Super I.T.C.H » 2010 » June
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for June, 2010

Friday, June 25, 2010

“The Monopoly Grind”, A.B. Frost’s William Vanderbilt, 1879: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 48

For the front page of the January 21, 1879 issue of the (New York) Daily Graphic, artist Arthur Burdett Frost depicted William H. Vanderbilt as the Miller of Dee from the traditional 1762 folk song, turning it into The Monopoly Grind.  

At right, people come from far away, hauling their grain for the miller to grind. We see them entering the mill, beneath a sign reading, “This is the place to be ground exceedingly small.”  Exiting the mill at left, people discover that the bags of grain they brought to the miller (Vanderbilt), are now empty. They walk away, down the Road to Ruin, dead bodies, skeletons, and destroyed rival mills receding to the horizon. At the bottom, beneath the cartoon, are altered lyrics in the style of the Miller of Dee.  

Click on picture, to open an enlarged version.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, during which I’d already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYDailyGraphic

Doug
Doug

Friday, June 25, 2010

makin’ LInks # 220

We start today with Ward Sutton whose Sutton Impact was a longtime fixture of The Village Voice. Here he illustrates a wonderfully nostalgic and yet risque look at the Caped Crusader(s) in a VV review of the recent adult video release, BatmanXXX-a Porn Parody which he finds surprisingly enjoyable.

http://www.villagevoice.com/slideshow/its-bat-porn–30167267

Here’s a whole bunch of hilarious Pot-Shot Pete episodes from the pre-Mad Harvey Kurtzman of 1952 and 1953. Kurtzman’s work flitted around the edges of mainstream comics for awhile and then he finally decided to jump in with both feet…only to discover he had to make his own path instead.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/06/harvey-kurtzman-1924-1993-pot-shote.html

Here’s the first issue of Charlton’s Doomsday Plus One, an early showcase (1975) for just turned pro artist John Byrne who would soon enough make his mark spectacularly with X-Men and go on to become  a popular but controversial creator.

http://www.thecharltonstory.com/2010/06/doomsday-1-no-1-july-1975.html

Cole’s Comics is still dissecting the late great Plastic Man and Playboy artist, finally reaching his second run on Quality’s Spirit knock-off, Midnight, from mid-forties issues of Smash Comics.

http://colescomics.blogspot.com/2010/06/libidinous-parrot-relentlessly-pursues.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Puck Magazine & Henry Ward Beecher

"Young love is a flame; very pretty, often very hot and fierce, but still only light and flickering. The love of the older and disciplined heart is as coals, deep-burning, unquenchable."

Henry Ward Beecher

197 years ago today, on June 24, 1813, Henry Ward Beecher was born in Litchfield, Connecticut. He was one of 13 siblings, several of whom went on to become famous in their own right. His father was a devout Presbyterian minister. Henry grew up to become one of the great preachers of the 19th century. Thousands came to hear his sermons, which he used as catalysts of social change.

Beecher believed that Christianity should adapt to the changing culture of the times. He was an abolitionist and advocate of Women’s suffrage, temperance and Darwin’s theory of evolution. He opposed all forms of bigotry – religious, racial and social. Beecher’s fame and fortune grew steadily through the 1850s and 1860s. Before the Civil War, he raised funds to buy weapons (which became known as "Beecher’s Bibles") for those willing to oppose slavery. Early in the war, Beecher tried to persuade Lincoln to emancipate the slaves through a proclamation. He later went on a speaking tour in England to undermine support for the South by explaining the North’s war aims. At the end of the Civil War, President Lincoln invited him to be the main speaker when the Union flag was raised on Confederate soil at Fort Sumter in South Carolina.

The first caricature of Beecher in Puck magazine appeared in the centerspread of the third issue. In "The Millenium at Last", he is shown dressed as a goat, embracing his long-time assistant, Theodore Tilton.

The Millenium at Last! by Joseph Keppler

The Millenium at Last! by Joseph Keppler
The wolf shall dwell with the lamb; and the leopard shall lie down with the kid, and the calf,
and the young lion, and the fatling together, and a little child shall lead them.

Isaiah, 11th Chap. 6th Verse

March 28, 1877, Vol I No. 3; Chromolithograph

19″w x 12 1/2 “h

PUCK has often wondered when the Millenium was coming, and still wonders; but should it put in an appearance unexpectedly, he has taken time by the forelock, and begs to submit his notion of Paradise. "Surely never lighted on this orb a more delightful vision."

ISAIAH furnishes the text for our picture; but PUCK’s reckless artist has out-Isaiahed Isaiah, and has gone beyond the list of animals mentioned by the prophet; and although a Spitz-dog in Paradise, and a dove same as Cameron’s Mrs. Oliver, may at first seem peculiar, they will be found indispensible to the happiness of the happiest of families.

From "Puck’s Cartoons" at the front of the issue

Detail of Henry Ward Beecher

Beecher appeared again in the centerspread of the June 6, 1877 issue when he sided with the Russians during the Russo-Turkish War.

A Traitor to the Cause by Joseph Keppler

A Traitor to the Cause by Joseph Keppler
Beecher Joins the Russians and Astounds the Turks

June 6, 1877, Vol I No. 13; Chromolithograph
19"w x 12 1/2 "h

Beecher first appeared on the cover of Puck during the Great Railroad Strike of 1877. Workers across the U.S. protested starvation-level wage reductions imposed by railroad conglomerates. When strikers attacked railroad property, state and federal troops were dispatched to protect the railways. More than 100 people died.

Beecher condemned the strikers and said that one dollar a day was not enough to support a family if a man "would insist on smoking and drinking beer." He went on to add, "the man who cannot live on bread and water is not fit to live."

Beecher was attacked in the press which contrasted his insensitive words with his annual earnings of $40,000 (equivalent to more than $750,000 today).

Beecher's Theory and Practice by Joseph Keppler

Beecher’s Theory and Practice by Joseph Keppler
H.W.B. – "The Man who can’t Live On Bread and Water is not fit to Live!"

August 8, 1877, Vol. I no. 22; Chromolithograph
12 1/2 "h x 9 "w

In 1874, Beecher’s achievements were further undermined by scandalous rumors of infidelity. The rumors involved a series of attractive young women, but then his assistant, Theodore Tilton, accused Beecher of “criminal conversation” with Tilton’s wife, who was a member of Beecher’s congregation. Elizabeth Tilton was known as a pious and passionate woman. She confessed to her husband that she had an adulterous relationship with Beecher. Her confession created a highly-publicized scandal and her husband sued Beecher. The jury was unable to reach a verdict. Beecher and her husband pressured her to recant her story, which she did. It became a salacious trial that was the most widely covered event of the century with more newspaper headlines than the entire Civil War.

Two years later, Elizabeth Tilton once again confessed to the affair and she was excommunicated by the church.

Elizabeth as Marguerite "I did, I did not, – I did –" by Joseph Keppler

Elizabeth as Marguerite "I did, I did not, – I did –" by Joseph Keppler

April 24, 1878, Vol. III no. 59; Chromolithograph
12 1/2 "h x 9 "w

"Marguerite" is a reference to Marguerite Gautier, a tragic character in the play Camille (La Dame aux Camélias) by Alexandre Dumas, fils. Dumas based the character on Marie Duplessis, a French courtesan and mistress to a number of wealthy men.

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Thursday, June 24, 2010

An Interview with R.O. Blechman

AND

PRESENT

Talking Lines: The Graphic Stories of R.O. BlechmanDear James: Letters to a Young Illustrator.  These are landmark publications, both by R.O. Blechman, one of our greatest living animators and cartoonists.  If I seem like a super fangirl about this, it’s because I am.  Blechman’s work has influenced me in myriad and powerful ways.  His creations have equal capacity for love and folly.  His satire is equal parts devastating and compassionate.  He surpasses the angry and reaches the sublime, and while it appears effortless, R.O. Blechman works his magic because he cares so much about his craft.

Talking Lines was brought to us with love by Drawn and Quarterly, insanely well-designed by Tom Devlin.  The book itself presents like a Blechman cartoon, everything possible stripped away and then stripped away again and again, until only the necessary remains.  It’s part autobiography and part collector’s dream — disparate cartoons gathered from the four corners and combined with previously unpublished work.  The introduction by Seth is brief and peerless, and I won’t bother to attempt a duplication here.  Let’s just say that in Blechman’s hands, the much-maligned and neglected “human condition” is fully redeemed.  I’m into redemption.  I look for it everywhere.  And when you find it in Blechman, you need look no further.

You need to check your pulse before reading Dear James, because it will stimulate you and excite you, and possibly provoke you into doing your greatest work to date.  It is quite simply the best book on creativity ever written.  You’ll be so motivated, and feel so empowered, that you may begin working round the clock.  Maybe see your doctor first, just to be sure you’re healthy enough to withstand the sudden flow of creative juice.  You’d take your car to the mechanic before racing in the Grand Prix, right?

The opportunity to interview R.O. Blechman left me with priceless memories, not only because I chatted with this wonderful man, but because it provided an occasion to collaborate with one of my colleagues, J.J. Sedelmaier, a graduate of The Ink Tank.  Who better to introduce Blechman than a fellow animator?

J.J. writes:

R.O. Blechman is one of this planet’s artist/designer treasures. Few people have had as much influence on their chosen industry and been witness to the transformation of their craft due to their involvement as R.O. His career launched early with the success of “The Juggler of Our Lady” as a book and soon thereafter an animated motion picture – narrated by Boris Karloff no less!

During a period when animated/cartoon characters were relatively conventional and formulaic, his collaboration with animator/director John Hubley demonstrated that a simple graphic cartooning style with broken lines could be indeed be animated.  Up to this point, the consensus was if a line had a gap, the paint/color would seep out – where do you end the color if there’s no line to contain it?

What’s taken for granted in 2010 was revolutionary in the 1950’s!

To this day, Blechman continues to grow as a graphic design force.  He still pushes himself and questions convention with his deceptively clean and simple (never simplistic) ideas executed in their trademark clever and witty illustration style.  I’ve always seen him as an artist/writer/chemist.  He puts all the elements into his centrifugal brain and distills the idea, the design, and the execution, into only what’s absolutely necessary.  All the useless stuff separates from the essential.

You have to reflect on how rare it is (especially in the world of advertising) to see an artist’s point of view in such a pure form.

R.O. Blechman: Unique. Special. Totally human.

Thank you so much, J.J.!  And now, without further ado, let’s get to know this man.

ITCH: What was your first comic book?
R.O. Blechman: As a kid I hardly read comic books. My parents disapproved of them, so I had to go to my Uncle Charlie’s house where his four sons had a huge collection of them.

What are you reading right now?
I’m about to read Philip Roth’s Exit Ghost because a dear friend of mine highly recommended it– and I like almost all of Roth’s writing.

What is your guilty pleasure?  At least, the comics-related one!
None. My guilty pleasures are all culinary.

Who was the first cartoonist you met?
My Uncle Nat.  When he came to visit us my brother and I wouldn’t let him leave the house until he had drawn a bunch of cartoons. He might have become a professional artist– maybe a cartoonist– if he didn’t enter the family business (wholesale dry goods. The building still stands: 555 Broadway, now the home of Scholastic Books).

This is a cartoon by my Uncle Nat.  He’s flying his airplane, circa 1938, which he gave up when my Aunt said, “You have to give it up.  It’s either me or that airplane.”  He made the wrong choice.

Which dead cartoonist would you most like to meet?
My uncle. But we probably wouldn’t discuss cartooning. I suppose if I could meet a dead cartoonist it would be Saul Steinberg. I suspect that as a person he would be as extraordinary as his artwork.

What would you say?
Probably either the wrong things or nothing at all. I once met Robert Graves at an intimate dinner party, and didn’t say a word to him even though I was in the middle of reading one of his books (a great one–his memoir, Goodbye to All That).  I was once seated next to Al Hirschfeld at a dinner party, and I was tongue-tied throughout the meal.

What has been the highlight of your career to date?
My animated film, an adaptation of Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du Soldat.  I suppose a second would be my latest book, Talking Lines.  It’s a great survey of my printed stuff, and beautifully designed.

Please tell us a little about your latest project.
No, I’m superstitious.

Well, alright, I’ll mention that Sempé asked me to animate one of his books (we show at the same gallery in Munich). I’ve already done the storyboard and now it’s a question of funding the project.

Which comics character do you most identify with?
None.  I’ve never been much of a comics reader.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be?
To persuade some billionaire to part with a few million to jumpstart one of my film projects.  Fat chance!

Dear reader, what we presented here today does not solve the mystery of how R.O. Blechman inspires such love, respect, and gratitude.  You’ll have to read his books to find that out!  But think about this: if I find his work life-changing, and I am neither an illustrator, cartoonist, nor animator, just imagine what his books can do for you!  After you get home from the bookstore, drop us a line and tell us what you think.

beth
beth

Thursday, June 24, 2010

MAKIN’ LiNkS # 219

A fan-favorite for decades and recently revived in a new format, here from 1963 we have the very first appearance of the Nightwing and Flamebird, the Batman and Robin of the bottle city of Kandor.

http://mailittoteamup.blogspot.com/2010/06/superman-158.html

Although forever associated with DC in the sixties, artist Gil Kane did a handful of stories for Marvel in mid-decade that brought a breath of fresh air to the so-called House of Ideas. Here’s part one one of my all-time favorites, Gil’s Captain America story featuring the first of many “returns” for Bucky Barnes before they finally got one that took.

http://www.kingdomkane.com/2010/06/if-bucky-lives.html

Not comics at all but fans of great illustrators should hurry over to Golden Age Comic Book Stories and catch a treasure trove of art by Al Hirschfeld, one of the most stylized and yet most mainstream caricaturists of all time!

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/06/al-hirschfeld-1903-2003-american.html

Finally today, here’s a nice helping of Bucky Bug newspaper strips from the Walt Disney Studios of 1933.

http://comicrazys.com/2010/06/17/silly-symphonies-sundays-bucky-bug-walt-disney-studios-1933/

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Thursday, June 24, 2010

1881-82 Comic Strips featuring William Vanderbilt, Episode 5: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 47

In the years 1881 and 1882, artist Charles Jay Taylor created a series of approximately one dozen sequential comic strips featuring monopolist and stock market manipulator, William H. Vanderbilt. These appeared on the front page of the New York City’s Daily Graphic newspaper, usually with a gap of months between each stand-alone episode. To find the prior episodes, click here.

In Episode 5, Taylor gives us The House that Vander-built, becoming one of numerous artists, before and after him, to utilize the nursery rhyme This is the House that Jack Built, in a pointed satire on a political or public figure, or situation.  

In the second panel, note the sign hanging near the well, reading “Stock Watered Here”. “Watering stock” is Wall Street parlance for artificially/falsely swelling the value of a stock, to sell it off to suckers, then sell your own stock, rake in the money, and let everyone else’s investment crash. The water metaphor continues forward into several of the other panels. Note that in the left-center panel, the bulls (i.e., bull market — buyers) are looking at the water, and getting dry. In the panel beneath, a bruin (bear market — sell out) shows up, scaring the bulls, who run away. The three bottom-right corner panels, meanwhile, involve the crashing market/cutting of stock values, while simultaneously referring to railroad baron Vanderbilt’s controlling of prices of goods/supplies, via his control of the railroad. In the center panel, we see Vanderbilt standing in front of a billboard reading “Buy the New Watered Stocks”. Atop it, is his Egyptian obelisk, from Episode Zero, and a sign reading “Art Gallery Spaces to Let”, referring to his accumulation of art (which we’ll see in several future episodes).     

The House that Vander-Built appeared on September 12, 1881. 

Click on picture, to open a large enough version to read.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, during which I’d already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYDailyGraphic

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Effect of Hard Times on the Rich and on the Poor, 1877: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 46

A special thanks today to historian Richard Samuel West, who permitted me to scan the below cartoon from page 133 of his book, The San Francisco Wasp: An Illustrated History, the best book written about the West Coast’s equivalent to Puck magazine. To obtain a copy of Rich’s book, click here.

Titled Effect of the Present Hard Times on the Rich and the Poor, with art by George Frederick Keller, this cartoon appeared in the May 26, 1877 issue of The Wasp. For commentary, I’ll quote Rich West:

“More San Franciscans were adversely affected by the collapse of mining stock values in 1875 than they had been by the general economic depression of 1873. In this cartoon, Keller pointed out that the wealthy always managed to stay on top.”

Click on picture, to see an enlarged version.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, during which I’d already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform WaspMag

Doug
Doug

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

The Amazing Animals of J.J. Grandville

Ancestors of Mickey Mouse, Krazy Kat, Bugs Bunny, Pogo and all the other funny animals of the 20th century can be found in the amazing 19th-century engravings of the French caricaturist Jean Ignace Isidore Gérard, better known as J. J. Grandville.

In the 1830s Grandville worked in Paris as one of the stars of Charles Philipon’s team of artists creating political caricatures that attacked the regime of Louis-Philippe in La Silhouette and La Caricature.

Between 1840 and 1842, Grandville created more than 200 illustrations for a series of articles titled Scènes de la Vie Privée et Publique des Animaux (Translation: Scenes from the Private and Public Life of Animals). Grandville’s drawings are as anatomically precise as scientific illustrations and so elegantly rendered that they’re more than funny – they’re metaphors and parables of human experience.

Grandville Illustration

Un soir, ma maitresse pria l’une des jeunes miss de chanter. by J.J. Grandville
Translation: "One night my mistress begged one of the young ladies sing"

1841, Engraving, 4 1/2 "w x 5 1/2 "h

 

Grandville Illustration

Covers of Scènes de la Vie Privée et Publique des Animaux
Translation: "Public and Private Life of Animals, Scenes of Manners"

1844 Edition, Volume 1, 17"w x 11h "

Grandville Illustration

Prologue Illustrations by J.J. Grandville

1844 Edition, Engraving, 6 "w x 8 1/2 "h

Grandville Illustration

Pour payer le propriétaire, un homme très-dur, qui s’appelait M. Vautour by J.J. Grandville
Translation: "To pay the owner, a very hard man, whose name was Mr. Vulture"

1844 Edition, Engraving, 4 "w x 5 1/2 "h

Grandville Illustration

Art. 215. Le mari doit prtection à sa femme; la femme obéissance à son mari.
by J.J. Grandville
Translation: "The husband owes protection to his wife, the wife obedience to her husband."

1844 Edition, Engraving, 5 "w x 6 "h

 

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com
David Donihue, GreatCaricatures.com

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Makin’ Links # 218

We start today with Archie’s older lookalike cousin Andy Andrews in “The Iron Curtain Caper.” What’s that? You’ve never heard of Andy? Well, it seems he’s been sitting unpublished and unknown in a file for about 55 years but this week the Archie Comics website is finally printing his sole 1950′s adventure, one page at a time.

http://www.archiecomics.com/blog/homeroom/2010/06/exclusive-andy-andrews-iron-curtain-capers—new-5th-page.html

Here’s a nice collection of Jack King Kirby’s full page pin-ups, posters and portfolio pieces from the sixties and seventies, including a lovely Captain America one that I had never seen before.

http://grantbridgestreet.blogspot.com/2010/06/jack-kirby.html

Here’s a rare glimpse at the story behind the art, in this case Frank Frazetta’s art and one of several similar pieces on this site. This one deals with a little-known Tarzan painting that was, at one time, much more explicit than it ended up.

http://frazfritz.blogspot.com/2010/06/frazetta-story-behind-art-2.html

Finally today, fresh from the early part of the previous century, here’s a bountiful crash course in the easily recognizable and most enjoyable art stylings of Mr. John Held, Jr.

http://goldenagecomicbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/06/john-held-jr.html

Steven Thompson
booksteve

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Humors of the Great Wall Street Panic, 1873: Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons, Part 45

From the September 26, 1873 issue of the (New York) Daily Graphic, comes Humors of the Great Wall Street Panic, by C.J. Taylor

One of our two favorite latter 19th century stock manipulators — Jay Gould —  is prominent amongst the targets here again. The top left cartoon shows a man running forward, pistols out. He passes a friend who asks him, “What are digging for?” To which he replies, “I’m digging for Gould!”  Meanwhile, top center, perched atop the doorwayof the Union Trust Company, is a vulture sitting upon two skulls. The vulture is identified as “Jay Ghoul-d“. On the doorway of the Union Trust Company, is posted: “Closed in consequence of the death of honesty in the family.” Also, bankers are shown hopping trains and steam ships, with large luggage bags (implied, containing the depositors’ money). And in one ray of hope we’ll likely not see, a “Retired Broker” is shown wearing prison stripes, breaking rocks.

Click on picture, to see an enlarged version.

Click here to find prior Wall Street Frauds Make Wonderful Cartoons entries, and related I.T.C.H. posts. This series will continue, so long as the debate on financial reforms continues in Congress (except Mondays and holidays, during which I’d already had other material planned).

Doug Wheeler

financial reform NYDailyGraphic

Doug
Doug

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