Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » September
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for September, 2010

Thursday, September 23, 2010

MaKiN’ linkS # 274

Legendary cartoonist Milt Gross has been in the news a lot this year, mostly due to Craig’s recent biography/collection. Here’s the great John Kricfalusi with his interpretation of classic Hanna-Barbera characters done in the style of Milt Gross! Check it out and then go back often and check out the rest of John K’s fun art blog!

http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2010/09/what-if-milt-gross-drew-hb-characters.html

Here are a whole big bunch of beautiful Mickey Mouse paintings done by longtime Mickey strip artist Floyd Gottfredson (the Good Mouse Artist), mostly in the 1980′s.

http://greatestape.blogspot.com/2010/08/floyd-gottfredson.html

B Western cowboy–or should it be C Western cowboy–Whip Wilson, described as a low-rent Lash LaRue, is on display at Four-Color Shadows from one of his 3 Atlas Comics issues of the early 1950′s.

http://fourcolorshadows.blogspot.com/2010/09/whip-wilson-duel-in-desert-1950.html

Finally, love him or hate him, one can’t deny that Marvel’s Punisher has come a long way his introduction as a Spider-Man villain…and besides, he has a cool costume. Here’s his very first appearance.

http://mailittoteamup.blogspot.com/2010/09/amazing-spider-man-129.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Los Caprichos de Mr. Fish

James Gillray. Thomas Rowlandson. William Hogarth. Goya and Nast. Mauldin and Minor. Conrad.

Political cartooning is a completely unique form of expression because what you say and how you say it matter in equal parts, and you have to be eloquent in a very tight space. These legendary cartoonists are the greatest of all time because their achievements in all areas are unmatched. Few others have even come close.

So am I saying that Mr. Fish belongs in this sacred pantheon? Well, no I’m not. And after reading his cartoon philosophy, I’m not sure he’d want me to.

But here’s what I am saying: keep an eye on him. This brilliant mugwump is still young. Watch him as he develops his art. I believe that in twenty years, critics will fall over each other to install him in that sacred pantheon. And knowing Mr. Fish, he’ll have something pretty biting and ungrateful to say about it.

That is precisely why we will mention him in the same breath as Goya and Nast, Minor and the others.

Mr. Fish is a prodigiously talented artist who doesn’t sacrifice at the altar of Art. He is a uniquely independent observer of political life and culture. He doesn’t think anyone with power deserves it. His satire is completely catholic, aimed at Republicans, Democrats, and Independents alike. Nor does he spare the public, and its odd obsessions and unrealistic expectations.

The cartoons of Mr. Fish are unpredictable and aggressive. He employs a wide range of artistic styles. Whether it is photorealism, collage, sophisticated cartooning, child-like scrawls, even manga, he uses the style most likely to make his point hurt. He can be cruel, savage, lewd, and rude. And sometimes, he can weep.

In the contest between word and image, he mixes it up without restraint. Sometimes his intentions are cryptic, and other times, brutally clear. He makes you stare, even if you wish could look away. Pay attention when he makes you squeamish. That’s when he’s found your truth, amputated it, and made you unwillingly regard it as a stupid joke.

Frankly, in his mastery of the form, he makes most of his contemporaries look like they are phoning it in. It’s hard to believe that he even gets published. Aren’t these the truths that society would rather not face? Yet he regularly appears in prominent publications: Truthdig.com and Harpers.org.

Mr. Fish is our constant reminder that the First Amendment belongs to us, the people, and we should use it with all we’ve got. For this simple reason, his work is breathtaking. It confirms him as the cartoonist most worth reading, and most worth watching to see what he’ll say next, and how.

Mr. Fish, a.k.a. Dwayne Booth (for those who read the fine print), is also a pretty awesome guy, a real mensch to a would-be interviewer like me, because he was so very generous in his answers to our questions. Here’s your chance to get to know a bit about the man behind the best political cartoons in America.

What was your first comic strip/cartoon/comic?

Trying to pinpoint my first cartoon is a little bit like trying to pinpoint the first time I used a joke to get underneath somebody else’s skin. There was a series of comic books that I drew while I was in middle school about a fat classmate of mine called The Magnificiently Meaningless Misadventures of Ms. Suey Pig, which was usually rendered in pencil and starred me and all my friends.

Then there was the first piece of art that I did specifically for publication in the school newspaper, which I did when I was eleven. These were a pair of strips (mis)using the Peanuts characters, one that saw the death of our school principal and the other one making a remarkably tasteless joke about rape, referencing a well-known news story about a 500-pound sex offender named Jo-Jo Giorgianni. (Both were rejected by the school paper.) Then there was the first cartoon that I drew, in 1982, that directly addressed the grotesque hybrid produced by the marrying together of rightwing Christianity and modern Republicanism. Then there was the first cartoon done for publication in a zine (remember those?!) that depicted Santa Claus giving birth to Jesus Christ in a bathroom. Then there was the first cartoon published by an international magazine, Anarchy, that was about post-modern environmentalism.

What are you reading right now?

Just finishing up Donald Hall’s Unpacking the Boxes: A Memoir of a Life in Poetry, while simultaneously beginning Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters, having recently abandoned Jules Feiffer’s remarkably mediocre memoir, Backing Into Forward, while cheering the factual content and abhorring the style of David Bianculli’s book, Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of ‘The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.’ I am always re-reading Vonnegut and Mailer, mostly their non-fiction work, recent examples being Kurt’s Fates Worse Than Death and Norman’s The Spooky Art: Thoughts on Writing. Unable to read while I’m drawing, I also consume massive amounts of spoken word recordings, specifically the work of Lenny Bruce, Noam Chomsky, David Sedaris and Jack Benny.

What is your guilty pleasure?

My experience of pleasure is that it doesn’t have to be guilt-inducing. It is lovely. What’s lovely? Eating ridiculously expensive cheeses and cured meats and red grapes and crisp apples and artisan breads and drinking wine in front of an old movie, anything by Hawks or Hitchcock or Nichols or Allen, usually starring Bogart, Grant, Kelly, Stewart or Konigsberg, with my wife, who I’ve known since I was 18.

Who was the first cartoonist/animator you met?

Daryl Cagle, I guess, and a handful of his cohorts, none of whom I remember at all beyond their extraordinary kindness and benign joviality. I later interviewed Paul Conrad for the LA Weekly and accompanied him to a number of venues in and around Los Angeles. (Not surprisingly, I find that I don’t have a whole lot in common with other cartoonists.)

Which dead cartoonist/animator would you most like to meet?

John Lennon

What would you say?

I loved your books, In His Own Write, A Spaniard in the Works and Skywriting by Word of Mouth – found your lines as carefree as Picasso’s and as witty in their brevity as Thurber’s. I also understand that you did music?

What has been the highlight of your career to date?

Having my Can I Have a Grant… go viral before there was a viable Internet. Ever since first appearing in Harper’s Magazine in 1992, I’ve seen it taped up and tacked up and pasted to dozens of walls, bulletin boards and, perhaps most often, in espresso bars (where most artists work for at least a little while, usually until their rage and discontent dissipates along with their personal optimism and career prospects and they return to school to become underpaid English teachers), some as far away as the Czech Republic, a snapshot of which I received in the mail in the late 90s from a friend backpacking through Prague.

Please tell us a little about your latest project.

I currently have a half-hour animated pilot, called A Dog Goes Into a Bar, circulating around Hollywood. I also have a graphic memoir, that includes interviews with a number of counterculture heroes (like Mort Sahl, Joan Baez, Noam Chomsky, Graham Nash, and others), called One Complete Revolution, being shopped around. I also have a Mr. Fish cartoon collection scheduled to come out next year in conjunction with a pair of major art exhibitions in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Which old-time cartoon character do you most identify with?

Bugs Bunny, without a doubt.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be?

An unflinching confidence while wearing a leotard.

Unflinching confidence, indeed! The best way to read Mr. Fish is at his website. He understands better than anyone that sacred cows make the best hamburgers. You’ll fill your belly by going straight to the source.

And as always, thank you Dwayne!

beth
beth

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

M k n’ L nks # 273

Here are the first photos from the prestigious Spanish Wallace Wood art exhibit–the first ever museum exhibit of its type dedicated to the EC artist known for his sci-fi scenes, his buxom women, his Mad humor, Witzend, T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents and the Wizard King.

http://jack-kirby.over-blog.com/article-woodwork-palma-57451817.html

Wood’s art can, naturally, be found in something entitled The Illustrated History of Science Fiction Comics and here are the first couple chapters from the book with that name.

http://hairygreeneyeball2.blogspot.com/2010/09/illustrated-history-of-science-fiction.html

Hard to believe that National’s Rex the Wonder Dog ran for 46 issues in the late fifties but he did. Good dog! Here’s a nice Rex story drawn by the Gil Kane/Bernard Sachs team that typified DC’s house style at the time.

http://www.kingdomkane.com/2010/09/adventures-of-rex-wonder-dog-38-march.html

Finally today, here’s the surprise sensation of late 1975, Steve Gerber and Frank Brunner’s Howard the Duck # 1, a book that was very hard to come by in its day due to an early speculator rush!

http://swords-and-veeblefetzers.blogspot.com/2010/09/howard-duck-1.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: The Andy Panda Polka

For years I’ve been blogging (as the cool kids say) about all sorts of comics and cartoon characters. But until now I haven’t even mentioned Andy Panda. To rectify this situation I would like to present this novelty number featuring Andy himself (voiced by Mel Blanc) and Woody Woodpecker. It sounds like a hit record to me! (Albeit scratchy.)

 

Particularly enjoyable is Andy’s suggestion of whacking one’s partner during the dance. Who says violence and polka don’t mix?

 

Andy Panda comics are as rare as hen’s teeth.

 

Okay everybody, on your feet! Let’s dance!

 

Click the link below to listen.

Andy Panda Polka

David B
DJ David B.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

mAKIN’ LINkS # 272

Author, illustrator and amazing designer Arlen Schumer recently did some fun Silver Age comics-style work for ABC News and you can see the results of that collaboration here:

http://www.workbook.com/blog/1556

In case you hadn’t heard, the seventies version of Atlas Comics is about to have the most unexpected revival of the 21st century. Here, Steve Does Comics takes a look at one of Atlas lesser titles, Police Action.

http://stevedoescomics.blogspot.com/2010/09/lomax-and-luke-malone-in-police-action.html

Drawn by the classic “Swanderson” team,  prolific Superman scripter Leo Dorfman wrote this 1971 Superman vs Supergirl tale under his sometime pseudonym Geoff Browne for some reason but it’s a good one!

http://diversionsofthegroovykind.blogspot.com/2010/09/tuesday-team-up-superman-and-supergirl.html

This is always fun for us old guys–Terry Beatty has an Identify the Artist going for two St John crime comics tales from the 1950′s. I submitted my votes! It’s your turn.

http://terrybeatty.blogspot.com/2010/09/crime-on-run-name-mystery-artists.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Monday, September 20, 2010

52 Letters to Salesmen (minus several dozen)

Today, a few sample pages of cartoons meant to instruct & inspire salesmen, published in 1925 & 1926 by the Stevens-Davis Company in Chicago, which were collected into the book 52 Letters to Salemen.

<

Doug Wheeler

Doug
Doug

Sunday, September 19, 2010

maKin’ linKs # 271

Joe Kubert, the Energizer Bunny of comics artists, just keeps on going. Here’s some of his best sixties work in a handful of full-color Sunday strips from Tales of the Green Beret.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/09/happy-birthday-joe-kubert-thanks-for.html

In a nod to the annual Talk Like a Pirate day, Pappy shares a 1947 pirate tale starring Captain Fight from…well…Fight Comics, as drawn by later EC star Jack Kamen.

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2010/09/number-810-arrrrrrggghhhhh.html

Blog Into Mystery takes a look at a Silver Age DC issue of Justice League of America that attempts to answer the question of what happened to the heroes who weren’t present in a previous issue! Clever!

http://blogintomystery.wordpress.com/2010/09/18/you-know-for-an-evil-cube-creature-it-looks-rather-cheerful-justice-league-of-america-52-2/

Finally today, the hometown of Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman, the cartoonist who unknowingly designed this column’s logo way back in the mists of time, celebrated the 100th anniversary of a bandstand designed by Zim yesterday. Here’s a piece on the festivities.

http://www.stargazette.com/article/20100918/NEWS01/9180319/1113/Town-and-Country–Festivities-to-mark-anniversary-for-Horseheads-park-bandstand

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Saturday, September 18, 2010

COMIC BOOK COMPULSIVE — Ronald McDonald – Adventures in Scouting

“Run, Children, Run!”

Proof positive that they’re posting absolutely everything online these days I recently found a copy of Ronald McDonald — Adventures In Scouting, a nine page comic book from the early 1970s.  This is significant (probably only to me) because I’ve long lost my copy which was probably my first comic book that I didn’t buy so much as earn.

It was the 70′s, popular culture had glommed onto ecology, and the Scouts, having recently reinvented themselves to appear more ‘hip’, latched likewise, as did McDonald’s.  Which is how I ended up dragging a cart full of bundled old newspapers, partially uphill, across cracked and uneven pavement, through a medium bad neighborhood, to my nearest participating McDonald’s.  In return I received a copy of the comic — plus a complimentary hamburger.

At the time I considered this to be a more or less equitable exchange. OK, sure, even at the time I didn’t know why we couldn’t have just loaded the newspapers into a truck, but I suppose that wouldn’t have been very “Scouting”.   And you have to understand at the time McDonald’s actually had a certain cache; believe it, or not, once upon a time  most middle class kids (at least none of the ones I knew) didn’t eat ‘fast food’ on a regular basis.

As you can see for yourself it is a pretty bad comic book, though worth reading if only for the above nightmarish sequence where a frowning Ronald (“remember kids, when you do bad things you make Ronald McDonald frown”) terrifies the living hell out of a bunch of kids.  Plus, it’s a reminder that once upon a time Ronald actually rode around on a giant flying hamburger.

For the record I endorse neither the Boy Scouts of America or the McDonald’s Corporation*.

*For the record I was a Scout for about two years.  I joined out of a desperate need to belong, and a genuine admiration for the ideals the organization stood for.  Of course they also provided me with my first real opportunity to experience bitter disappointment when people in authority didn’t live up to their ideals.

I know it’s hip to hate McDonald’s and while I would never eat actual eat there they do have their uses.   I know there are exceptions but for the most part they are uniformly clean, decent, safe places to loiter and the higher you go up the socio-economic ladder the nicer they are.  Flat screen TV’s, newspapers, free internet, hell, I’ve been to a couple that have actually had fireplaces.

You can’t beat their free refills, and if you actually have to eat something I’ve found that their salad option is entirely edible  – and their fruit smoothies (which actually contain fruit) are pretty good.

Steve Bennett
Steveland

Saturday, September 18, 2010

MaKin’ linKS # 270


Here’s a nice gallery of mostly Silver Age pencils and/or inks from the great Murphy Anderson, one of the guests of honor today at the first ever Cincinnati Comic Expo.

http://ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2010/09/1-anderson.html

Here’s a piece–with original art pages–illustrating the tale of how artist Norm Breyfogle once had a Batman story published at Marvel…as a Captain America story.

http://ohdannyboy.blogspot.com/2010/09/original-art-stories-norm-breyfogles.html

Here’s a classic political and sociological commentary trussed up in a comic book story suit, written by Al Feldstein and drawn by Wallace Wood from a mid-fifties issue of Shock Suspenstories.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2010/09/guilty-by-al-feldstein-and-wally-wood.html

And finally today, here is a piece highlighting the early forties work of Jerry Robinson on Bob Kane’s Batman, complete with original art and original cover scans as well as a a couple photographs that will cause every comics fan to plotz!

http://cloud-109.blogspot.com/2010/09/jerry-robinson-man-that-added-lustre-to.html


Steven Thompson
booksteve

Friday, September 17, 2010

MAKiN’ LiNKS # 269

One of the best comics artists you’ve never heard of is Loston Wallace who has toiled in DC’s licensing department and drawn a number of children’s book tie-ins and such.

http://www.lostonwallace.com/

You think Hawkman’s continuity issues are a Bronze Age development? Hah! Here’s a piece on a major revelation in Silver Age Hawk-history that was never mentioned again!

http://sacomics.blogspot.com/2010/09/lets-agree-never-to-mention-this-again.html

The controversial Al Capp, creator of Li’l Abner and one of the most famous cartoonists of all time, gets a bit of a reevaluation from one of his former assistants over at the National Cartoonist Society.

http://www.reuben.org/news/?p=186

Finally today, there’s that black cat again bringing us all luck! Pappy goes on at some length about Craig’s Felix the Cat book (See elsewhere on this page) and then presents an imaginative story not in the book!

http://pappysgoldenage.blogspot.com/2010/09/number-809-felix-cat-felix-cat-comic.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

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