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Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Get these books by
Craig Yoe:
Archie's Mad House Krazy Kat & The Art of George Herriman: A Celebration
Archie's Mad House The Carl Barks Big Book of Barney Bear
Archie's Mad House Amazing 3-D Comics
Archie's Mad House Archie's Mad House
Archie's Mad House The Great Treasury of Christmas Comic Book Stories
Archie's Mad House The Official Fart Book
Archie's Mad House The Official Barf Book
Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf Popeye: The Great Comic Book Tales of Bud Sagendorf
Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond! Archie: Seven Decades of America's Favorite Teenagers... And Beyond!
Dick Briefer's Frankenstein Dick Briefer's Frankenstein
Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women Barney Google: Gambling, Horse Races, and High-Toned Women
Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails Felix The Cat: The Great Comic Book Tails
Klassic Krazy Kool Kids Komics The Golden Collection of Klassic Krazy Kool KIDS KOMICS"
"Another amazing book from Craig Yoe!"
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
Dan DeCarlo's Jetta Dan DeCarlo's Jetta
"A long-forgotten comic book gem."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story The Complete Milt Gross Comic Books and Life Story
"Wonderful!"
-Playboy magazine
"Stunningly beautiful!"
- The Forward
"An absolute must-have."
-Jerry Beck
CartoonBrew.com
The Art of Ditko
The Art of Ditko
"Craig's book revealed to me a genius I had ignored my entire life."
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
The Greatest Anti-War Cartoons
The Great Anti-War Cartoons
Introduction by Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus
"Pencils for Peace!"
-The Washington Post
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers
"Crazy, fun, absurd!"
-Mark Frauenfelder
BoingBoing.net
More books by Craig Yoe

Archive for the ‘Sexy Stuff’ Category

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

D. J. David B. Spins Comics-Tunes: Wonder Woman Wednesday!

djnew

Sometimes I like to spotlight a song with a timely tie-in, such as a record associated with a new movie that’s in theaters or an anniversary of some kind. Other times I just randomly select a comics character or a comics tune for no good reason. This is one of those times.

Way back on February 15th, 2006, we began a feature on this very blog called “Wacky Wonder Woman Wednesday.” Each week (on Wednesday, natch) we presented a different image of Wonder Woman. Some were super, some were sexy, and some were silly, but all of them were Wonderful. It was one of the most popular features on the ol’ I.T.C.H. You can navigate to past Wednesdays by clicking on the link in the right-hand column.

I thought it would be fun to showcase a few of these Wonder Woman pictures on a Comics Tunes TUESDAY along with a song. See if you agree.

Wonder Woman 01

Wonder Woman 02

Wonder Woman 03

Wonder Woman 04

Wonder Woman 06

Wonder Woman 05

Wonder Woman 07

If you cross your eyes you can see Linda Carter in 3D! (Click to enlarge.)

Click the link below and enjoy!

notessmall

 

David B
DJ David B.

Friday, March 21, 2014

American Fashion Police 1913

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Continuing our Women’s History Month coverage, today we have a several pages from a variety of year 1913 issues of Cartoons Magazine, of male cartoonists’ commentary on women’s fashions. And in particular, on prudish by even 1913 standards, attempts by male politicians to regulate what women could wear, for the reason that “scandalous” dress by women could lead to the corruption of men’s morals. (Sounds pretty similar to Taliban reasoning, though not dealt with nearly as harshly.)

Click on the above & below pages, to make the cartoons & text large enough to read.

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Doug Wheeler

Women’s History Cartoons Magazine Centennial

Doug
Doug

Friday, February 28, 2014

Dreams Come True (Part 2)

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Closing out this year’s African American History Month postings, we have more extracts from the late 1940s/early 1950s advertising booklet Dreams Come True! (click here to see Part 1). It was published by the Black and White Company (which made beauty products company for African Americans), and illustrated by African American artist George Lee.

The pamphlet consists mostly of cartoon-illustrated ads, plus a number of one-page cartoon bios of African American historical & contemporary figures. Above we have a bio of Heavyweight Boxing Champion Jack Johnson, and below, musician Fats Waller. Further below are found bios on Robert Abbott and Richard Wright.

Click on the above & below pages, to make them large enough to read.

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Most of the Black & White Company’s beauty products, were aimed at making African Americans appear more like whites. The ads shown in last week’s extracts involved bleaching/lightening skin color; the first two ads above are for products to slick down one’s hair, making it appear more like white people’s hair. Beneath is for an acme treatment.

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Doug Wheeler

Black History Month AdvertisingStrips

Doug
Doug

Friday, February 21, 2014

Dreams Come True (Part 1)

DreamsComeTrueCenterSmall

Next in our African American History Month postings, we have the late 1940s/early 1950s advertising booklet Dreams Come True!, illustrated by African American artist George Lee. Primarily targeted towards African American women, the booklet promotes various beauty products from the Black & White Company of Memphis, Tennessee, and New York City, NY. These products, such as skin bleaching cream, were largely to make African Americans appear less black, and more white, and in that sense is reminiscent of an appallingly racist 1892 promotional soap booklet we showed last year.

Click on the above & below pages to view them in greater detail.

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In addition to the ad pages, there are also a number of one-page cartoon bios of African American historical & contemporary figures. Included in today’s page extracts, are musician William C. Handy, scientist George Washington Carver, and early Civil Rights Leader Frederick Douglass.

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Embarrassingly, another aspect of the book is how to turn your dreams into numbers for gambling.

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I attempted to find out more about the history of the Black & White Company online (such as, were its owners black and/or white?), but had no luck. Another extract of pages will be posted next week.

Doug Wheeler

Tigwissel Tuesdays Women’s History AdvertisingStrips

Doug
Doug

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Women’s History Month: A Wild Night in a Hansom Cab, 1895

With the approach of April Fool’s Month (one day is not nearly enough!), it seems appropriate to conclude this year’s Women’s History Month coverage, with a bit of silliness — Photo Funnies from the April 27th, 1895 issue of the New York City publication, The Standard.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and better read the words within them.

The Standard was one of a handful of 1890s/early 1900s periodicals, that fairly regularly featured photo funnies (or, “fumetti”). Sequential photographic comic strips were hardly something new — going back to the late 1850s in the format of series of stereographic cards — but it wasn’t really until the 1890s that printing technology allowed for mass, cheap reproduction of photographs in magazines and newspapers. I suspect there was a certain degree of overlap between printed photo funnies and stereograph sequences (there are certainly instances I’ve spotted of cartoonists stealing from stereograph sequences — and vice-versa). And even more likely, an overlap in camera crews, actors, and studio sets involved. But I’ve not yet explored that possibility.

At any rate, the type of comedic material The Standard (and at least one other parallel publication) regularly featured — as you can see in the example shown here — tended to be more out-there risque than American & British (at least) stereoviews tended to go.

The “sequence” of events in these photographs (and to be more accurate, some of these have combined images of photographed players, placed atop/in front of cartoon or drawn backgrounds; with the last scene, below, being purely cartoon), is somewhat artificial. They all refer to the same/similar incident, but I’ve rearranged them to read in a more fun, sequential manner — this is not the order they appeared in the magazine.

Finally, I’d like to point out the similarity of the above 1895 photographic comedy, with the below panel from an 1851 comic book I posted here earlier this month… (Clicking on the below picture, will take you to that comic book.)

Doug Wheeler

NYStandard

Doug
Doug

Thursday, February 14, 2013

“Cupid & Crinoline”, Thomas Onwhyn 1858

This year for Valentine’s Day, we present the British fold-out comic strip booklet, Cupid & Crinoline. Published on October 20th, 1858, creator Thomas Onwhyn parodies the impediment to romance that the popular women’s fashion known as a “hoop skirt”, or, “Crinoline”, imposed.

Click here to find previous Valentine’s Day postings.

To complete the story (never mind that it really has no ending), the final panel below comes from the website of rare book dealer David Brass. (My copy does have the final panel — however, I would have had to break the spine of the booklet, to get it to lie flat on my scanner — luckily, David Brass has that panel posted on his website.)

ADDENDUM December 22, 2013: Ian Alcock has pointed out to me, that the reason the above “has no ending”, is because my copy is missing the ending! I am apparently missing the final two panels (as are every other internet visual presentation of this book that I’ve seen, including the David Brass copy I reference above — which is why I had thought my copy was complete…) From Ian, “…some (copies), like yours, do lack the last two (panels). The reason is that the panorama was often pasted to the backboard on the 10th panel, with 1-9 opening to the left and 11/12 opening to the right, so the seem between 10/11 was a weak point where splits occurred. The ending of the story is that in fear of being buried alive, Adolphus fears he must leave Kitty (11), but then Kitty discards her expander and resumes her own lovely figure and Adolphus -and Fido- are happy again.”

Doug Wheeler

ValentinesDay Women’s History

Doug
Doug

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Silk Hat Harry’s Divorce Suit

This being the time to shop for gifts, let’s take a peek at what the comic strip fan of a century ago, might have hoped to find waiting for them beneath the tree. And what better gift to begin with, than Silk Hat Harry’s Divorce Suit, by Thomas A. Dorgan (who went by the nickname “Tad”)?

The wonderful thing about Silk Hat Harry (published 1912, by M.A. Donohue & Co., Chicago), is that giving it could double as a hint to family members, of changes soon to come following the Holidays! Such a perfect collection to convey that Christmas Spirit!

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, the front cover of Silk Hat Harry’s Divorce Suit; beneath, the title page; below that, some sample daily strips, reprinted in the book.

Below, the illustration appearing on the front & back interior covers.

Doug Wheeler

Women’s History Women’s Suffrage Suffragette

Doug
Doug

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

The Day After…

The above comes from the rear cover of the December 1932 issue of Americana, after the conclusion of the Presidential race between Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Doug Wheeler

ElectionComics AmericanaMag

Doug
Doug

Friday, May 11, 2012

Focus on Cartoonists: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, May 1912, Part 5

The Cartoons Magazine for May 1912, placed focus on three cartoonists.

Above, photos and brief biographies of American cartoonists Fontaine Fox (whose first name they managed to mispell) and William Allen Rogers.

Beneath, early work by Danish artist Gerda Wegener (warning to those at work: clicking on her name will bring you to a site which includes samples of some of Wegener’s more sexually oriented work). Cartoons Magazine referred to Wegener as Europe’s answer to American female cartoonist, Nell Brinkley — whom ironically, to this point, Cartoons Magazine had yet to publish anything by.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view them in detail, and to read the accompanying text.

Doug Wheeler

W.A. Rogers

Doug
Doug

Friday, April 20, 2012

Focus on European Cartoons, Part 1: Cartoons Magazine Centennial, April 1912, Part 15

Every issue of Cartoons Magazine contained pages of cartoons from around the world, the April 1912 fourth issue being no exception. Today’s posting concentrates on (some) of the cartoons from Europe.

Click on the above & below pictures, to view the cartoons in detail, and read their captions.

Above, What to Let Others Overhear, by British cartoonist W.K. Haselden. Beneath, cartoons from Germany, France, Hungary, and, England (the latter via artist Lawson Wood.

Above & below, two more examples from France.

A second posting of European cartoons from the April 1912 issue will appear next week.

Doug Wheeler

Fliegende Blatter Pele Mele LeRire JournalAmusant London Sketch Emile Villemot

Doug
Doug

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