Super I.T.C.H » 2007 » August
Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for August, 2007

Friday, August 31, 2007

Ku Klux Klan Komics in the New York Post

Some cartoonists in the 1920s had regular rotating subjects and corresponding titles for their newspaper panels or strips. F’instance, H. T. Webster had “How to Torture Your Wife”, “The Timid Soul”, and “The Boy Who Made Good” in the same daily space. Claire Briggs’ cartoons would vary day to day, sometimes under the title “When A Feller Needs A Friend”, sometimes “There’s One In Every Office”, sometimes the terrific “Ain’t It A Grand And Glorious Feeling.”

A lesser known cartoonist than those two gents was Al Zere. One day his comic strip would be called “Man The Master”, such as the one below from 1921. This was typical comic strip fare of the time–and still reflected in far too many current strips: women are essentially bitches, men are idiots…


(click for a closer look)

But Zere also had a regular offering, which was a part of his repertoire,  that I unearthed yesterday while doing some research for the next “Arf” book. This strip totally shocks and awes me! It was a continuing feature in the “New York Evening Post”, and would alternate with “Man The Master”. It was called… “Our Own Ku Klux Klan”. Yes, you read that right. I herewith present two examples:


(click for a closer look)


(click for a closer look)

Zere’s Klan is kind of a cute, lovable Shmoo-like mob of aggressive masked do-gooders who you call upon, kind of like Superman, to right life’s wrongs, get rid of meddling mothers of girlfriends, put snobby rich dudes in their place, etc.

This strip didn’t run in some Southern paper or Ku Klux Klan organ, but in the longest running daily paper, the “New York Evening Post”. The paper was founded by Alexander Hamilton, the abolitionist William Cullen Bryant was an early editor. From 1897 to 1918 the paper was managed by Oswald Garrison Villard, a founding member of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union. The paper eventually changed its name to the “New York Post” and is today owned by Rupert Murdoch. “Our Ku Klux Klan” was also reprinted in the Chicago-based, nationally distributed, “Cartoons Magazine” of the 1920s, which is where I found it.

I don’t know much about the cartoonist Al Zere other than later in the Twenties he did a strip called “Susie Sunshine”. Comic strip expert Alan Holtz says, “Zere… took a swing at a whole lot of syndicated strips over his long career.”

Just yesterday morning I was talking to an acquaintance who is doing research on local history, we’re 45 minutes up the Hudson River from New York City. She has discovered something covered up by embarrassed local historians and excised from local printed histories. Cortland, NY, in the mid-1920s was the location for a Ku Klux Klan picnic with 25,000 attendees! That fact and this strip show that the Klan was active in the North and accepted by the public. I’ve since thought that not only did “Our Ku Klux Klan” run in the mainstream northern press, but I recall few, if any, political cartoons there against Klan activities in my research into cartooning history. “Ain’t It NOT A Grand And Glorious Feeling”?

Your thoughts, Arf Lovers?

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Thursday, August 30, 2007

Pissy-Eyed the Sailor Man!

I’ve covered on the Arf Lovers blog before that evidence shows that Popeye is a pothead. I’m out of state today to do a photoshoot and spotted Popeye’s Pub on the way to my meeting. Popeye must be off the funny weed and now he’s on the juice. Stewed, tattooed and if he rubs some Olive Oyl on himself–screwed!

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Wednesday, August 29, 2007

It’s Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday!

It was always exciting when I was a kid when in comics books, for some trumped up reason, two superheroes were fighting it out. So here we have two well known heroes, Dr. Strange and this week’s Wacky Wonder Woman…and the question is: who’s more cringe-worthy in their convention costume, Doc S. or the Amazon Princess, hm?

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Nuts for Mutts!

We were going nuts with happiness at YOE! Studio this morning when UPS brought the Mutts bookends we sculpted for Dark Horse. Patrick McDonnell and David Scroggy were awesome to work with on this and we are so PROUD–we, *BLUSH*, thinks it’s one of the best things we ever did! It didn’t hurt that it was Earl and Mooch, our favorite contemporary comic strip critters–quite inspiring!


(click for a closer look)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, August 28, 2007

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Casper the Friendly Ghost Sung by…Elvis!?!

Never before or since has the ghost of a dead child (Richie Rich?) been so fun-loving and popular as Casper the Friendly Ghost. You’d think the subject of being haunted by a little boy would be morbid or tragic. Just shows how much I know!


(click for a closer look)

Casper has a long history in comic books as well as in animated cartoons, of course. This raises the question, “Should the Arf blog limit itself to printed cartoons, or are animated cartoons still within the definition of “The Unholy Marriage of Art and Comics?”

Either way, in honor of the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley, we’re presenting this amusing novelty record, from one friendly ghost to another.


(if no bar appears please click here to listen)

By the way, that’s not really Elvis singing. The vocals are credited to Jess Harnell. (Perhaps that’s the name Elvis is using these days.)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Monday, August 27, 2007

It’s Dollman Monday!

While attempting to solve the problem of a “Poison Pistol”, going off as we speak, Doll Man makes crooks assume the position!

Did you notice the big rubber stamp on the cover? Collectors of Golden Age comics know this stamp well. It says “Bonnett’s Ohio’s Largest Back Issue Dealer of Magazines and Comics 502 E. 5th St, Dayton Ohio”. TONS of Golden Age comics you’ll see in collections and at conventions have this stamp from this used bookstore. Apparently thousands and thousands and thousands of comics went through the store in the 40s and 50s and 60s and got this rubber stamp defacing. The store started in 1939, the year Superman got his start, too. They must have rubber stamped a few Action #1′s in their day. Frank Pauer, ace cartoonist and editor of the National Cartoonist Society newsletter, took me to the still existing Bonnett’s a couple of months ago when I was visiting him. Alas, it was closed for the evening. Frank says the bookstore still sells comics (and incidently lots of fetish tapes and magazines), but have finally abandoned the stamp thingie–the ultimate humiliation.


(click for a closer look)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Thursday, August 23, 2007

And Now A Word From Our Sponsor, Part 6,732

If you liked the machine guns for kids in our last old comic book ad here’s a nice companion piece. I had one of these babies when I was young. I could barely breath when I slipped it over my head to play “army”, but its coolness was well worth the near suffocation.


(click for a closer look)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Wednesday, August 22, 2007

It’s Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday!

Arf Lovers have let me know that they like to see pics of Wacky Wonder Woman together with Super Girl on Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesdays. I have no idea where they’re going with that, but I’m happy to oblige with pics like that so that Arf Lovers might check out those dynamic duos.

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Flash Gordon

D. J. David B. is back in a Flash with the second installment of his Tuesday comics music column.

Wow, is it Flash Gordon time again? My watch must have stopped.

Flash had his heyday in the 1930′s with his seminal comic strip beautifully illustrated by the often-imitated, never-duplicated Alex Raymond, who along with Milt Caniff inspired the careers of just about every comic book artist who came after.


(click for a closer look)

By 1936 Flash was in the movies with a thrill-packed serial starring Buster Crabbe. In 1954 it was once again time to bring back Flash, in this case as a TV series with Steve Holland in the title role. An animated series followed in 1979, and a somewhat embarrassing feature film adaptation in 1980. Of course, that pales in comparison to Flesh Gordon, the soft-core porn flick (always spelled in lower case) that thoroughly embarrassed movie-goers in 1974.

That brings us up to 2007, with a brand new Flash Gordon TV series on the Sci-Fi Channel! I guess Flash Gordon is one of those characters that just keeps coming back, like yo-yos and herpes.

But now, flashback to the halcyon days of 1966 when Flash Gordon didn’t have a big comeback. The Batman TV show had taken the nation by storm and programmers reasoned (incorrectly) that the time was right for all kinds of costumed super-dudes to have TV series. Enter The Green Hornet, exit super trend. Jumping on this bandwagon were dozens of would-be millionaires hoping to cash in on the super-hit gravy train begun by The Batman Theme (more on that in the weeks to come). One enterprising record label released a fairly listenable LP with songs about Batman, Tarzan, The Phantom and Flash Gordon, just to make sure all bases were covered. Listen!


(if no bar appears please click here to listen)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

Monday, August 20, 2007

It’s Dollman Monday! (Redux)

While trolling through Scott Shaw’s wonderful Oddball Comics site I found a interesting Doll Man cover. Sol Brodsky and Israel Waldman under their I. W. Publishing/Super Comics, Inc. imprint illegally reprinted Golden Age stories from old art or printing plates they dug up in the 1960s. Doll Man had three issues resurrecting his stories including this reprint of last week’s It’s Doll Man Monday comic. What amazes me is that, even when he’s not tied up, Doll Man instantly “assumes the position” of thrusting his little package towards the villain Minstrel in virtually the same pose of the Golden Age cover. Maybe Doll Man is trying to live up to what I.W. deemed him on the cover, “The Biggest Little Pack of Dynamite”. Or maybe a flaming banjo will just simply do that kind of stuff to you.


(click for a closer look)

Compare the cover above with last week’s It’s Doll Man Monday cover below. I do note that instead of a bell tower the new cover’s location is an art museum which makes me happy as i alway like examples of “The Unholy Marriage of Art and Comics”, the Arf books’ subtitle.


(click for a closer look)

Craig
C. Yoe (in the funny papers)

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