03/now-we-are-sixtydenniss-birthday.html

Whilst we’re across the pond, let’s check out a strip from 1974 entitled Danny Doom in which our hero meets the Hand of Orloff.

http://theyellowedpages.blogspot.com/2011/03/danny-doom-hand-of-orloff-valiant-lion.html

Here Pappy runs a wacky Sub-Mariner tale I just ran on my own blog a couple of days back but raises me another one and even throws in an odd extra treat! Go, Pappy! You can never get enough Namor!

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2011/03/number-914-subby-nontraditional-ive-got.html

Finally today, by “my blog,” I of course mean Four-Color Shadows where another recently featured hero you’ve never heard of was Carl Burgos’ Manowar aka The White Streak.

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2011/03/manowar-white-streak-carl-burgos-1939.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Mteucjn Libdks # 386

Posting problems again so this is half of the links you were supposed to receive yesterday. Since I couldn’t remember what the other two were, you get two brand new ones for today, also.

I got the recent 2 volume box set of Harvey Kurtzman’s Humbug for my birthday in January. Looks like our pal Rip just picked up a copy, too, and here he shares a cover gallery.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2011/03/ah-humbug.html

Here’s Man-God, Marvel’s retitled black and white adaptation of Phillip Wylie’s archetypal prose superhero novel, Gladiator, as seen through the eyes of Roy Thomas and artist Tony DeZuniga.

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2011/03/black-and-white-wednesday-man-god-by.html

Here’s some interesting illustrated speculation on the age of the Silver Age Superman using pertinent info and panels from the comics themselves as well as early ads and letters pages.

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-old-is-superman.html

Finally today, the first two appearances of Archie Andrews’ African-American pal Chuck Clayton, introduced as a token black character in 1971 but now a major player in the Riverdale gang!

http://kb-outofthisworld.blogspot.com/2011/03/diversity-in-comics-chuck-clayton-and.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

McFadden’s Row of Flats

In honor (a day early) of St. Patrick’s Day, a pair of (non-Outcault authorized) Yellow Kid ephemera. Above, a rear cover advertisement, found on the back of an 1890s music sheet, featuring an obvious Yellow Kid rip-off. Below, the front & back covers plus interior from a flyer advertising one (of several) theatrical versions of McFadden’s Row of Flats. This version featured the Yellow Kid Twins, who starred in the parallel, rival Hogan’s Alley drawn by George Luks for the New York World. The World/Luks cartoon ran for a year opposite the New York Journal American/Outcault version of Yellow Kid, when William Randolph Hearst’s hiring of Outcault away from the World, resulted in a dispute over ownership of the character.

Click on the pictures above & below, to open larger versions.

Doug Wheeler

TheatricalCartoons AdvertisingStrips

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: The Return of Popeye

After a brief interruption (one week) it’s time to return to the subject at hand: Popeye. The sailorman has been a POPular figure in the public EYE for decades, so naturally there have been many songs written about him. And what better time to present these songs to you, the loyal ITCH readers, than right now when “Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf” is finally in comics shops and bookstores. (If you don’t have a comics shop or a bookstore nearby, you can always order the book from Amazon.)

 

Here’s a tune you weren’t expecting. It’s “I Yam What I Yam” by with a vocal by Robin Williams. And if that’s not enough, the music was written by Harry Nilsson and arranged by Van Dyke Parks. Wow!

Click the link below to listen.

I Yam What I Yam – Robin Williams

David B
DJ David B.

Monday, March 14, 2011

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Beanbags #1

The publisher Ziff-Davis published quite a few handsome action/adventure (Explorer Joe), western (Kid Cowboy) and science fiction (Lars From Mars, Crusader From Mars) titles that featured their signature pretty painted covers.  But hey also produced some really oddball comics such as Big Jon and Sparkie and Sparkie, a pair of titles that featured the adventures of “America’s Beloved Radio Pixie’.  From the context I’ve got to assume that Sparkie was supposed to have been a character from a children’s radio (or at least it seems like he was) but with so little to work with the internet provided no information.

I thought that Sparkie was about a strange as Ziff-Davis got but then I (once again) discovered something that I never imagined existed, Beanbags. It was a comic-adventure series  drawn in a bigfoot cartoon style that lasted two issues.  It concerned  the crew of a tug boat, the big and well meaning Bozo, the Alfalfa from The Little Rascals looking Beanbags and pretty girl Idabelle.  The first issue issue told a single story broken into complete in themselves chapters about their journey to the country of  Zanytopia, the first of which I’m posting here.  It was drawn by Ben Brown and inked by David Gantz who did work for Atlas and Toby Press, funny animal stuff like Buzzy Rabbit for Quality and Dilly Duncan at Lev Gleason.

I’m still trying to decide whether Beanbags is good exactly, but it is certainly odd, and in my book odd almost always gets you at least half way to good.

I have a strange fondness for Kid Cowboy, if only because he had the most on the nose name for a cowboy character this side of Atlas Comics The Western Kid.

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Steve Bennett
Steveland

Monday, March 14, 2011

Myemxin Ldnerlks # 385

Let’s start today with a movie over at my place-on paper anyway–1939′s The Mystery of Mister Wong starring Boris Karloff as originally serialized in Dell’s Popular Comics.

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2011/03/mystery-of-mr-wong-tom-hickey-1939.html

One of my personal favorite sixties artifacts was/is Bunny, Harvey Comics hipper than hip version of Marvel’s Millie the Model crossed with a bit of Archie. Here’s Part one of a two part piece on Bunny.

http://kb-outofthisworld.blogspot.com/2011/03/diversity-in-comics-marcy-and-bunny-i.html

It’s hard to go wrong with a Golden Age Sub-Mariner story so here’s a wonderfully wacky tale of our triangle-headed anti-hero drawn by Allen Simon.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2011/03/sub-mariner-in-flying-graveyard-by.html

Finally today, here’s more Bud Sagendorf Popeye at The Big Blog of Kids Comics, this time accompanied by a wonderful review of Craig’s new Popeye book, orderable on this page.

http://www.bigblogcomics.com/2011/03/book-review-popeye-great-comic-book.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

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